These AI-powered cameras can sense poachers and save wildlife

January 14, 2019 by  
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Animal poaching is on the rise as people find interest in ivory,  fur , skins and more for their financial value. Previous technologies have tried to capture poachers in the act, but often failed because the poachers could ping cell towers and find (and avoid) the tracking technology. Now, Intel is debuting a smart system of cameras that relies on radio frequencies and artificial intelligence to catch the criminals and save the wildlife. We gave this technology a go at CES 2019, and here is how it works. Intel’s new TrailGuard uses “ AI for social good.” This technology is powering cameras with artificial intelligence to stop illegal poachers in their tracks. Each camera is hidden in natural areas where wild animal poaching is common. The cameras use motion sensors that, once triggered, turn the cameras on to start recording nearby activity. Related: Mass poaching in Botswana leaves behind 90 tuskless elephants Because the cameras use artificial intelligence, they can tell the difference between the movement of, say, an animal or wind and specific human activity, such as poacher’s body language or clothing. At CES 2019, these cameras were installed in a dark area designed to mimic nature. Even if you walk carefully, you are no match for these smart cameras. In the low light, it’s nearly impossible to find the cameras, and because they run on radio frequencies, poachers cannot pinpoint and avoid them. But the recordings capture a clear view of poachers, making it easier for authorities to end these activities and save more animals’ lives. Related: This AI food truck could bring fresh produce directly to you In addition to being showcased at CES 2019, the TrailGuard technology is also being deployed in the Congo. + Intel Photography by Inhabitat

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These AI-powered cameras can sense poachers and save wildlife

New library in Hanoi aims to show young children the benefits of aquaponics in an urban setting

January 14, 2019 by  
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While most libraries tend to be filled with nothing more than books, the new VAC library (an abbreviation of the Vietnamese words for Garden, Pond and Cage) in Hanoi is teeming with koi fish and greenery. Vietnamese firm Farming Architects has built the the new open-air library with an impressive aquaponic system to teach the kids about urban farming. Located in a Hanoi neighborhood, the VAC Library is an immense structure comprised of wooden frames with various cubicles filled with books. However, within the almost 600 square feet library is an integrated production system that was designed to teach kids about sustainable food production. Related: URBANANA is Vertical Banana Plantation That Would Bring Tropical Fruit Farming to Paris According to the architects, the library is designed to show children how energy from land, air, water and solar energy can be harvested in order to be completely self-sufficient even within an urban context, “The aim is not only to produce an effective use of natural resources but also favorite experimentation in using different types of plants and animals in the urban environment.” At the heart of its design, the VAC library relies on aquaponic systems to provide a sustainable model. The structure’s fish pond provide nutrients to the plants, which in return purify the water. Built with energy conservation in mind, the system runs on a few pumps powered by solar energy, which also provides the electricity for the lighting system as well. In addition to its impressive sustainable systems , the VAC library is a center of learning. Besides reading the many books on offer, local children enjoy learning about the way that the fish in the ponds are so vital to the vegetable planters and so on. There are also chickens on site whose eggs are used for meals and their waste used as fertilizer for the center’s gardens. + Farming Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Thai Thach and Viet Dung An via Farming Architects  

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New library in Hanoi aims to show young children the benefits of aquaponics in an urban setting

These are the most endangered species in the world

January 14, 2019 by  
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As 2018 ended, it brought to light the reality that some  animals — after existing on Earth for millions of years — are gone for good. At the end of last year, scientists announced that three bird species went extinct, and there are even more species that could vanish in 2019. Unlike past mass extinctions , which were the result of things like asteroid strikes and volcanic eruptions, the current crisis is mostly caused by human activities. The Earth is currently losing animal species at 1,000 to 10,000 times the natural rate, meaning we could see 30 to 50 percent of the planet’s species going extinct by 2050. Related: 10 species at risk of extinction under the Trump administration According to the Center for Biological Diversity , we are in the middle of the planet’s sixth mass extinction of plants and animals, and this latest wave of species die-offs is the worst we have experienced since the loss of dinosaurs 65 million years ago. “Our results confirm that there is a growing wave of extinctions sweeping across the continents, driven mainly by habitat loss and degradation from unsustainable agriculture and logging,” Birdlife chief scientist Stuart Butchart told USA Today . We have an abundance of animals that help the world’s ecosystems thrive, but what will happen when more animals become endangered and go extinct? Eco2 Greetings has created an interactive map that highlights the animals that have recently become endangered and critically endangered, and it also shows where their natural habitats are based. The world’s most critically endangered species include Vaquita (population 30), Javan Rhino (63), Sumatran Rhino (80), Amur Leopard (84), Cross River Gorilla (250), Malayan Tiger (295), Sumatran Tiger (400), Mountain Gorilla (880), Yangtze Finless Porpoise (950) and Sumatran Elephant (2,600). The world’s most endangered species are North Atlantic Right Whale (325), Indochinese Tiger (350), Black-footed Ferret (370), Amur Tiger (540), Borneo Pygmy Elephant (1,500), Ganges River Dolphin (1,500), Indus River Dolphin (1,816), Galapagos Penguin (2,000), Bengal Tiger (2,500) and Sri Lankan Elephant (3,250). The existence of these animals is in our hands. So now the question is what can we do to boost these numbers and save these species? + Eco2 Greetings Image via Bernie Catterall

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These are the most endangered species in the world

Report Report: Circular, leaders, weather and renewables

July 17, 2018 by  
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2018 Information and Communications Technology Benchmark (KnowTheChain) scores the top 40 companies across the Information and Communications Technology industry based on their actions to mitigate forced labor in the supply chain. The report gave the highest score to Intel, followed by HP Inc., Apple, and HPE.

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Report Report: Circular, leaders, weather and renewables

Reinventing Infrastructure With Digital Efficiency

October 2, 2017 by  
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Digital efficiency is a critical differentiator enabling competitiveness and growth in companies and countries. The industrial internet enables efficiency improvements that yield economic gains and environmental benefits beyond the traditional development and introduction of new technology. Leaders from GE, Intel and MWH will share insights and global examples of how embracing digital efficiency has returned costs savings, reduced emissions, and created greater productivity within their own operations and for their customers.

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Reinventing Infrastructure With Digital Efficiency

Can One Highway Drive the Future?

October 2, 2017 by  
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The visionary team behind The Ray tells the story behind their revolutionary stretch of IT-embedded roadway in Georgia, “the world’s first sustainable highway,” and the many innovations and possibilities created on the journey to transform our transportation infrastructure.

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Can One Highway Drive the Future?

Testing their metal: The new tech sector focus on conflict minerals

January 20, 2016 by  
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By the end of 2016, Intel’s complete product line will be validated as “conflict free.” Here’s what others can learn from its initiatives.

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Testing their metal: The new tech sector focus on conflict minerals

Intel to source 100% of its products from conflict-free suppliers

January 18, 2016 by  
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Intel just announced plans to source its entire supply chain from conflict-free sources from the year 2016 onward. The move is designed to support the miners of metal materials, instead of violent warlords in regions such as the Democratic Republic of Congo. Through continuous evaluation of where and how crucial metals for products are sourced – such as tungsten, tantalum, and tin – Intel is moving closer to being 100 percent conflict-free. Read the rest of Intel to source 100% of its products from conflict-free suppliers

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Intel to source 100% of its products from conflict-free suppliers

MICA: High-Tech, High Fashion “Smart” Bracelets Unveiled at New York Fashion Week

September 14, 2014 by  
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Wearable technology has yet to hit the mainstream, but that isn’t stopping the fashion industry from trying to add a stylish twist to the high-tech novelties. Earlier this month, Intel , in partnership with French fashion house Opening Ceremony, unveiled a luxurious smart bracelet made out of snakeskin and semi-precious jewels at New York Fashion Week . Dubbed MICA ( My Intelligent Communication Accessory ), this luxurious piece of wearable technology will be available at Barney’s starting this winter. READ MORE> Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: intel , mica , My Intelligent Communication Accessory , new york fashion week , opening ceremony , wearable technology

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MICA: High-Tech, High Fashion “Smart” Bracelets Unveiled at New York Fashion Week

17 Year-Old’s Science Project Speeds Discovery of New Flu-Fighting Drugs

March 14, 2014 by  
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When most of us were 17, we dreamed of owning our own car and the freedom that would come with college admission. But Eric Chen dreams of much more. This California high-school senior wants to change the world, and if his collection of first place prizes from some of the most prestigious science fairs in the nation is any indication, he’s already well on his way. Chen’s groundbreaking project uses computer modeling to zero in on chemical compounds that could be effective at fighting the dreaded flu. The project took top honors at the Google Science Fair, the Siemens Science Fair, and most recently, the  Intel Science Talent Search  competition, and has already led to the discovery of some promising flu-fighting drugs . Read the rest of 17 Year-Old’s Science Project Speeds Discovery of New Flu-Fighting Drugs Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Anti-Flu Drugs , Design for Health , Eric Chen , Eric Chen Google Science Fair , Eric Chen Intel Science Talent Search , flu , Flu Pandemic , influenza vaccines , teen prodigies        

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17 Year-Old’s Science Project Speeds Discovery of New Flu-Fighting Drugs

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