A run-down property in Portugal gets a playful renovation using a blend of colors and patterns

January 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The inventive  renovation of this house in Ovar, Portugal, balances the past and the present by connecting the main residence with a newer addition using playful patterns and colors. Architect Nelson Resende Arquitecto  turned the crumbling, traditional home into a modern multi-use space with plenty of charm by drawing in light, adding modern finishes and highlighting the original features of the home. The house is located in the city of Ovar in Portugal, on a lot bordering the access road, abutting against the adjacent buildings. The secondary structure and the main house itself are treated distinctly, with the main residence featuring larger rooms. The spaces in the secondary structure are more constrained. Related: Architects convert 150-year-old Lisbon building into an artisanal green studio The architect decided that the main building should house the living areas and common spaces, with the street-facing part of the secondary structure converted into a garage and the inward-facing section reserved for private use, service and storage spaces . The attic in the main building is a multipurpose space bathed in natural light . The architect used beautiful decorative tiles for the facades and wood in the interior, blending traditional design with modern functions. + Nelson Resende Arquitecto Photos by João Morgado

View post:
A run-down property in Portugal gets a playful renovation using a blend of colors and patterns

The majority of the National Park Service board just resigned

January 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The majority of the 12-person National Park System Advisory Board (NPSAB) resigned this week because President Donald Trump’s Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke was unwilling to meet with them, according to NPR . Democrat Tony Knowles, former governor of Alaska, said in a resignation letter “…from all of the events of this past year I have a profound concern that the mission of stewardship, protection, and advancement of our National Parks has been set aside.” The National Park Service (NPS) advisory board was first authorized in 1935, and today more than three-quarters of its members have left their seats. In the January 15 letter Knowles said that he will remain dedicated to the success of America’s national parks, but “For the last year we have stood by waiting for the chance to meet and continue the partnership between the NPSAB and the DOI [Department of the Interior] as prescribed by law. We understand the complexity of transition but our requests to engage have been ignored and the matters on which we wanted to brief the new Department team are clearly not part of its agenda.” Related: Ryan Zinke recommends shrinking two more national monuments Nine board members signed that letter, and all of their terms were set to expire in May. Today a tenth member – whose term doesn’t expire until 2021 – resigned as well. Project Concern International CEO Carolyn Hessler Radelet submitted a similar letter to Zinke. According to The Washington Post , this move means the federal government lacks a functioning body to “designate national historic or natural landmarks.” The publication said it also shows how federal advisory bodies have been marginalized in Trump’s administration . Zinke suspended outside committees back in May of last year for his staff to review their work. Interior spokesperson Heather Swift said boards restarted in an email to The Washington Post earlier this month, but didn’t provide other details. The two people remaining on the board at this time are University of Maryland professor Rita Colwell and Harvard University professor Linda Blimes, who told The Washington Post she didn’t resign as she’s currently conducting research funded by the National Park Foundation and wants to finish. Their terms are up in May. Via NPR and The Washington Post (1 , 2 , 3) Images by Casey Horner on Unsplash , Gage Skidmore on Flickr and NPS

See the original post here: 
The majority of the National Park Service board just resigned

Melbourne architects turn an old terrace house into a gorgeous light-filled home

January 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Melbourne-based Ben Callery Architects converted a compact terrace house with limited square footage into a contemporary, light-filled home by going upwards and outwards. The renovation introduced a large rooftop deck, and natural light floods the interior, providing a strong connection with the outdoors. The Beyond House also takes advantage of a number of sustainable features including passive heating and cooling, solar power , water harvesting, and repurposed materials. The old row home was previously cramped in between two walls with little light, but by bringing the home design upwards, the architects were able to outfit the top level with a gorgeous open-air deck that allows the homeowners to enjoy a private outdoor space. Although adding this indoor/outdoor connection to the home was imperative to the renovation, the owners were also focused on creating a strong sustainability portfolio for their new home. Related: Low-impact Abbotsford Eco House uses recycled materials wherever possible in Melbourne “The owners are serious about sustainability and wanted the new addition to be naturally comfortable, using the sun for heating, breezes for cooling, water harvesting, solar power, recycled materials (even re-using the old kitchen),” the architects said. “We looked beyond the site constraints and beyond the typical spatial boundaries within a terrace house’s rooms and levels.” The strong connection to the outdoors continues throughout the interior, which was outfitted with strategically placed windows to bring in as much natural light to the living space as possible. In fact, every room in the house has a floor-to-ceiling glass door that provides optimal light, further fusing the indoor with the outdoor. + Ben Callery Architects Via Freshome Photography by Peter Bennetts via Ben Callery Architects

View post:
Melbourne architects turn an old terrace house into a gorgeous light-filled home

Huge factory turned into a cozy residence with plenty of room leftover for the residents’ hobbies

January 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

This former factory in Nobeoka, Japan, now functions as a modern home for a couple who wanted to preserve the industrial legacy of the building. Considering the fact that the building was large enough to house production and manufacturing facilities, Schemata Architects reorganized the layout to include several voids that will serve as areas where the owners can enjoy their future hobbies. The building occupies a corner lot in Nobeoka, Miyazaki Prefecture in Japan . It grew over time to reach its current total area of 4736 square feet (440 square meters) distributed across two floors. The project started as an initiative organized by a Japanese magazine BRUTUS, which invited readers who wanted to renovate their houses as well as several selected architects, and matched each reader to their favorite architect. Related: Tokyo factory is transformed into an industrial-chic Blue Bottle Coffee cafe Schemata Architects renovated the building working in close collaboration with the client and his wife, who wanted the project to preserve the history of the building. In discussing the design, the team reached the conclusion that the optimal size of the residential part would be as small as 1829 square feet (170 square meters). This meant that there was a large unused floor area that had to somehow be incorporated into the concept. They decided to keep these spaces as voids that will accommodate the clients’ future passions and hobbies. “Such voids, created somewhere between the interior and the building envelope , generate a dynamic space that raises expectations for something to happen,” said the architects. + Schemata Architects Photos by Takumi Ota

The rest is here: 
Huge factory turned into a cozy residence with plenty of room leftover for the residents’ hobbies

Solar-powered Miami office is made entirely from repurposed shipping containers

January 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Argentina-based Reale Arquitectos just unveiled plans for a stunning office building made completely out of shipping containers . Currently under construction in Miami, the contemporary structure is made out of four repurposed containers strategically configured to give the building plenty of open spaces and great ocean views. In addition to the shipping containers, the project take advantage of a variety of green building strategies including solar power and a rainwater harvesting system. Since its inception, the project focused on combining sophisticated design with sustainable systems . The use of repurposed shipping containers cuts down on building and transportation costs. Additional sustainable features include water heating panels, garden terraces, and a greywater harvesting system . The building also features interior and exterior LED lighting as well as energy-efficient appliances. Related: Affordable shipping container village can pop up almost anywhere in the world To fit into the Miami landscape, the containers were painted a stark white, which also helps with passive cooling. The strategic placement of the containers provides the interior with beautiful views of the Miami shoreline, as well as optimal natural light throughout the interior. The configuration was also pivotal in providing the building with a number of outdoor garden spaces for relaxing, working, or entertaining. + Reale Arquitectos Images via Reale Arquitectos

More here:
Solar-powered Miami office is made entirely from repurposed shipping containers

Ford’s new electric SUV will battle Tesla’s Model X

January 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Over the past few days, Ford has released lots of new information about its future lineup at the Detroit Auto Show. While our eyes were on its latest trucks and even a new Mustang, the automaker quietly dropped some information about its new electric SUV that’s slated to arrive in 2020. In a tweet, Ford posted a quick teaser video with the end of it announcing that the new SUV will be called the Mach 1. Mach 1 isn’t a new name: its roots go back to the 1960s when it was introduced as a performance package for the 1969 Mustang. The decision to use the name for its new electric SUV alludes to the performance that Ford expects from the vehicle. Rather than create en electric crossover, like the Chevy Bolt or upcoming Hyundai Kona EV , Ford is going at it from the other end of the spectrum with a high performance SUV that will rival the Tesla Model X. Related: Hyundai unveils new Nexo fuel cell SUV with an impressive 370-mile range Inspired by icons. Developed by #Ford Team Edison. Born in Detroit. A new all-electric performance SUV. Coming 2020. #FordNAIAS pic.twitter.com/DqFSRAtp8l — Ford Motor Company (@Ford) January 14, 2018 Other than the teaser video, Ford hasn’t released any other details about the Mach 1. When it does arrive in 2020, it will already have a long list of new rivals, including Jaguar’s I-Pace , Audi’s e-tron SUVs and maybe even an electric Porsche SUV. + Twitter All images ©Ford

Read more from the original source:
Ford’s new electric SUV will battle Tesla’s Model X

Charred timber home perched above Silicon Valley takes cues from nature

January 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

High above Silicon Valley sits a striking home with a two-story volume clad in blackened cedar. Schwartz and Architecture designed the residence, named Shou Sugi Ban House after the traditional Japanese method used to burn the wood to wrap it in a layer of carbon highly resistant to water, fire, and mold. The charred timber volume is an extension to an existing one-story home, the interior of which was also substantially remodeled by the architects. Located on the crest of a hill in Los Gatos, California, Shou Sugi Ban House is a 4,350-square-foot renovation and expansion project that takes inspiration from the surrounding landscape, including the texture and look of boulders, bark, and leaves. “Enlarging an existing home that has an already strong and complete architectural character can be challenging,” wrote the architects. “Here, we anchor the existing one-story home with a new two-story independent volume, using it both as punctuation mark and counterpoint to the existing composition. We clad the addition in traditional Japanese Shou Sugi Ban burnt cedar siding both to anchor home with site and to create the visual weight necessary to anchor the existing exuberantly-roofed horizontal building.” Related: Stunning Lake Michigan home is built from dying ash reclaimed onsite In contrast to the extension’s dark facade, the airy interior features whitewashed walls with natural textures applied throughout. A family room occupies the lower level while a bedroom is placed upstairs. Views of the outdoors are framed through large full-height glazing making it feel as if the interior is open to the outdoors. A particularly beautiful feature of the new extension is the minimalist floating staircase made of painted-steel and cantilevered walnut treads that the architects liken to leaves growing on a branch. + Schwartz and Architecture Images via Matthew Millman

Go here to read the rest:
Charred timber home perched above Silicon Valley takes cues from nature

This striking art studio was inspired by the movement of butterfly wings

January 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This striking art studio was inspired by the movement of butterfly wings

New York-based firm Valerie Schweitzer Architects has created a funky backyard art studio inspired by the movement of butterfly wings. The 350-square-foot Butterfly Studio comprises multiple volumes that fit together at various angles. The studio is clad in a mix of stucco and reclaimed teak , interrupted by a series of long, narrow windows, giving the project a warm yet industrial character. The compact studio is a beautiful composition of glass, wood and steel. The angled volumes that make up the structure are topped with an expansive skylight of thermally-insulated glass. Allowing the optimal amount of natural light to enter the studio, the skylight all but eliminates the need for artificial lighting, even for an artist. Strategically placed windows provide cross ventilation that captures the breeze off nearby Long Island Sound. A sealed poured concrete flooring contains radiant heat piping, which also adds to the design’s energy efficiency. Related: Prefabricated garden retreat snaps together in less than a week The multi-faceted design was created to provide a strong sense of privacy for anyone working on the studio interior , but without being overly isolated. The windows provide light and a sense of openness on the interior, resulting in an optimal space for artistic production. + Valerie Schweitzer Architects Via v2com Newswire Photography by Tom Leighton

Read more:
This striking art studio was inspired by the movement of butterfly wings

Architects create exquisite home addition out of reclaimed barn wood and local stone

January 2, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Architects create exquisite home addition out of reclaimed barn wood and local stone

Montana-based JLF Architects recently updated a gorgeous home in Jackson Hole with a spacious addition built out of reclaimed barn wood and local stone. The home design is straight out of a fairy tale, with rustic wood paneling and a glass-enclosed interior walkway leading from one end of the existing structure to its new extension. The home is located deep in the Teton Pines community, surrounded by thick forest. The homeowners were looking to add space to host visiting family during the summer and holidays, but they wanted to retain the existing home’s aesthetic. Working with local firm, Big-D Signature , JLF Architects created a design that would enhance the home’s size, but without sacrificing its beautiful rustic character. Related: Dilapidated 1800s dairy barn resurrected into a stunning home in Wyoming According to the architects, the design was focused on extending the original design rather than adding on an independent addition, “Our design-build approach allowed our team to look at the design of this home holistically to create continuity and quality within the architecture,” explains JLF Architects principal Logan Leachman. To find the appropriate materials, the architects searched various local log yards for reclaimed timber and stone that would match the original structure. Luckily, they found Montana moss rock and rough-sawn fir panels as well as 20th-century chestnut hardwood floors, all of which were used in the construction of the 700-square-foot addition. To connect the old space with the new addition, partners Big-D Signature crafted a beautiful glass entryway that connects the two structures. The glass walls allow for natural light to flood the interior and provides some seriously stunning views of the natural surroundings. The walkway is bookended by two stone walls that, along with the glass and timber passageway, brings the exterior into the interior. + JLF Architects + Big-D Signature

Go here to see the original:
Architects create exquisite home addition out of reclaimed barn wood and local stone

Trump plan to reduce marine monuments could put vital ecosystems at risk

January 2, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Trump plan to reduce marine monuments could put vital ecosystems at risk

A report from United States Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke recommends shrinking three ocean monuments and opening them up to commercial fishing . The monuments, two in the Pacific Ocean and one in the Atlantic Ocean , are undersea treasures, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s administrator between 2009 and 2013, Jane Lubchenco, who told The Guardian , “These ‘blue parks’ harbor unique species, a wealth of biodiversity , and special habitats.” President Donald Trump may not just take aim at land-based national monuments , but at the following three marine monuments. The over 490,500-square-mile Pacific Remote Islands monument, created by George W. Bush and expanded by Barack Obama, includes largely untouched coral reefs and is “the last refugia for fish and wildlife species rapidly vanishing from the remainder of the planet,” per the Fish & Wildlife Service . The 10,156 square mile Rose Atoll monument “protects diverse marine ecosystems and the millions of wildlife dependent upon the Central Pacific.” And the 4,913 square mile Northeast Canyons and Seamounts monument is the United States’ only protected area in the Atlantic Ocean, featuring underwater mountains and canyons, deep-sea coral, and endangered whales and sea turtles. Related: Patagonia is suing the Trump administration over Bears Ears: “The President Stole Your Land” In his report Zinke said, “While early monument designations focused more on geological formations, archaeological ruins, and areas of historical interest, a more recent and broad interpretation of what constitutes an ‘object of historic or scientific interest’ has been extended to include landscape areas, biodiversity, and viewsheds.” Fishing organizations aren’t always pleased about the monuments. In March, a New England coalition sued the federal government over fears fishers would be out of a job due to the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts monument. The challenge is based on the idea Obama exceeded his authority in designating the monument. Conservation groups worry activities like seabed mining or oil drilling could be next if monuments are opened for fishing. Pew Charitable Trusts Director of U.S. Oceans, Northeast Peter Baker told The Guardian, “It shouldn’t be too much to ask to protect two percent of the U.S.’s exclusive economic zone off the Atlantic coast for future generations.” Lubchenco said, “Creation of highly protected blue parks like these monuments is beginning to re-establish the all-important balance of places to be used and places to be treasured. We need both.” Via The Guardian Images via USFWS – Pacific Region on Flickr and NOAA photo by Hatsue Bailey

Read the original here: 
Trump plan to reduce marine monuments could put vital ecosystems at risk

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 916 access attempts in the last 7 days.