Episode 246: Celebrating the sustainability profession, the ‘clean fight’

November 20, 2020 by  
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Episode 246: Celebrating the sustainability profession, the ‘clean fight’ Heather Clancy Fri, 11/20/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (3:45). Joe Biden’s environmental priorities: The first 100 days How circular cities can put people first With these emerging leaders, building the future of the clean economy starts now Features The New York clean energy scene (14:40)   We chat with two executives representing The Clean Fight NYC, a building decarbonization initiative led by New Energy Nexus and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Insights from Kate Frucher, managing director of The Clean Fight, and John Hoekstra, global vice president of sustainability and cleantech at Schneider Electric.  Optimizing tires for EVs (27:10)   Goodyear Chief Technology Officer Chris Helsel talks about how the giant tire manufacturer is prioritizing design for electric vehicles, which have different weight and acceleration requirements than counterparts for gas-powered cars, trucks and vans. Under pressure: What’s influencing corporate ESG strategy (30:45)   A trifecta of factors — the COVID-19 pandemic, racial inequity and hyper-partisan politics — are reshaping how companies think about environmental, social and governance issues. GreenBiz and EDF+Business at the Environment Defense Fund are teaming on research to track those pressures. GreenBiz Vice President and Senior Analyst John Davies and EDF+Business Vice President Tom Murray weigh in on the data. Celebrating climate professionals young and old-er (39:15)   Nov. 24 marks the inaugural Day of the Climate Professional, dedicated to recognizing those who have dedicated their careers to working on climate action . Joel Makower chats with Steven Carlson, U.S. lead for the organizing group Youth Climate Leaders.  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “Southside,” “More On That Later,” “Night Caves,” “New Day,” Sad Marimba Planet,” “I’m Going For A Coffee” and “As I Was Saying” *This episode was sponsored by Salesforce Resources galore Say ‘hy-drogen’ to a decarbonized future. Our latest energy transition webcast at 1 p.m. EST Dec. 8 explores the potential for green hydrogen technologies, with experts from Shell, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Green Hydrogen Coalition. Sign up here . Recycling’s makeover, courtesy of AI and robotics. New technologies are solving logistics logjams and making it simpler to sort more materials. Join the discussion at 1 p.m. EST Dec. 10.  Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Topics Podcast Jobs & Careers Buildings Transportation & Mobility Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 46:01 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 246: Celebrating the sustainability profession, the ‘clean fight’

Converging crises call for converging solutions

November 20, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Converging crises call for converging solutions Sarah Golden Fri, 11/20/2020 – 01:45 In the words of President-elect Joe Biden, America is facing four historic colliding crises: the economy; a pandemic; systemic racism; and climate chaos.  These aren’t four separate asteroids all coincidentally headed our way at once. They’re intertwined and part of the same challenges; they’re the consequence of decades of actions and inactions that are boiling over and activating one another. It stands to reason that we couldn’t silo solutions.  Perversely, it is possible that economic crises will be the catalyst we need to address climate change. That’s because the problems have the same solution: the rapid deployment of clean technologies across the economy.  COVID, the economy and emissions As the world pressed pause this spring in an attempt to flatten the coronavirus curve, our emissions curve flattened, too. We conducted a science experiment on a historic scale: What happens to emissions when everyone (or a large majority of people) stands still?  As the year rounds to a close, the results are becoming clear: We’re on track to reduce carbon emissions from energy by 8 percent.  While significant, I am surprised that the emission reductions are so small. It reflects the limits of individual action; even if we all do everything we can, the built-in emissions to our economy still will bust our carbon budget. America is at its best — most collaborative, innovative and productive — when we have a shared enemy and objective. More distressing is the projection of emissions as our economy recovers. According to Bloomberg New Energy Finance’s New Energy Outlook , carbon emissions are set to rise through 2027, then decline 0.7 percent per year through 2050. That would put the world on track for 3.3 degrees Celsius of warming.  In order to have a chance at 2 C warming, emissions would need to decrease 10 times faster. If we’re striving for 1.5 C warming (and we are), emissions will need to drop fourteenfold faster.  We can rebuild the economy without ramping up emissions Historically, emissions and the economy are closely related. It makes sense; when people have more money, they tend to use more energy, travel more, buy more things. Likewise, the only three times emissions fell between 1975 and 2015 were during the recessions of the 1980s, 1992 and 2009. And when the economy rebounded, so did emissions .  Climate skeptics have weaponized this correlation to frame the economy and the environment as trade-offs.  But thanks to clean energy, this relationship is no longer true. In 2016, the International Energy Agency confirmed that emissions and economic growth have decoupled. For the first time in more than 40 years, global GDP grew in 2014 and 2015 — but emissions didn’t.  That’s great news for this moment; the work we need to do to decarbonize is the same work that can pull us out of a global recession. Building a new type of future  The concept of a Green New Deal predates the COVID crises. Yet the harkening to the New Deal, the massive federal effort to pull America out of the depths of the Great Depression, feels prescient as we reckon with the worst economy in a century.  And it may be the urgency to address the faltering economy that spurs the necessary policy alignment to reach true decarbonization.  The numbers are there. Columbia’s Center on Global Energy Policy released a report in September making the case for investment in clean energy R&D to create jobs and boost the economy, and Bill Gates’ Breakthrough Energy commissioned a report to analyze the spillover economic gains from such an investment. Saul Griffith’s new organization, Rewiring America , shows how decarbonizing the economy would require around 25 million jobs in the U.S.  While the New Deal did wonders for the economy, it arguably had elements that lacked a strategic lens. Case in point: The Bureau of Reclamation damming every river it could in the west, regardless whether it was justified. Imagine what would be possible with a New Deal that has a guiding principle: rapid decarbonization.  America is at its best — most collaborative, innovative and productive — when we have a shared enemy and objective. Climate change, for reasons I don’t understand, proves to be a difficult unifier. But the economy — now that’s something Americans can get behind.  This essay first appeared in GreenBiz’s newsletter Energy Weekly, running Thursdays. Subscribe here . Pull Quote America is at its best — most collaborative, innovative and productive — when we have a shared enemy and objective. Topics Energy & Climate Racial Issues COVID-19 Clean Economy Featured Column Power Points Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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Episode 245: How President-elect Joe Biden could help U.S. farmers

November 13, 2020 by  
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Episode 245: How President-elect Joe Biden could help U.S. farmers Heather Clancy Fri, 11/13/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (6:25). Linking S with E in the renewable energy sector How tenants continue to press for greener commercial buildings, despite COVID-19 7 ways to bridge the blue finance gap to protect the oceans Features How companies can engage authentically with communities (18:20)   Highlights from our VERGE 20 mainstage conversation with environmental justice leaders Rahwa Ghirmatzion, executive director of People United for Sustainable Housing (PUSH), and Elizabeth Yeampierre, executive director of UPROSE. There’s no one formula, but it starts with being transparent and willing to listen. How President-elect Joe Biden could support regenerative agriculture, Black farmers (24:45)   What would those focused on sustainable food systems like the incoming administration to prioritize? For a start, the U.S. Department of Agriculture could use existing funding and programs to encourage soil health. Plus, let’s see better support for the Black farming community. GreenBiz Food Analyst Jim Giles weighs in with suggestions.   *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Here’s the Thing,” “Waiting for the Moment That Never Comes” and “Knowing the Truth” *This episode was sponsored by Shell Resources galore Behavior change and the circular economy. How innovation and new business models alter people’s relationship with waste. Join the discussion at 8 p.m. EST Nov. 12.  Missing pieces of decarbonization. Join us for a discussion on how 100 percent renewable power can practically, affordably and quickly become a reality. Register for this webcast at 1 p.m. EST Nov. 19. Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Jim Giles Topics Podcast Policy & Politics VERGE 20 Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 35:11 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 245: How President-elect Joe Biden could help U.S. farmers

Episode 242: Responsible mining, the politics of clean energy

October 23, 2020 by  
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Episode 242: Responsible mining, the politics of clean energy Heather Clancy Fri, 10/23/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (7:25). Microsoft, Tiffany help carve out new responsible mining standard Green 2.0: Corporate advocacy and the environmental movement’s racial justice reckoning How big-time investors think about deforestation: Q&A with investment manager Lauren Compere Features 5 questions with renewable fuels company Neste (20:40)   Jeremy Baines took on his role as president of Neste U.S. a little more than a year ago. He joins us to answer five questions about the organization’s strategy. The clean energy voting bloc (27:50)   GreenBiz senior energy analyst Sarah Golden offers an inside view to Clean Energy for Biden, which is raising visibility for the economic potential of clean energy industries ahead of the presidential election.  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “More On That Later,” “Night Caves,” “New Day,” “Curiosity” and “Sad Marimba Planet” *This episode was sponsored by WestRock and MCE, and features VERGE 20 sponsor Neste. Resources galore Lessons in resilience from the produce industry. Subject matter experts from Kwik Lok, Walmart and Second Harvest Food Bank join us at 1 p.m. EST Nov. 10 to discuss responding to disruption and how to balance food safety and security to minimize food waste. Behavior change and the circular economy. How innovation and new business models alter people’s relationship with waste. Join the discussion at 8 p.m. EST Nov. 12.  Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Sarah Golden Topics Podcast Renewable Energy Supply Chain Policy & Politics Mining Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 37:26 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 242: Responsible mining, the politics of clean energy

Episode 240: Ceres points the way, Beautycounter’s mica makeover

October 9, 2020 by  
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Episode 240: Ceres points the way, Beautycounter’s mica makeover Heather Clancy Fri, 10/09/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (4:20). SEC rule change stifles key risk signal, disenfranchises retail investors Why Kroger and Publix are bringing the farm to the grocery store Demand for voluntary carbon offsets holds strong Features All the glitters: Beautycounter and the mica supply chain (17:30)   Outakes from the reporting behind Joel Makower’s two-part series about the mica supply chain and retailer Beautycounter’s work to address the sector’s big child labor problem. You can read both stories here and here . A corporate climate action plan, Ceres style (30:55) We chat with Kristen Lang, senior director of the Ceres Corporate Networks about the new Corporate Roadmap 2030 , a blueprint for strategy, policy action and systems change. *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “Waiting for the Moment That Never Comes,” “Knowing the Truth,” “As I Was Saying” and “Southside” *This episode was sponsored by Amazon and WestRock Resources galore Innovation in textiles. The global fashion industry is looking toward innovative materials and strategies. Learn more about what’s possible in this interactive discussion at 1 p.m. EDT Oct. 13. The social side of energy procurement. How to add considerations for equity and biodiversity into renewables procurement? Join the discussion at 1 p.m. EDT Oct. 15. Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Topics Supply Chain Podcast Corporate Strategy Mining Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 44:41 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 240: Ceres points the way, Beautycounter’s mica makeover

Episode 239: Wildfires and resilience, California’s car ban

October 2, 2020 by  
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Episode 239: Wildfires and resilience, California’s car ban Heather Clancy Fri, 10/02/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:15). 5 things to know about California’s gas car sales ban Cities should track emissions from the goods they import Missing ingredients: How to accelerate the meat alternatives revolution Features Riffing on transportation trends (11:30)   What’s the buzz in the work of fleet management? HIghlights from last week’s transportation and mobility track at Climate Week, selected by GreenBiz analyst Katie Fehrenbacher, with insights from IKEA CSO Pia Heidenmark Cook and BT Group Chief Digital Impact and Sustainability Officer Andy Wales.  The new world of wildfire management (17:15) In September, the Almeda Fire ripped through the Rogue Valley in Oregon, decimating two towns: Talent and Phoenix. This was not an ordinary wildfire, nor could it have been prevented by traditional forestry management. GreenBiz analyst Sarah Golden speaks with state senator Jeff Golden (her father) about the climate change influence and what’s next for improving resilience.  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “More on That Later,” “Night Caves,” “I’m Going for a Coffee” and “Here’s the Thing” *This episode was sponsored by Amazon and MCE Resources galore Partnerships for packaging . How working together advances low-cost, circular solutions. Register for the webcast at 1 p.m. Oct. 6.  Innovation in textiles. The global fashion industry is looking toward innovative materials and strategies. Learn more about what’s possible in this interactive discussion at 1 p.m. EDT Oct. 13. Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Katie Fehrenbacher Sarah Golden Topics Energy & Climate Podcast Transportation & Mobility Electric Vehicles Zero Emissions Resilience Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 31:23 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 239: Wildfires and resilience, California’s car ban

Episode 235: The value of informal waste collectors, reusable packaging prevails

September 4, 2020 by  
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Episode 235: The value of informal waste collectors, reusable packaging prevails Heather Clancy Fri, 09/04/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (4:08). It’s time to value waste collectors for their pivotal role in the plastic supply chain What does “climate risk” actually mean ? 7 tips for companies developing reusable packaging Features Mainstage highlights from Circularity 20 (15:30) Last week, GreenBiz hosted Circularity 20, the largest North American conference focused on circular economy issues. We’ll be posting videos for many sessions in mid-September. Meanwhile, here are highlights from five mainstage speakers.  Circularity and equity in cities:  Mark Chambers, director of the mayor’s office of sustainability for New York, and Jose Manuel Moller Dominguez, founder and CEO of Algramo, comment on how brands can participate in motivating systemic change. The human dimension of waste collection: Bharati Chaturvedi, founder and director of the Chintan Environmental Research and Action Group in India, and Kieran Smith, co-founder and CEO of Mr. Green Africa, discuss why informal collectors of plastics and recyclables should embrace within formal supply chains — and how to do it. Creative disruption:  Design thinker TIm Brown, chair of IDEA, discusses the two major models that catalyze systems change. Thoughts on leadership (25:37) Trista Bridges and Donald Eubank, co-founders and principals of consultancy Read the Air, chat about their new book, “Leading Sustainably: The Path to Sustainable Business and how the SDGs Change Everything.” You can read an excerpt here .  The state of composting (37:38) What is so much food still sent to landfills when it could be used for energy or to fertilize crops? Nora Goldstein, editor of Biocycle, chats about the U.S. composting infrastructure.  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “As I Was Saying,” “Southside,” “And So Then,” “Here’s the Thing,” “Curiosity” and “More On That Later” *This episode was sponsored by Amazon Resources galore Greentech on the red sea. How do we innovate our way out of the climate crisis? Three professors from Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah University of Science and Technology discussing promising solutions in energy and water. Join the webcast at 1 p.m. EDT Sept. 8. Today’s carbon-negative fuel. Exploring the potential for fleet emissions reductions through renewable natural gas. Register here for the discussion at 1 p.m. EDT Sept. 10. ESG values and a sustainable future.  Why placing environment, social and governance principles at the center of COVID-19 recovery places makes sense for resilience and the bottom line. Sign up for the interactive session at 1 p.m. EDT Sept. 15. Action plus ambition. How leading companies, including Microsoft, approach audacious sustainability goals. Register for the discussion at 1 p.m. EDT Sept. 17.  Safety and performance in recycled plastics. UL and HP Inc. share strategies and insights in this conversation at 1 p.m. EDT Sept. 22. Inside The Climate Pledge. Senior executives from Amazon, Global Optimism and Verizon share insights on why collaborative corporate action on the climate crisis is more critical than ever. Join us during Climate Week at noon EDT Sept. 24. Clean air in California?  It’s easier than you think. Hear from the California Air Resources Board, the city of Oakland and Neste in this session at 1 p.m. EDT Oct. 1. State of the Profession. Our sixth report examining the evolving role of corporate sustainability leaders. Download it here . The State of Green Business 2020. Our 13th annual analysis of key metrics and trends published here . Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Jim Giles Deonna Anderson Topics Podcast Circular Economy Corporate Strategy Circularity 20 Risk Finance Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 46:31 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 235: The value of informal waste collectors, reusable packaging prevails

Ultra-modern ski chalet pays homage to Ontario’s traditional farmhouses

March 7, 2019 by  
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Toronto-based Atelier Kastelic Buffey has unveiled a beautiful family ski chalet tucked into a winter wonderland landscape surrounded by Ontario’s Blue Mountains. Although the black and white Alta Chalet boasts a thoroughly modern aesthetic, the home’s extreme pitched roof was inspired by the area’s traditional farmhouse vernacular. The design also boasts a number of sustainable features such as a high-performance glazing system, ultra-tight insulation and natural air ventilation. Located in a private ski club, the massive 3,000-square-foot Alta Chalet was designed for a family of five who love the outdoors. When first approached by the clients, the designers were intent on avoiding the typical ski chalet aesthetic, instead opting for a home that would pay homage to its farmhouse history . The project was also inspired by the area’s idyllic natural surroundings. Related: Gorgeous prefab cabin is embedded into the mountainous Norwegian landscape “Alta Chalet communicates an ethos of contemporary design and elegant detailing that derives from the local vernacular tradition of the barn,” the architects explained. “Its iconic presence — defined by a reductive black-and-white color scheme and a tight, clean, gabled roof edge — complements the intelligence of its spatial and economic efficiency.” The home’s exterior is clad in jet black and bright white siding. Various blocks make up the ski chalet’s volume, which is marked by a large gable roof that looms over the lower volumes. The interior space, marked by white walls and wooden finishes, was designed with the family in mind. The open-concept kitchen, dining and living area is minimalist , but a strategic interior design scheme helps provide a welcoming living space that is perfect for both enjoying family time and entertaining guests. The home also has a south-facing outdoor deck to enjoy the crisp cold air while taking in the amazing views. Due to the extreme climate, the architects also focused on making the home as energy-efficient and resilient as possible. The ski chalet is wrapped in a low-maintenance, pre-finished Canadian pine siding and is heavily insulated to withstand the area’s frigid temperatures. Additionally, the home’s many windows are comprised of high-performance glazing in order to reduce energy loss. Along with a pleasant wood-burning fireplace, a hydronic in-floor heating system keeps the living spaces warm and toasty year-round. + Atelier Kastelic Buffey Via Freshome Photography by Shai Gil via Atelier Kastelic Buffey

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Ultra-modern ski chalet pays homage to Ontario’s traditional farmhouses

Mike Pence says America will send humans back to the moon

October 9, 2017 by  
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Humankind took steps on the moon for the first time in 1969, and now vice president Mike Pence says it’s time to go back. He penned an opinion editorial piece for The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) stating “America will lead in space again,” and also spoke on the topic at the first meeting of the revived National Space Council in Virginia at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. This isn’t the first time Pence has hinted at a return to the moon. He talked about the idea back in July at the Kennedy Space Center. At the National Space Council meeting, he said, “We will return NASA astronauts to the Moon – not only to leave behind footprints and flags, but to build the foundation, we need to send Americans to Mars and beyond.” Related: Pence vows America will put ‘boots on the face of Mars’ in near future The Verge pointed out this would mark a shift for NASA , which since 2010 has concentrated on sending humans to Mars without a return to the moon. They said the goal of a presence on the moon surface is a return to President George W. Bush’s vision . Pence described the move to go back as a vital strategic goal, saying NASA should refocus on human exploration and discovery. NASA acting administrator Robert Lightfoot said in a statement , “The National Space Council acknowledged the strategic importance of cis-lunar space – the region around the moon – which will serve as a proving ground for missions to Mars and beyond and advance our stepping stone approach to going farther into the solar system .” Pence also said according to the intelligence community, China and Russia are developing antisatellite technology, saying in his article, “We will renew America’s commitment to creating the space technology needed to protect national security.” The vice president did look ahead to the red planet in his WSJ article, saying, “America will be the first nation to bring mankind to Mars.” Via The Verge Images via NASA and Wikimedia Commons

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Solar SILO home uses light to feel much larger than its actual size

October 9, 2017 by  
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Daylight, fresh air, and greenery fill this self-sufficient solar home that feels much larger than its actual size. Students from the Missouri University of Science and Technology designed this net-zero dwelling, named SILO, short for ‘Smart Innovative Living Oasis.’ Inspired by farmhouse architecture, SILO blends a rustic aesthetic with cutting-edge technology to create a homey and completely automated dwelling that ensures stress-free comfort year-round. Home automation is at the heart of SILO. From the HVAC system to lighting, these engineered systems work in tandem to create a comfortable and energy-efficient living space. An energy monitoring system sends feedback to the central control system to improve efficiency and includes the ability to sell excess energy generated by the 8.5-kW rooftop solar array back to the grid. The homeowner can also control all of the home’s systems manually via smartphone or voice commands. Related: The Nest home is a solar-powered prefab made from recycled shipping containers SILO features a flexible open-floor plan that emphasizes views of the outdoors and access to natural light. The light-filled home feels much larger than its actual size thanks to a high-ceiling living area and glazing that wraps both ends of the home. A graywater system feeds into a beautiful water wall, while treated water is reused for irrigation of non-edible landscaping such as the movable green wall. A clay plaster made partly with recycled materials was used as wall paint and boasts air-purifying and humidity-regulating benefits. SILO was designed and built for the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2017 and will return to Missouri to be part of the university’s eco-village after the competition. + Solar Decathlon Images by Mike Chino

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Solar SILO home uses light to feel much larger than its actual size

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