This calculator tracks the carbon emissions of your travels

December 11, 2018 by  
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The global community has become increasingly smaller in recent decades thanks to affordable travel . But just because distance is no longer a major barrier, it doesn’t mean there isn’t a negative side of traveling — the environmental impact. Now, thanks to Mission Emission by Oblik Studio, there is a new “ emission-free travel calculator ” that can calculate the emissions a vehicle will produce when commuting to specific destinations, and it also suggests sustainable, alternative ways to reach your destination. In addition to providing information on the emissions of a specific trip, the calculator will also tell you the carbon footprint of your trip and the damage your trip can cause to you and the environment. Users can find out the amount of time a tree will need to absorb the CO2 emissions from a specified trip. Related: How to use a carbon footprint calculator to maximize energy savings For example, when using the calculator, you will discover that the 120-mile drive from Los Angeles to San Diego in a small car that uses gasoline has a fuel consumption of 23.1 miles per gallon and CO2 emissions of 13.9 ounces per mile. Plus, it takes a tree 2.17 years to absorb the amount of CO2 emitted during the trip. The website comes from the Mission Emission project, which has a goal to raise awareness of the global pollution problem and the environmental impact of travel while helping users learn how to reduce their environmental waste. Recently, concentrations of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide have reached their highest level in 800,000 years. CO2 emissions rose a startling 60 percent between 1990 and 2014 before leveling off for three years. However, in 2017, they started to rise again. Since the signing of the Paris Agreement in 2015, heads of state and other world leaders have committed to fight climate change through policy. However, individuals still need to do their part in the fight, and the Mission Emission Project is hoping that the travel calculator will help people do just that. + Mission Emission Images via Mission Emission

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This calculator tracks the carbon emissions of your travels

Episode 151: Hunter Lovins looks ahead, a startup accelerator guide

December 7, 2018 by  
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A group of industry leaders in the building products space including Interface, Gensler and Skanska is working on a database of low-carbon products.

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Episode 151: Hunter Lovins looks ahead, a startup accelerator guide

Get the ball rolling: Dow’s blueprint for unlocking carbon reductions

December 7, 2018 by  
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A Q&A with the global technology and sustainability head on the new Dow and Olympic climate collaboration.

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Get the ball rolling: Dow’s blueprint for unlocking carbon reductions

How Kickstarter is encouraging designers to consider circularity and other environmental factors

November 30, 2018 by  
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The crowdfunding platform is aiming to foster the development of products with positive impact.

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How Kickstarter is encouraging designers to consider circularity and other environmental factors

5 transportation tech trends to watch

November 30, 2018 by  
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Cities that predict potholes, robo-taxis in Vegas, shared micro-mobility options and an EV charging buildout? What we heard backstage at VERGE 18.

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5 transportation tech trends to watch

Vessel Works is changing the to-go beverage game with its reusable mug

November 28, 2018 by  
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A new company called Vessel Works is attempting to change the game in the beverage industry. The idea is to get rid of the waste from single-use cups for hot and cold beverages by providing a reusable to-go cup in participating cafes. Here’s how it works. The Vessel Works to-go cup is an insulated stainless-steel mug that will keep your beverage hot or cold. When you visit a participating location, you can check out one of the free, reusable mugs via an app and then later drop it off at a kiosk. It is very similar to a bike-share program, and Vessel Works is hoping that it will be a popular alternative to the billions of paper cups that end up in landfills every year. It is also a solution that the company believes consumers will adopt more quickly than asking them to bring their own mugs from home. “Getting behavior change to happen is not an easy thing,” says Dagny Tucker, founder of Vessel . “If we look at a community that’s considered very sustainably-minded, i.e., Boulder, Colorado, you’ll find that in a survey of local cafes, less than 10 people are bringing their own cup every day.” According to Fast Company , Vessel Works chose Boulder, Colorado, to beta launch the idea with four cafes and they will later scale and add more. Consumers use an app to participate in the free program, but if they don’t return the mug within five days, there is a charge. After running the pilot for several months at a few cafes in Brooklyn and Manhattan, Tucker discovered that consumers liked the idea and it also led to people evaluating their choices for other single-use items. As consumers use the mug, they will get reports on how much they are reducing their carbon footprint and how much waste they are preventing. Tucker ran a pilot program for this idea in New York City back in 2016 while teaching at Parsons School of Design. She noticed that the paper cup was the most highly visible sign of disposability, with every fifth person walking down the street carrying a paper cup for a few minutes and then throwing it away. There are no upfront costs for a consumer to use the program, and the cost to participating cafes for each mug is less, on average, than what they pay for paper cups. The mugs are also easy to stack and store, and Vessel cleans all of the mugs at their commercial facility and then tracks them back to each cafe to maintain inventory. Tucker says that essentially, her company is trying to “disrupt the status quo of an entire industry.” Via Fast Company and Vessel Works Image via Vessel Works

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Vessel Works is changing the to-go beverage game with its reusable mug

Norwegian expedition cruise line Hurtigruten aiming to convert six of its 17 ships to use biogas

November 28, 2018 by  
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The Norwegian expedition cruise line Hurtigruten is going to do their part to help the environment. The 125-year-old company is aiming to convert six of its 17 ships to use biogas , liquified natural gas, and large battery packs by 2021. The biogas will be generated with waste fish parts – leftovers of fish processed for food – and mixed with other organic waste to use green energy to power their polluting cruise liners. Biogas is the result of speeding up the natural decomposition process and capturing the methane produced. Liquified natural gas is a fossil fuel, but it is cleaner than many alternatives. Battery power is also a promising technology for ocean transport. It has been difficult building batteries that are powerful enough to last an entire voyage, but advances in battery manufacturing are starting to make it possible. Related: Invasive soft rush weed turned into sustainable packaging materials “Norway is a large shipping nation, but fishery and forestry are also large sectors. They create jobs and produce income, but they also produce a lot of waste products. The steady access to high volumes of organic waste gives the Nordic countries a unique position on the biogas market. We are pushing for more innovation, more investment. I believe we have just seen the beginning of what in a few years will be a huge sector,” says Daniel Skjeldam, the chief executive of Hurtigruten. Ocean transport vessels currently use heavy fossil fuels , and it is an ever-increasing problem because they pollute more than fuels used by land vehicles and they emit sulfur and other contaminants. The daily greenhouse gas emissions from the largest cruise liners in the world are more than the emissions of a million cars. The cruise ship fuels are contributing to air pollution and climate change . But, this change to biogas will cut down the number of pollutants, plus it will reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Related: The Netherlands will spend 150 million Euros to turn cow poop into biogas Hurtigruten is also banning single-use plastics as part of their plan to be more environmentally sustainable. The company is also currently building three new hybrid-powered ships that will be delivered over the next three years. According to The Guardian, the company operates its cruises in the Arctic and Antarctic , which are both highly sensitive environments. Via The Guardian Images via michaelmep

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Norwegian expedition cruise line Hurtigruten aiming to convert six of its 17 ships to use biogas

3 ways entrepreneurs can influence the adoption of environmental standards

November 27, 2018 by  
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New research shows that as green entrepreneurship grows, traditional industries are adapting and collaborating.

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3 ways entrepreneurs can influence the adoption of environmental standards

Partnering to protect water

November 27, 2018 by  
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One company’s efforts to assess its water risk across its global manufacturing facilities.

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Partnering to protect water

Air taxis — why they’re no longer pie in the sky

November 27, 2018 by  
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Major transportation players such as Uber are already investing in the up-and-coming sector.

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Air taxis — why they’re no longer pie in the sky

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