Mint Tiny Homes Loft Edition model is full of natural light

January 13, 2021 by  
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For those who love the idea of a tiny home but hate the thought of feeling cramped inside a small space, the Loft Edition model from Mint Tiny Homes should definitely be on the radar. With three layout options and two sizes to choose from, this tiny home is super customizable. Best of all, there is a huge amount of natural light built into the design. The Loft Edition comes on either a 30-foot-long or 34-foot-long trailer with turnkey prices starting at $83,270 and $88,051, respectively. The 30-foot model spans 350 square feet, while the 34-foot model has an additional 36 square feet. Both options sleep four to six people comfortably. Related: Tiny House Sustainable Living blog documents life in an off-grid tiny home The Loft Edition tiny home kitchen comes with an oven and cooktop under a stainless steel hood fan as well as a full-sized, 24-inch-wide refrigerator and freezer. The kitchen also features a lovely ceramic apron front sink, cabinets, a butcher-block countertop, chrome faucets and laminate flooring. There is a full laundry hookup and a large shower with glass doors in the bathroom along with a 12,000 BTU mini split air conditioner and electric heating. The tiny house has plenty of storage in the cupboard staircase, and the full-sized loft allows for ample space in the downstairs lounge. Our favorite parts of this home are the windows, which line the upper part of the walls as well as the bottom to bring light into every corner. Customers can choose to install a skylight in the loft, giving the space even more natural light. A massive window opens from the living room, which helps to extend the sightline out toward the natural environment while also bringing in fresh air. French doors in the front give the Loft Edition tiny home a rustic yet elegant feel. The company also offers off-grid and sustainable features such as composting toilets and LED lighting. + Mint Tiny Homes Images via Mint Tiny Homes

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Mint Tiny Homes Loft Edition model is full of natural light

Early learning center sustainably embraces rural New Zealand

September 10, 2020 by  
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In the rural New Zealand haven of Dairy Flat, U.K.-based architecture firm Collingridge and Smith Architects has recently completed the Fantails Estate, an early learning center for 154 babies and preschoolers. Designed to sit sensitively within its rural context, the modern building is built primarily of timber and opens up to the outdoors with large windows and areas for outdoor play. Sustainability has also been naturally woven into the design, which includes a rainwater harvesting system, onsite blackwater treatment, a high-insulated building envelope and passive solar principles. Set over 3.5 hectares of land, the Fantails Estate was conceived as a unique “luxury lodge” for children. The center features a radial plan with six individual blocks fanned out around a geometric timber canopy and centrally located car park. The six blocks comprise five individual classrooms as well as a private staff block housing the kitchen, laundry and administrative spaces.  Related: Chrysalis Childcare Centre uses existing trees as symbolic centerpieces Each classroom opens up to a shaded, north-facing terrace that connects to a large playground and countryside views. The integration of all-weather play spaces provides children with seven times the minimum area for outdoor play, with each child allotted approximately 52 square meters of individual play space, according to the architects. The sizing and orientation of the blocks are also optimized for indoor access to natural light and ventilation. Low-E glazed sliding doors emphasize the indoor/outdoor connection. A warm, natural materials palette defines both the exterior and interior, the latter of which is fitted with custom-designed cabinetry and play equipment for a cohesive feel. Steel beams and posts were minimally incorporated into the building’s timber envelope so as to minimize the center’s overall carbon footprint. In addition to a high-performance envelope that minimizes heat loss, the architects oriented the building for solar gains in winter and natural shading and thermal mass cooling in summer. + Collingridge and Smith Architects Photography by Mark Scowen via Collingridge and Smith Architects

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Early learning center sustainably embraces rural New Zealand

Bioclimatic design creates a highly efficient and healthy home in Spain

November 20, 2019 by  
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Spain’s Rías Baixas area is a picturesque part of the country. Now, in this idyllic region sits a highly energy-efficient home designed by local firm ARKKE . The architects incorporated several bioclimatic features into the design, taking advantage of the local climate and landscape to help reduce the building’s energy use. The Small Bioclimatic House is a compact, two-bedroom home that sits elevated on a steep hill side overlooking the Ría de Arousa, the largest estuary in Galicia. The area is known for its picturesque landscape dotted with quaint fishing villages, so the architects wanted to create an energy-efficient home that harmonizes with the surroundings and complements the existing vernacular. Related: Brazilian timber home uses bioclimatic principles to reduce its environmental footprint The home is just over 900 square feet and is surrounded by natural landscaping. According to the architects, the layout and size of the house was inspired by the limited building space as well as the stunning views. The firm explained, “The essential premise of the commission was to design a small, highly efficient and healthy house capable of making the most of a very narrow plot but with delicious views of the Arosa estuary.” The architects created a simple, one-story design with two bedrooms, a living room, an open kitchen and a bathroom. The front wall is comprised of floor-to-ceiling windows that open up to a front deck; this helps the family to enjoy optimal natural light as well as unobstructed views year-round. To create a strong thermal envelope for the home, the architects chose to build with CLT . The porch extends laterally, forming eaves that shade the interiors from direct solar radiation, again reducing the home’s energy use. Additionally, the entire envelope has been insulated with a unique exterior insulation system (SATE) to withstand both the region’s frigid winters and the searing summer months. + ARKKE Via ArchDaily Images via ARKKE

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Bioclimatic design creates a highly efficient and healthy home in Spain

A vacant lot in New Orleans is converted into resilient and affordable housing for war veterans

July 2, 2019 by  
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New Orleans-based firm Office of Jonathan Tate has unveiled a modern residential complex for combat veterans and their families. Located in the Gentilly district of the city, the Bastion Community is comprised of 29 two-unit apartment buildings laid out specifically in a way to foster social interaction. Additionally, considering the area’s history for severe flooding, the development was constructed with several resilient features . Located on a formerly vacant lot that spans 6.4 acres, the Bastion Community is now a vibrant residential complex comprising 29 apartment buildings, each containing two units. Within the development, there are various one-, two- or three-bedroom options, ranging from 720 square feet to 1,200 square feet. Related: BIG completes low-income “Homes for All” project in Copenhagen Already known locally for creating modern but affordable housing complexes, the architects specifically designed the Bastion Community to be a “protected but inclusive and thriving live-work environment” for post-9/11 combat veterans and their families. The layout of the homes as well as the on-site community and wellness center were part of a strategy to create a strong sense of community for those who often feel isolated. The homes are uniform in their design, which includes pitched roofs, pale exterior tones and wooden fencing. All units were built to be adapted to be ADA accessible . Considering the location has a long history of flooding , resiliency was at the forefront of the design. All of the structures are elevated off the landscape via concrete piers to allow flood waters to flow freely under the buildings without causing harm. Additionally, landscaping and building strategies for filtering, storing and returning water to the soil were also incorporated into the design. In addition to their resiliency, the apartments were designed to be sustainable and durable for years to come. Tight insulation and high-performance HVAC equipment were used to cut energy costs, and there are tentative plans to install solar panels in the future. Each unit has high vaulted ceilings and operable windows to allow for natural air ventilation. + Office of Jonathan Tate Via Dezeen Photography by William Crocker and aerial photography by Jackson Hill

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A vacant lot in New Orleans is converted into resilient and affordable housing for war veterans

Michael Jantzen’s Solar Winds Desert Hotel proposal utilizes sun and wind for power

January 5, 2011 by  
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Eco Factor: Sustainable hotel proposal designed to be powered by renewable sources of energy. The brainchild of architect and designer Michael Jantzen , the Solar Winds Desert Hotel is a conceptual design for a large luxury eco hotel that is powered by solar and wind energy

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Michael Jantzen’s Solar Winds Desert Hotel proposal utilizes sun and wind for power

New Jersey Schools Must Incorporate Solar Power

October 26, 2010 by  
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Just yesterday I covered the groundbreaking of the largest northeastern U.S. solar farm, which is being built in the Sunshine Garden State, New Jersey. Now, I’ve got even more great solar news coming out of New Jersey.

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New Jersey Schools Must Incorporate Solar Power

Self-sustaining Eco-Sushi House by Michael Jantzen

April 10, 2010 by  
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Eco Factor: Sustainable architecture designed to run on renewable solar and wind energy. The Eco-Sushi House by eco-conscious designer Michael Jantzen explore ways in which to create new and exciting architectural art aesthetic for commercial structures.

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Self-sustaining Eco-Sushi House by Michael Jantzen

Self-Sufficient Streetlight aims to make highways green

April 10, 2010 by  
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Eco Factor: Sustainable streetlights powered by solar energy. The amount of electricity that is consumed by streetlights installed to keep highways safe after dark is staggering.

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Self-Sufficient Streetlight aims to make highways green

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