Unilever To Add Carbon Footprint Information on Packaging

July 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco

Comments Off on Unilever To Add Carbon Footprint Information on Packaging

Unilever, the industrial giant behind the Seventh Generation, Dove, Ben … The post Unilever To Add Carbon Footprint Information on Packaging appeared first on Earth 911.

Read the rest here:
Unilever To Add Carbon Footprint Information on Packaging

Using waste carbon feedstocks to produce chemicals

May 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Using waste carbon feedstocks to produce chemicals

Using waste carbon feedstocks to produce chemicals Elizabeth R. Nesbitt Wed, 05/27/2020 – 14:36 Emerging carbon capture utilization (CCU) technologies potentially allow chemical companies and other manufacturers such as steel companies to convert waste carbon from industrial emissions — in the form of carbon monoxide (CO) and/or carbon dioxide (CO2) — into sustainable, value-added biofuels and chemicals. Using CCU technologies to consume waste feedstocks reportedly can cut production costs; monetize industrial emissions; allow companies to meet CO2 emissions goals; and foster continued development of a circular economy. Moreover, using waste carbon to make chemicals also can reduce manufacturers’ reliance on fossil fuels such as crude petroleum and natural gas, an important factor, particularly for the European Union and China, given the volatility in sourcing and pricing of fossil fuels. Factors driving adoption Technology providers such as LanzaTech (United States) and Avantium (Netherlands), among others, have developed novel CCU processes. The new processes, which reflect scientific advancements in industrial biotechnology and electrolysis, range from fermentation (using proprietary microorganisms) to electrocatalysis and are at varying stages of development (research scale to full commercialization). The extent to which new CCU technologies become commercially successful is based on multiple factors, including proximity of the consuming entity to the source of the waste carbon, and production and energy costs (including the availability and costs of renewable energy; companies predict that increased supplies of low-cost renewable energy will be needed). Government policies also play an important role in the evolving expansion of CCU projects. The extent to which new CCU technologies become commercially successful is based on multiple factors, including proximity of the consuming entity to the source of the waste carbon… Stakeholders and business models Large multinational chemical companies and steel companies are participating in CCU projects (a list showing examples of such projects is provided in the working paper ). Industry sources note that the new production capacity is generally in the form of modular “bolt-on” units that can be added to existing production facilities — such as steel plants, chemical plants, and refineries — that are major sources of CO/CO2 emissions. LanzaTech, one of the first companies to start commercial production of bioethanol using waste emissions, notes that steel mills worldwide produce about 30 billion gallons of waste gas per year and says its process can be used on about 65 percent of global steel mills, potentially producing 30 billion gallons of ethanol annually. The business models used along the value chain vary. Industry sources note that whereas the technology providers likely will license their technologies, the industrial emitters (such as steel companies) likely will use licensing and establish joint ventures (JVs) with the consuming/marketing entities. Many CCU projects underway to date are in China and Europe. Industry sources cite several reasons for this geographical concentration, including the magnitude of available waste emissions; industrial efforts to reduce emissions to meet national targets; funding; and government policies. One source, speaking of the European chemical industry, notes that CCU would allow the industry to both reduce its reliance on fossil fuels and enhance its competitiveness. Another source states that European leadership in development and deployment of clean-energy technologies translates to a global competitive advantage. But the speed of U.S. adoption of such technology may be tempered by several factors, including the relative cost of fossil fuels in the United States. The outlook Using waste carbon from industrial emissions as a feedstock for chemical manufacture appears to be a viable complement to industrial emitters’ ongoing abatement efforts. Many things are in flux: technologies are still being developed and scaled up; government policies are being implemented; business models are being established; funding is still being sought; the costs of installing the new technologies; and the supply and pricing of fossil fuels remain volatile. But steel companies, refineries and chemical companies are increasingly starting to use waste carbon emissions as feedstocks for chemicals and there are significant supplies of waste carbon from global industrial emissions worldwide for companies to use. These CCU technologies are promoting a paradigm shift that has the potential to increase firm-level competitiveness for manufacturers that adopt these processes, while also reducing the environmental impact of these manufacturers. On a sectoral basis, some sources estimate that the market potential for chemical production from waste carbon in industrial emissions, or even reduction of waste emissions in general, could be valued in the billions of dollars. Moreover, given estimates of potential reductions in production costs of about 20 to 50 percent (largely resulting from the feedstocks), chemical producers appear to be able to derive a competitive advantage regarding the pricing of many end products and, to the extent that they are partners in JVs with industrial emitters, they also may be able to increase market share and/or market coverage. Use of waste carbon feedstocks is also likely to allow companies to respond to carbon pricing programs and renewable energy mandates. Steel companies that can gain revenues from byproduct sales derived from their industrial emissions and offset emissions taxes and/or reduce other obligations under new mandates may be able to avoid reducing production in an increasingly competitive and oversupplied global market for steel with thin profit margins. Steel industries that adopt these sustainable technologies might be able to better survive oversupply conditions, carbon pricing programs, and renewable energy mandates than those that do not. These CCU technologies are promoting a paradigm shift that has the potential to increase firm-level competitiveness for manufacturers that adopt these processes, while also reducing the environmental impact of these manufacturers. To the extent that these technologies become widely adopted, they could result in substantial increases in supply of such chemicals globally, with potential disruptive impacts on trade and prices. Disclaimer: Office of Industries working papers are the result of the ongoing professional research of USITC staff and solely represent the opinions and professional research of individual authors. This article does not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. International Trade Commission or any of its individual commissioners. Pull Quote The extent to which new CCU technologies become commercially successful is based on multiple factors, including proximity of the consuming entity to the source of the waste carbon… These CCU technologies are promoting a paradigm shift that has the potential to increase firm-level competitiveness for manufacturers that adopt these processes, while also reducing the environmental impact of these manufacturers. Topics Carbon Removal Chemicals & Toxics Carbon Capture Chemical Recycling Technology Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Shutterstock tonton Close Authorship

Original post:
Using waste carbon feedstocks to produce chemicals

Wood waste strengthens recycled concrete, new study finds

February 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Wood waste strengthens recycled concrete, new study finds

Research from the University of Tokyo’s Institute of Industrial Science has revealed that discarded concrete can be strengthened with the addition of wood waste. This pioneering technique promises to be an environmentally friendly way to enhance concrete structures while simultaneously reducing construction costs and curtailing carbon emissions . It is hoped that this groundbreaking new method will help make better use of old concrete and any waste plant or wood materials. With traditional methods, reusing old concrete is unfeasible. The research team’s first author, Li Liang, explained, “Just reusing the aggregate from old concrete is unsustainable, because it is the production of new cement that is driving climate change emissions.” The team, therefore, sought to find a better approach, particularly one that would “help promote the circular economy of concrete,” according to the University of Tokyo. Related: 11 green building materials that are way better than concrete The innovative process involves taking discarded concrete and grinding it into a powder. Wood waste is also sourced from sawdust, scrap wood and other agricultural waste. Rather than sending this wood off to landfills, it is instead leveraged in the concrete recycling process for the key ingredient, lignin. Lignin is an organic polymer that comprises wood’s vascularized tissue and accounts for wood’s rigidity. The concrete, now in powder form, is then combined with water and the lignin to form a mixture. This mixture is both heated and pressurized, allowing for the lignin to become an adhesive that fills the gaps between the concrete particles. What results is a newly formed concrete with stronger malleability than the original concrete. Additionally, the lignin makes this new, recycled concrete more biodegradable . “Most of the recycled products we made exhibited better bending strength than that of ordinary concrete,” said Yuya Sakai, team lead and senior author of the study. “These findings can promote a move toward a greener, more economical construction industry that not only reduces the stores of waste concrete and wood , but also helps address the issue of climate change .” + The University of Tokyo’s Institute of Industrial Science Via New Atlas Image via Philipp Dümcke

See the original post:
Wood waste strengthens recycled concrete, new study finds

Here’s what could go wrong with the circular economy — and how to keep it on track

October 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Here’s what could go wrong with the circular economy — and how to keep it on track

We must make sure that increasing the efficiency of our industrial systems doesn’t lead to more consumption.

The rest is here:
Here’s what could go wrong with the circular economy — and how to keep it on track

Britain promises net-zero emissions by 2050

June 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Britain promises net-zero emissions by 2050

Britain recently upped the ante on its commitment to fight climate change , promising to reach net-zero emissions by 2050. The new governmental plan is more ambitious than its original Climate Change Act from 2008, which pledged to reduce emissions by 80 percent. Prime Minister Theresa May claimed net-zero is a necessary step for Britain and a moral duty as well as a strategy to improve public health and reduce healthcare costs. Britain is the first G7 country to propose carbon neutrality, an ambitious goal that environmentalists hope will encourage other nations to follow suit and increase their Paris Agreement emission reduction commitments. Related: Labour party launches solar panel program for 1.75M homes According to Prime Minister May, Britain’s economy can continue to grow alongside the transition to renewable energy . “We have made huge progress in growing our economy and the jobs market while slashing emissions,” she said. Net-zero on a national level will mean that effectively all homes, transportation, farming and industries will not consume more energy than the country can generate through renewable energy. For certain cases where this is impossible, it will mean that companies and industries purchase carbon offsets. The roll out of this plan is to be determined but must include a variety of individual- and national-level actions, including a massive investment in the renewable energy industry as well as a reduction in meat consumption and flying and a total shift to electric cars, LED light bulbs and hydrogen gas heating. According to BBC, Prime Minister May also claimed that the U.K. “led the world to wealth through fossil fuels in the industrial revolution, so it was appropriate for Britain to lead in the opposite direction.” This claim erases the true legacy of the industrial revolution and the role Britain played, which includes environmental destruction, exacerbated inequality and economic exploitation of many nations — not wealth. Whether or not Britain is a world leader, its pledge might convince other nations to increase or at least stick to their commitments to reduce emissions . Via BBC Image via Sebastian Ganso

Excerpt from:
Britain promises net-zero emissions by 2050

Studio NAB wants to boost urban biodiversity with an insect hotel at a bus stop

June 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Studio NAB wants to boost urban biodiversity with an insect hotel at a bus stop

Waiting for the bus is usually a drag, but what if the experience could instead become an opportunity to be closer to nature? French design practice Studio NAB has reinterpreted the humble bus stop as a hub for biodiversity that offers a “hotel” for birds and insects of all varieties. Built from recycled materials and topped with a vegetated green roof, the proposed Hotel Bus Stop aims to promote the population of native pollinating insects and reconnect people to nature. Studio NAB designed the Hotel Bus Stop to serve five purposes: to promote the presence of pollinating insects; to bring adults and children closer to nature and promote environmental awareness and education; to showcase architecture constructed from recycled materials such as wood, cardboard and stainless steel; to introduce urban greenery and improve air quality with a vegetated roof and exposed plant wall; and to create “green jobs” for maintenance around the bus stops. Related: 6 fun, fantastic bus stops from around the world “A broad scientific consensus now recognizes the role of man in the decline of biomass and biodiversity in general and that of insects in particular,” Studio NAB explained in a project statement. “The use of pesticides in intensive agriculture, the destruction of natural habitats, excessive urbanization, global warming and various pollutions are at the origin of this hecatomb. Our hegemony allied to our conscience obliges us today to fulfill a role of ‘guardian’ and to allow the ‘living’ to take its place in order to fight against the erosion of our biodiversity.” Envisioned for city centers and “eco-neighborhoods,” The Hotel Bus Stop would provide more habitats for pollinating insects that are essential for our food system and gardens, from fruit trees and vegetables to ornamental flowers. Auxiliary insects would also benefit, such as lacewings and earwigs that feed on aphids, a common garden pest. The underside of the bus stop roof would include boxes to encourage nesting by various bird species found throughout the city. + Studio NAB Images via Studio NAB

Continued here:
Studio NAB wants to boost urban biodiversity with an insect hotel at a bus stop

Carbon capture is the only way to address the world’s climate blindspots

January 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Carbon capture is the only way to address the world’s climate blindspots

Science tells us that we need to use negative-emissions technologies to fight climate change — and that starts in the industrial sector.

Excerpt from:
Carbon capture is the only way to address the world’s climate blindspots

A new way to curb nitrogen pollution: Regulate fertilizer producers, not just farmers

January 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on A new way to curb nitrogen pollution: Regulate fertilizer producers, not just farmers

Make the industry better design out the superpollutant from fertilizers — don’t blame the consumers with few other options.

Original post:
A new way to curb nitrogen pollution: Regulate fertilizer producers, not just farmers

How to save a shelf-life: cutting down on food waste across its supply chain

January 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How to save a shelf-life: cutting down on food waste across its supply chain

Here’s how better packaging and labeling can help change throw-away culture.

Read the original here:
How to save a shelf-life: cutting down on food waste across its supply chain

Large scale 3D Printer capable of printing a motorcycle

December 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Large scale 3D Printer capable of printing a motorcycle

Just a few years ago, 3D printing capability was relatively new technology. A home 3D printer could perhaps create a single printed letter or figure if left to work overnight. Advancements in the industry have been fast and furious with new technology offering recognizably sci-fi-like options. While companies have made news with efforts to print homes for a solution to housing shortages or printed skin in the name of medical advancement, one company has created a prototype that proves transportation could be the next evolution of 3D printing. Created thanks to the advanced technology of a high-capacity printer, the NERA 3D-printed motorcycle prototype is the first fully functional model of its kind. NOWlab, the innovation department at BigRep, is the creative force behind the design. Based out of Germany, the company is putting tracks down as the world’s leader in large-scale 3D printers. Related: The world’s first 3D-printed steel bridge looks like it came from another planet The NERA was manufactured to show the potential of these printers. Note that the motorcycle is a prototype only and not for sale to the public. However, there is much to be learned from the prototype itself and it leans towards limitless potential in the industry. Components of the NERA are almost hard to comprehend when you realize that it all came out of a printer, far from the traditional production line of Yamaha or Harley Davidson. Literally from the ground up, this motorcycle has all non-electrical printed parts, 15 in all, that include tires, rim, frame, fork and seat. Not only are the parts printed, but they are stylistic and performance-based. For example, the airless tires with customized tread offer a design of strength and support. The rims are lightweight but durable, providing a smooth ride. Eight pivot joints provide forkless steering for easy maneuverability. Another unique engineering development is the lack of suspension, replaced by flexible bumpers. The Nera (N)ew (ERA) is powered by an electric engine, fitted into a customizable case. Related: This portable 3D skin printer can heal deep wounds in minutes We wouldn’t expect the company to stop driving innovation forward at any point soon with a focus on potential future uses of large-scale 3D printer capacity. “These exciting prototypes not only demonstrate the unprecedented capacity of FFF large-scale 3D printing technology in Additive Manufacturing,” said Stephan Beyer, PhD, CEO of BigRep GmbH. “They also emphasize our unique ability as the market’s innovation and thought leader to bring cutting-edge technologies from design to reality, providing an added-value market lead for our industrial customers.” + BigRep Gmb Images via BigRep GmbH

More:
Large scale 3D Printer capable of printing a motorcycle

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 8487 access attempts in the last 7 days.