Timberland invests in regenerative leather ranches

June 19, 2020 by  
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Timberland invests in regenerative leather ranches Deonna Anderson Fri, 06/19/2020 – 02:45 Regenerative agriculture practices have received a lot of attention in recent years, and much of the focus has been on food production. But more companies outside of the food space are figuring out how they can invest in or use regenerative practices in the supply chain for their products.  One of those companies is Timberland, which in late May announced a new partnership with the Savory Institute, a nonprofit focused on the large-scale regeneration of the world’s grasslands. The move comes on the heels of Timberland’s announcing a collaboration with Other Half Processing , which sources hides from Thousand Hills Lifetime Grazed regenerative ranches, to build a more responsible leather supply chain. The new partnership with the Savory Institute is two-pronged. One of those prongs is Timberland’s move to co-fund the Savory Institute’s ecological outcome verification (EOV) programs on all ranches within the Thousand Hills Lifetime Grazed network, made up of early adopter regenerative ranches across the United States. The investment is part of a larger sustainability strategy at Timberland that is focused on three pillars — better products, stronger communities and a greener world.  This offers an opportunity to actually source in a way that can help restore the environments that we sourced from, and actually have a net positive effect of giving back more than we take. “What’s so exciting about the regenerative agriculture opportunity is basically that it’s a way that we can hit on all three of those pillars with one project,” said Zack Angelini, environmental stewardship manager at Timberland, the outdoor apparel and footwear manufacturing company, which uses leather for much of its outdoor wear. “This offers an opportunity to actually source in a way that can help restore the environments that we sourced from, and actually have a net positive effect of giving back more than we take.” The funding, which Timberland shares with Thousand Hills, will help the EOV program collect data about the ranches with helping them continually improve their regenerative practices and outcomes. The program collects information about soil health, biodiversity and ecosystem function, which is related to water cycle, mineral cycle, energy flow and community dynamics. Additionally, the funds will support network ranchers with resource development and getting more trainers trained, as well as covering typical administrative and marketing costs to help explain the message of what regenerative is and why it matters. The second prong of the partnership is the opportunity for Timberland to test and learn and build a new supply chain from the ground up. This fall, Timberland plans to introduce a collection of boots using regenerative leather sourced from Thousand Hills Lifetime Grazed ranches. Angelini said this effort will serve as a proof of concept that can show what can be done.  “But definitely our long-term vision is to really get to the wide-scale adoption of these materials, both in our own supply chain, but also getting it to be industry-wide,” he said. Scaling up and reaching critical mass Chris Kerston, chief commercial officer for the land-to-market program at the Savory Institute, said that around the time the institute was reaching critical mass in its food work — where consumers are able to access options that were produced regeneratively at similar price points and with similar quality as conventional options — it decided to start working with apparel companies. For the apparel industry, critical mass would look like mass adoption of using natural materials and natural fibers. “So much of what we wear, if we think about it, is really just repurposed oil,” Kerston said. “And I think that the next generation, the millennials and [Gen Z] are saying, ‘Is that really what we want?’” “We think we have a big opportunity in front of us to … bring this to the mainstream and help drive towards that tipping point,” Angelini added, noting that this work has been in the pipeline for Timberland for over a decade. So much of what we wear, if we think about it, is really just repurposed oil. “It actually dates back all the way to 2005 [when] Timberland co-founded a group called the Leather Working Group (LWG), which basically was formed to address the impacts of the tanning stage of leather production,” Angelini said. Through the working group, Timberland was able to revolutionize the sustainability of the tanning of its leather by going down to that stage in the supply chain. LWG also helped to bring other players in the industry along. Now a not-for-profit membership organization that has developed audit protocols to certify leather manufacturers on their environmental compliance and performance capabilities, LWG counts other apparel brands such as Adidas, Eileen Fisher and VF, Timberland’s parent company, as members.  Now, Timberland hopes to move the industry forward even further. “We’re kind of excited about this next opportunity to basically help change the industry again, but this time, I’m going a step even further down the supply chain to the farms [where] the leather actually comes from,” Angelini said. Pull Quote This offers an opportunity to actually source in a way that can help restore the environments that we sourced from, and actually have a net positive effect of giving back more than we take. So much of what we wear, if we think about it, is really just repurposed oil. Topics Supply Chain Regenerative Agriculture Fashion Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) On Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Cattle on a Thousand Hills Lifetime Grazed ranch, Courtesy of Thousand Hills Lifetime Grazed Thousand Hills Lifetime Grazed Close Authorship

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Timberland invests in regenerative leather ranches

Horseshoe crab blood remains industry standard for big pharma

June 2, 2020 by  
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It’s a bad week for horseshoe crabs as their defenders have failed to convince big pharma that synthetic crab blood is a viable alternative for endotoxin testing in drugs. Maryland-based US Pharmacopeia (USP) has blocked this effort. Real horseshoe crabs’ copper-rich blue blood clots when it comes into contact with bacterial endotoxins — which, if present in products, can cause severe diarrhea and even toxic hemorrhagic shock. Since partially replacing rabbit tests in 1977, horseshoe crabs’ blood has been the industry standard. Animal rights groups and Switzerland-based Lonza have pushed for synthetic versions called recombinant Factor C (rFC). Related: Pacific Ocean’s elevated acidity is dissolving Dungeness crabs’ shells At first, experts thought USP, which produces influential drug industry publications, would add rFC to its chapter on international endotoxin testing standards. Instead, the organization decided to give rFC its own chapter. This means that even if a company wants to use rFC, it will still have to do additional testing with real horseshoe crab blood to validate results, which ultimately defeats the purpose. “Given the importance of endotoxin testing in protecting patients … the committee ultimately decided more real-world data [was needed],” USP said in a statement. USP said it supports shifting to rFC where possible, potentially including testing COVID-19 vaccines or medicines. Some drug companies are already using the synthetic tests to improve human health . Eli Lilly uses rFC for testing Emgality, a migraine treatment. Unlike most lab animals, the horseshoe crabs are captured, bled and released. John Dubczak, director of operations at Charles River Laboratories, told Scientific American that no more than 30% of a crab’s blood is removed and claimed a mortality rate of 4%. “One of my suppliers built a water slide to put the crabs back into the water,” Dubczak told Scientific American . “They love it!” Conservationists suspect the mortality rate is much higher for the industry as a whole. “There’s not very good science-based information on the mortality of the crabs,” Michael De Luca, senior associate director at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University, said in the same article. “I’ve see figures range from 15% to 40% but nobody has a really good handle on that.” Via The Guardian , Scientific American and Horseshoe Crab Image via Chris Engel

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Horseshoe crab blood remains industry standard for big pharma

The fashion industry is unsustainable — here’s how journalism is inspiring activism to improve it

May 15, 2020 by  
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The fashion industry is unsustainable — here’s how journalism is inspiring activism to improve it Kirstie Dabbs Fri, 05/15/2020 – 01:43 The fast fashion industry has long been critiqued for unsustainable practices and unethical working conditions. From global cotton supply chains to pollution from textile factories, the need to improve the industry in favor of both people and the planet is pressing.  Bard MBA student Kirstie Dabbs spoke recently with author Elizabeth Segran about their shared passion for building a sustainability-centered future for the fashion industry. They discussed the unchecked growth of the fashion industry’s business model, possibilities for regulations, and how to inspire systematic change in global fast fashion.  Segran writes about design, with a particular focus on the fashion industry as a senior staff writer at Fast Company Magazine . She also recently authored a new book, ” The Rocket Years: How Your Twenties Launch the Rest of Your Life .” In it, she discusses how all kinds of decisions that we make in our 20s — from career to love to family — have the greatest impact on how our lives play out. There are 8 billion humans on this planet, but a lot of the data suggests that we’re making about 100 billion articles of clothing for them. Kirstie Dabbs: What inspired you to begin writing about the fashion industry and climate change? Elizabeth Segran: In a lot of ways, the work I did for “The Rocket Years” is extremely relevant to the conversation about the fashion industry and climate change. The decisions young people make, the activism they pursue and the ways they think about building a career can all center around trying to solve some of these problems and having a real impact.   Collectively, young people need to be involved in being part of the solution here. I have a lot of hope that we can change this industry, which is causing so much disruption to the planet. Dabbs: As you dug into the fashion industry’s environmental footprint, what were some discoveries that jumped out at you? Segran: I was really surprised about exactly how much we’re overconsuming in the world of fashion. There are 8 billion humans on this planet, but a lot of the data suggests that we’re making about 100 billion articles of clothing for them. Plus, if you think about how those clothes are spread out around the world, people in many places don’t own that many clothes. So the vast majority of the clothes being manufactured are going to countries like the United States. Then, when you think about how many resources go into making every single garment, including the $5 shirt from H&M, it adds up. There’s an enormous cost in natural resources like cotton and wool, and there’s a massive impact on the climate because a lot of carbon is involved in manufacturing nylon and polyester.  There’s just so much waste in this industry. Clothes are made at such low cost that we go into a store or we go online, and we fill our carts with clothes that look fashionable right now but that we essentially treat as disposable. In a few months, maybe a few years, all of those clothes will end up in the trash. Dabbs: Can you speak to the discrepancy between the population growth rate and that of the fashion industry? Segran: The first part of the problem is that fast fashion has created a new way of interacting with clothes that make them pretty much disposable. The second part of the problem is that companies are measured by how quickly they can grow — investors want to see constant growth. This means that, for a fashion brand to continue growing, it either needs to sell clothes to more customers or needs to sell that same customer more clothes.  The fashion industry is growing at a rate of about 3 to 4 percent a year , but the human population is only growing at a rate of about 1 percent . We can see why we’ve gotten to the point of such massive overconsumption. Dabbs: How do you hope to inspire systemic change through your work? Segran: Sustainability reporters like myself have been talking about the environmental impact of the fashion industry, and over many years there’ve also been reporters consistently writing about human rights abuses in the fashion industry. It’s so clear now that those two things are connected. A lot of environmental destruction happens when we’re using inexpensive materials, and on the other side of that, we’re also using inexpensive labor to keep costs low.  I’ve written a lot about how farmers, particularly in India and Bangladesh, who are responsible for so much of global cotton production, are exposing themselves to toxic chemicals. A lot of the time, those chemicals end up in the ground water and poison entire villages. That’s one of the human costs we see along the chain in order to get these inexpensive materials.   Even if you ask a brand to regulate its environmental impact throughout its supply chain, that brand may just not have access to information about what’s happening lower down in the supply chain. There’s also the factory part to consider. We know that conditions in factories in many parts of the world are terrible, but because people are so desperate in those countries for work, they’re willing to work under awful conditions for very low wages. All of that for a $5 shirt we aren’t going to wear many times.   I’m asking consumers who read my stories to think about how they participate in this system. A lot of people struggle to understand exactly how the supply chain works, so I’m educating them about where abuses are happening and how they can call out companies for their bad practices.  It’s also my job to find out about companies that are doing things slightly better so that consumers can use what I call wallet activism to have an impact on the market. Investors and companies see what the trends are in terms of consumer spending and may adjust their behavior to respond. Dabbs: Is there a case for regulating the global fashion industry? Segran: This is a really important topic and one that I don’t think has been wrestled with enough. Part of the reason that the fashion industry is still largely unregulated is that the supply chain is really spread out. There are brands that don’t even know what the conditions are in factories because they work with middlemen who help them source products. Even if you ask a brand to regulate its environmental impact throughout its supply chain, that brand may just not have access to information about what’s happening lower down in the supply chain. So this is actually a very complex issue. Plus, even today we don’t have very good ways to measure environmental impact. We know that the industry is creating a lot of waste, but we’re not exactly sure how much. On the other hand, we’re beginning to use more circular models, where you might buy an article of clothing and after wearing it for a couple of years, send it back to be recycled and turned into new garments. Developing interesting models through innovation is a great way to move the industry forward. This Q&A is an edited excerpt from the Bard MBA’s May 1 The Impact Report podcast. The Impact Report brings together students and faculty in Bard’s MBA in Sustainability program with leaders in business, sustainability and social entrepreneurship. Pull Quote There are 8 billion humans on this planet, but a lot of the data suggests that we’re making about 100 billion articles of clothing for them. Even if you ask a brand to regulate its environmental impact throughout its supply chain, that brand may just not have access to information about what’s happening lower down in the supply chain. Contributors Katie Ellman Topics Retail Supply Chain Circular Economy Fashion Supply Chain Waste Collective Insight The Sustainable MBA Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Shutterstock Milos Vucicevic Close Authorship

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How the next coronavirus stimulus could be a win-win for cruise lines and the environment

April 7, 2020 by  
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As the federal government seeks to bail out the industry, environmental advocacy organizations urged Congress to ensure that any financial aid for cruise lines come with strings attached.

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How the next coronavirus stimulus could be a win-win for cruise lines and the environment

Green hydrogen could curb one-third of fossil fuel and industry emissions by 2050

April 7, 2020 by  
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That’s according to a BloombergNEF report that calls policy support for the hydrogen economy “insufficient.”

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Green hydrogen could curb one-third of fossil fuel and industry emissions by 2050

UN aviation body ditches older carbon credits from offsetting scheme

March 19, 2020 by  
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Some green groups welcome International Civil Aviation Organization’s decision to exclude ‘questionable’ carbon credits from the industry’s Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation.

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UN aviation body ditches older carbon credits from offsetting scheme

How GPS mapping and satellite technology help reduce deforestation

March 19, 2020 by  
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Sponsored: Technology can play a critical role in identifying risk and accelerating progress to reduce cocoa-related deforestation in Africa.

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How GPS mapping and satellite technology help reduce deforestation

Climate action infiltrates CES clamor, but electronics industry must do more

January 9, 2020 by  
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Lots of big tech companies talk about emissions reductions programs, but the truth is the industry as a whole still isn’t doing that much.

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Climate action infiltrates CES clamor, but electronics industry must do more

Climate action infiltrates CES clamor, but electronics industry must do more

January 9, 2020 by  
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Lots of big tech companies talk about emissions reductions programs, but the truth is the industry as a whole still isn’t doing that much.

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Climate action infiltrates CES clamor, but electronics industry must do more

It’s official: The first sustainability standard for professional services

October 21, 2019 by  
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The new framework includes metrics specific to the industry, such as key performance indicators for supplier diversity.

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It’s official: The first sustainability standard for professional services

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