Wind-powered machine mimics the sound of 500 galloping horses

September 11, 2017 by  
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How do you bring an ancient landscape to life? Architecture studio NEON breathes life into England’s historical Chesters Roman Fort by recreating the sound of 500 galloping horses. Architect Mark Nixon led the design of Cavalary 360, a wind-powered installation that mimics the sounds of horse hooves clopping on the ground while framing the North Tyne landscape. The site-specific musical instrument pays homage to the 500 horses that belonged to the Roman cavalrymen that roamed the land 1,600 years ago. Calvary 360 was created as part of Hadrian’s Calvary, an exhibition that celebrates the Roman cavalry with unique installations installed along Hadrian’s Wall . “It can be difficult to make a connection between the preserved walls of the Roman cavalry fort (the most extensive in Britain) and the powerful mounted troops based here,” wrote NEON. “Cavalry 360° is a vast site specific musical instrument which uses the force of the wind to create the sound of the cavalry moving across the landscape beyond. The piece creates an equine soundscape as a means of evoking the imagination of the viewer to fill in the gaps.” Related: Mobile residence for writers to meander the border of England’s former Roman Empire The massive musical instrument is a circular structure made up of 32 wind turbines elevated on tall black frames. Each wind turbine is connected to 15 beaters, each of which represents a single horse in the cavalry. The frame units are visually paired to represent the 30 horses in a turma, the term for a cavalry unit in the Roman Roman army. The cups at the end of the three turbine arms catch the wind, which powers and rotates the insulation that changes sound depending on the direction and speed of the wind. Visitors are encouraged to stand in the middle of Cavalary 360 to experience the full effect and look out to views of the fort and landscape through the black frames. + NEON Via Dezeen Images by Lightly Frozen

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Wind-powered machine mimics the sound of 500 galloping horses

Alex Chinnecks mesmerizing crack on a brick building turns heads in London

August 1, 2017 by  
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From a melting house to a floating building, British artist Alex Chinneck has a knack for turning heads—and his latest work is no exception. For his first permanent artwork, Chinneck created an enormous crack down the side of the building in an optical illusion called “Six pins and half a dozen needles.” Created with a group of engineers, steelworkers, and brick-makers, this monumental artwork at Assembly London is officially unveiled to the public today, August 1. Commissioned by AXA Investment Managers – Real Assets , the surrealist Six pins and half a dozen needles artwork is located at Assembly London , a major mixed-use campus on a site that previously housed publishing facilities. Chinneck references the publishing industry in his design, which resembles a torn sheet of paper. “The work was conceived to engage people in a fun and uplifting way,” said Chinneck. “Although we use real brick , it was designed with a cartoon-like quality to give the sculpture an endearing artifice and playful personality. I set out to create accessible artworks and I sincerely hope this becomes a popular landmark for London and positive experience for Londoners. Following 14-months of development, this represents my studio’s first permanent project and we are excited to be working on more. Forthcoming artworks include a trail of four sculptures with a combined height of 163-metres that will be constructed from over 100,000 bricks.” Related: Alex Chinneck Builds a Wax House in London Just to Watch it Melt Six pins and half a dozen needles is constructed from 4,000 bricks and over 1,000 stainless steel components. A crane was used to carefully position the artwork in place at 20 meters above ground level. The installation leans against a concrete facade and weighs approximately ten-tonnes. + Alex Chinneck Images by Charles Emerson

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Alex Chinnecks mesmerizing crack on a brick building turns heads in London

Studio Gang designs massive paper tube Hive for the National Building Museum

April 19, 2017 by  
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The National Building Museum has welcomed giant ball pits , mazes , and icebergs into its historic Great Hall, and this year the Washington, D.C. museum will welcome yet another imaginative creation: the Hive. Architecture firm Studio Gang designed the latest installation for the Museum’s Summer Block Party series that commissions larger-than-life temporary structures. The massive Hive will be built from thousands of recyclable paper tubes stacked to reach 60 feet in height. Built with over 2,700 wound paper tubes , the Hive will soar to the uppermost reaches of the museum and take on a curved form reminiscent of Saarinen’s Gateway Arch in St. Louis and even a spider’s web. The tubes, which vary in size, are interlocked to create three interconnected domed chambers, the largest of which has an oculus over 10 feet in diameter. The tubes will have a reflective silver exterior and a bright magenta interior. “When you enter the Great Hall you almost feel like you’re in an outside space because of the distance sound travels before it is reflected back and made audible,” said Studio Gang founding principal Jeanne Gang. “We’ve designed a series of chambers shaped by sound that are ideally suited for intimate conversations and gatherings as well as performances and acoustic experimentation. Using wound paper tubes, a common building material with unique sonic properties, and interlocking them to form a catenary dome, we create a hive for these activities, bringing people together to explore and engage the senses.” Related: ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C. The Hive will open to the public July 4 until September 4, 2017. A full schedule of concerts, tours, talks, and programs will be hosted alongside the installation . + Studio Gang Images via National Building Museum

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Studio Gang designs massive paper tube Hive for the National Building Museum

Air-purifying pavilion uses plants to absorb harmful toxins in Hanoi

April 19, 2017 by  
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A green oasis has popped up in Hanoi , a city choked by smog. Hung Nguyen Architects designed and built the Pavilion of Origins, a greenery-draped structure that uses living plants to purify the air. Set on the terrace of a three-story house in Hanoi, the pavilion is minimal and modern with a simple palette of green leafy plants, white upcycled steed frames, and a light gray pebble floor. Hanoi ranks among the worst in the world for air pollution with traffic congestion blamed as the leading cause. In an attempt to bring a breath of fresh air to the city, Hung Nguyen Architects created a pavilion covered with a wide variety of plants, including the peace lily and snake plant, selected for their air-purifying and decorative qualities. The plants are arranged inside and around a collection of simple white cuboid frames of varying sizes built of upcycled steel. A translucent polycarbonate roof allows natural light to pour through while reducing solar radiation. The white frames and light-colored pebble floor keep the focus on the plants, which grow and spread on multiple levels. White netting on the tops of the larger cuboid frames can be used as hammocks for relaxation. Related: 7 indoor plants that purify the air around you naturally “In Pavilion of the Origins, trees and plants play a role as the main users for the amount of time they spent in this space, while the pavilion owners act as the servants who have the duties to take care of those main users and subsequently be paid in clean, fresh air, as well as experiencing the vivid beauty of the natural origins,” wrote the architects. “This slender structure is just a minimal intervention of human to nature. Architecture, in this sense, acts as a rope to tighten up the interaction and connection between humans and nature.” + Hung Nguyen Architects Via ArchDaily Images via Hung Nguyen Architects

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Air-purifying pavilion uses plants to absorb harmful toxins in Hanoi

Award-winning grass-covered pavilion in India constructed with over 1,000 recycled pallets

February 14, 2017 by  
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Over a thousand discarded shipping pallets went into the making of this partly planted, undulating pavilion in New Delhi. Local architecture firm M:OFA Studios drew inspiration from India’s ruins and their love of upcycling to create Pensieve, an award-winning experimental pavilion with a name inspired by the “memory basin” in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series. The temporary installation served as an urban playground and public gathering space that inspired people to contemplate their surroundings. Built as part of India Design ID 2014, the Pensieve is no longer standing though it continues to be recognized in awards, such as its nomination in the Kohler Bold Design Awards 2016. Over 1,200 recycled pallets were stacked together in an asymmetrical shape inspired by the hundreds of stone ruins that dot the capital, where many locals used as playgrounds in their childhood. Compost added inside some of the open pallets was used as a growing medium for grass and other plants. Related: Charming Wine Shop Built with Repurposed Shipping Pallets Pops Up in Poland “The concept initiated from the basic idea of ‘fluid’ thoughts,” write the architects. “Built out of recycled wood , this pavilion was asked on the idea of unobstructed thoughts associated often with the children. The pavilion became a reminder of those simpler times, where the kids looked at the world beyond a 4 inch by 3 inch display screen in their hands.” The large 800-square-foot installation framed a public gathering space that also included solar-powered furniture that lit up when people sat on them and a hundred fiber-optic sculptures that used motion sensors to light up at night. + M:OFA Studios Images via M:OFA Studios

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Award-winning grass-covered pavilion in India constructed with over 1,000 recycled pallets

A river made of 10,000 glowing books flows through Toronto

October 26, 2016 by  
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This large, interactive  art installation is created by group of anonymous artists/activists who “want literature to take over the streets and conquer public spaces, freely offering those passersby a traffic-free place which, for some hours, will succumb to the humble power of the written word.” Related: Alicia Martin’s Amazing Book Sculptures Pour out of Windows and Into the Streets The team has previously carried out the installation illegally in New York and Madrid, received official permission to appear in Melbourne, and has recently visited Toronto during Nuit Blanche Toronto, an annual, city-wide celebration of contemporary art. For this occasion, the group has used 10,000 books donated by the Salvation Army and worked for 12 days alongside 50 volunteers to replace cars with books on Hagerman Street, downtown Toronto . Related: Guy Laramée Carves a Majestic Lifelike Mountain Range Out of an Encyclopedia Britannica Set The artwork was open to the public for one night, during which visitors could immerse themselves in a literal flow of words and paper illuminated by soft lighting coming from the pages. They would sit down to read, take photos and eventually take pieces of the installation home. It took 10 hours for the installation to self-dismantle. + Luzinterruptus + Nuit Blanche Toronto

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A river made of 10,000 glowing books flows through Toronto

Hundreds of colorful swings transform a busy street in Luxembourg

July 21, 2016 by  
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nyr6pIDtr5w The swings are suspended just out of reach of pedestrians, evoking a sense of nostalgia for lazy summer days and childhood memories. With the ropes painted in bright colors, the installation is impossible to miss. In an article published at Dezeen , Mertens explained his intent: “Re-appropriated, multiplied and transposed in an unexpected context – suspended over a downtown pedestrian street – the swing becomes a playful work of art.” This isn’t the first time Mertens has created a magical and slightly surreal outdoor art installation. In the past, he’s created an “urban game” that passersby could play using a giant red balloon controlled by motion detectors, and sculptures involving balloons, chandeliers, and lightbulbs sprouting from the floor like flowers. The installation was created as part of a competition organized by the City of Luxembourg and several local groups. It was selected out of five other finalists for display, taking a month and a half to put together the swings and three days for a team of workers to install. If you’d like to catch it while it’s still on display, don’t wait — it’s only going to be up through August 2016. + Max Mertens

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Hundreds of colorful swings transform a busy street in Luxembourg

Momentum brings a psychedelic show of light and color to Vivid Sydney

June 6, 2016 by  
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A dynamic show of light and color has touched down in the land Down Under. As part of Vivid Sydney , the city’s annual light, music, and ideas festival, Australian artists Stephanie Shehata and Erin Slaviero created Momentum , a collection of three vertical freestanding portals that explore the relationship between light, material, form and speed. Viewers can interact with each portal by spinning a wheel that transforms the installation into a moving kaleidoscope of color and reflection. The installation is on view from 6PM onwards every day in Walsh Bay until the end of Vivid Sydney on Saturday, June 18. https://vimeo.com/168824671 + Momentum The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Momentum brings a psychedelic show of light and color to Vivid Sydney

Interactive recycled bottle installation demonstrates delicate balance between light and water

March 23, 2016 by  
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At the “Paesaggi Mirati” art and architecture exhibition, an installation named “Tightrope walker”, interpreted the festival’s social utopia theme as the utopia of balance. Designed and built by Laura Crespi and Corinne Gallotti (a duo of young architects from studio 48nodi ), the installation takes the form of a cabin, whose external walls are made out of 480 transparent plastic bottles and glisten in the sun. Beyond the curtain that serves as an entrance five small suns break the darkness: clear plastic bottles filled with water and attached to the ceiling to amplify the sun’s rays inside the cabin. Under each bottle, suspended by a nylon thread, is a small glass jar holding a germinating plant. Read the rest of Interactive recycled bottle installation demonstrates delicate balance between light and water

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Interactive recycled bottle installation demonstrates delicate balance between light and water

Otherworldly Yaroof installation by Aljoud Lootah celebrates Dubai’s fishing heritage

November 2, 2015 by  
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Traditional Yaroof shore fishermen use beach seine netting made of strong mesh, mainly to catch small fish. Fishermen wade into the sea from the shore, holding the edge of the net. Inspired by this process, Aljoud Lootah designed his installation using four octagon frames, each with patterns of nylon ropes that reference the structure of a fishing net . Arabesque motifs were also used as inspiration for the patterns, which create curves using straight lines. Related: Aljoud Lootah’s Oru origami furniture is made from teak, felt and copper The installation was placed on the beach as a kind of shelter, providing shade for beach goers and promoting this year’s Dubai Design Week, which aims to diversify and develop the design industry in the city. + Aljoud Lootah + Dubai Design Week Via Cool Hunting Photos via Aljoud Lootah

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