A recycled brick wall runs through this breezy home in Australia

October 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Bright, breezy and surrounded by nature, the Cedar Lane House is a place of peaceful respite on the southern coast of Australia. Sydney-based architect and photographer Edward Birch designed the light-filled residence at the base of a mountain in Meroo Meadow. Spread out across 280 square meters, the linear home is anchored by a recycled brick wall that runs the length of the building and imbues the interior with warmth and softness. The Cedar Lane House is organized into three pavilion-like spaces linked by a central east-west hallway. While indoor-outdoor living is celebrated with ample glazing and a natural materials palette, the views are deliberately obscured from the entrance to create an element of surprise when visitors turn the corner and see spectacular landscape vistas through the living room’s walls of glass. In addition to the whitewashed recycled brick wall, the home interiors are dressed in Australian hardwood, white surfaces and other minimalist materials to keep the focus on the outdoors. The open-plan living spaces — including a living room, dining area and kitchen — occupy the heart of the home and branch off to an outdoor terrace and an indoor lounge on either side. The easternmost side of the home is defined by a master en suite with an outdoor shower and a spa. Three additional bedrooms, a rumpus room and an outdoor courtyard are located on the west side. The arrangement of spaces makes it easy for the homeowner to close off portions of the house depending on the number of people staying. Instead of main water connections, the house relies on recycled rainwater , which is collected in underground tanks and re-circulated around the building. Related: Passive solar home stays naturally cool without AC in Australia “From the recycled bricks, rough oak floor to the zinc bench top in the kitchen, the internal materials are intended to be imperfect, to mark and scratch and to tell the story of the lives lived inside the house,” Birch said in a project statement. “As the timber cladding silvers and the wash on the bricks get eroded away, the house ages gracefully and settles into the landscape around it.” + Edward Birch Via ArchDaily Images by Edward Birch

See the original post here: 
A recycled brick wall runs through this breezy home in Australia

The adorable Acorn tiny cabin is made of wood salvaged from an old mansion

October 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

We’ve seen a lot of tiny homes over the years, but the Acorn has to be one the most adorable designs we’ve ever come across. Created by the team from Ojai-based Humble Hand Craft, the sweet tiny home on wheels is built from reclaimed wood and felled trees, including the western cedar shingles that were salvaged from a mansion in Montecito, California. At just 16 feet long and 8.5 feet wide, the Acorn is one seriously tiny home on wheels, but its strategic and space-efficient layout makes the interior seem much bigger. Built on a trailer of the same dimensions, the Acorn takes us back to the basics of traditional cabin design with its warm facade of cedar shingles, a corrugated metal roof and a welcoming front porch. Related: This charming, solar-powered tiny home is handcrafted from reclaimed wood According to the builders at Humble Hand Craft, like most of their cabins, the Acorn was made out of wood salvaged from various sources. The Western Red Cedar shingles used to clad the small structure were reclaimed from an old mansion in California. The porch posts were made out of a dead tree that had fallen near one of the builder’s favorite hiking trails in Ojai. Much of the cabin’s interior, such as the trim and the front door, were made out of reclaimed redwood salvaged from a 5,000-gallon wine barrel found at a vineyard in Santa Cruz. The all-wooden interior creates a homey living space, enhanced with an abundance of natural light . A space-efficient layout was essential in designing the interior. To create more living space on the ground floor, a sleeping loft was installed on a platform. The living room, which is big enough for a small sofa and table, is kept warm and cozy thanks to the small wood-burning fireplace. The kitchen features a beautiful redwood countertop finished with a natural bio resin as well as plenty of storage and shelving to avoid clutter. + Humble Hand Craft Photography by Luke Williams via Humble Hand Craft

Original post:
The adorable Acorn tiny cabin is made of wood salvaged from an old mansion

This striking, gorge-inspired Sydney home celebrates outdoor play

August 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This striking, gorge-inspired Sydney home celebrates outdoor play

Soaring ceilings and natural light define the Iron Maiden House, a contemporary home that pays tribute to the local site context in Sydney’s lower North Shore. Designed by Darlington-based CplusC Architectural Workshop , the Iron Maiden House was created for a family of five and offers generously sized rooms that spill out to outdoor-facing areas. The dwelling’s asymmetrical mountain-like forms mimic the appearance of a natural gorge and even feature a series of linear ponds that cut lengthwise through the center of the home. Covering an area of 3,089 square feet, the Iron Maiden House consists of metal-clad angular volumes that the architects describe as their modern take on the gable houses typically found throughout the region. A solar study determined the orientation as well as the overall layout of the home to fill the interior with natural light. Meanwhile, the architects also added flowering creeping plants to the exterior for seasonal variation and to heighten the home’s likeness to a natural gorge. The interiors feature cathedral -like spaces with tall ceilings and white walls. Massive walls of glass and the ponds that bisect the house bring the outdoors in. The main living spaces—which also flow from indoors to out—as well as a guest en-suite bedroom, study and swimming pool are located on the ground floor while the master suite, a lounge and three additional bedrooms can be found upstairs. Related: Glass elements dramatically open up a solar-powered Sydney home “The home aims to elevate everyday activities,” note the architects. “Occupants are encouraged to pause and enjoy the view through a large window near the spiral stair and generous stair treads which meet nearby walls, forming a place to sit. Each room has a view through green space into different parts of the house. The sophisticated use of levels within the home creates distinct yet akin spaces.” The Iron Maiden House was also shortlisted in the 2018 World Architecture Festival and Houses Awards. + CplusC Architectural Workshop Via ArchDaily Images by Murray Fredericks and Michael Lassman

The rest is here:
This striking, gorge-inspired Sydney home celebrates outdoor play

UNStudio unveils twisting Green Spine high-rise proposal for Melbourne

August 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on UNStudio unveils twisting Green Spine high-rise proposal for Melbourne

Dutch architecture practice UNStudio and Australian firm Cox Architecture have unveiled “Green Spine,” their proposal for the $2-billion Southbank Precinct overhaul in Melbourne, Australia. Selected as part of a shortlist that includes the likes of BIG and OMA, UNStudio and Cox Architecture have envisioned a twisting, greenery-covered high-rise for the 6,191-square-meter Southbank by Beulah site. The mixed-use development will be integrated into the urban fabric with a wide array of programmatic features and indoor-outdoor spaces. The twisting “Green Spine” refers to the landscaped space on the street level that appears to seamlessly flow upward to wrap around the two towers and culminates in the “Future Gardens” at the top of the residential tower. The low podium will comprise the majority of the mixed-use spaces and be open to both residents and the wider community. The podium will include a marketplace, retail, entertainment areas and a BMW experience center. The development’s various podiums will cater to the city’s temporary exhibitions and are flexible enough to accommodate different uses from art shows to festivals. “This multifaceted spine is created by the splitting open of the potential single mass at its core, thereby forming two separate high rise structures and causing them to reveal the almost geological strata of their core layers as they rise above a light-filled canyon,” explains UNStudio. “As a result of this design intervention, the towers that result on either side can enjoy porous city views and vastly improved contextual links. The orientation of the Green Spine enables an extension of the public realm on the podium, the continuation of green onto the towers and facilitates orientation to the CBD and the Botanical Garden at the top of the towers.” Related: UNStudio designs cocoon-like pavilion made of 100% recyclable materials The landscaped buildings are expected to mitigate the urban heat island effect, absorb noise and fight against air pollution . The “Green Spine” will be constructed with materials and textures local and native to Australia. The buildings’ high-performance glass facade follows passive design strategies, while external shading fins control solar gain. Energy and water usage will also be minimized wherever possible. + UNStudio + Cox Architecture Images via UNStudio

Here is the original: 
UNStudio unveils twisting Green Spine high-rise proposal for Melbourne

An old bungalow is transformed into an award-winning home with a modern extension

July 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on An old bungalow is transformed into an award-winning home with a modern extension

Los Angeles-based Edward Ogosta Architecture has breathed new life into a 70-year-old bungalow by adding a modern extension fitted with massive windows. Named the Rear Window House, the Culver City home spans 1,450 square feet and was commissioned by clients who sought extra space for their growing family. The new addition respects the local architecture — predominately low-slung bungalows from the post-war era — and maintains the 3:12 roof slope shared by the existing house and surrounding residences. Wrapped in asphalt roofing shingles, the Rear Window House extension consists of a master suite along with a new laundry room, closet and library. The volume juts out toward the backyard and embraces the landscape with extruded aluminum window frames and a covered back porch with a concrete platform. The house’s axial path to the backyard was formed with the careful positioning of the addition, which was placed parallel to the existing garage. “Influenced by the California minimalism practiced by the Light and Space movement of the 1960s, Ogosta sought to create moments of clarity that conjure a serene, meditative experience,” said the firm in a project statement. “Through a careful sequencing of new spaces and strategically located apertures, Rear Window House opens itself up to become deeply integrated with the rear garden.” Related: Culver City Eco House fights back after being decimated by landslide The interiors of the existing home were updated to match that of the new addition. Inside, the architects added bleached oak floors and white walls to achieve a clean and minimalist aesthetic. The large windows pour an abundance of natural light inside; the most striking use of glazing can be seen in the master suite where a window wall offers the homeowners a seamless indoor-outdoor living experience. The Rear Window House, completed in 2016, received a 2018 AIA National Small Projects Award . + Edward Ogosta Architecture Via Dezeen Images via Steve King

Read more from the original source: 
An old bungalow is transformed into an award-winning home with a modern extension

The Eye of the Storm dome home can withstand hurricanes and it’s officially on the market

July 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The Eye of the Storm dome home can withstand hurricanes and it’s officially on the market

Beachfront homes on Sullivan’s Island off Charleston, South Carolina are among the most magnificent dwellings in the country. With vistas that seem to extend beyond infinity and backyards bordering Charleston Harbor, these upscale houses offer the ideal trio of magnificent ocean views, peace and tranquility – except, that is, during hurricane season . After Hurricane Hugo demolished his parents’ prized home on the island in 1989, George Paul, a builder and designer of dome structures , rebuilt the home, called Eye of the Storm, in collaboration with architect X Dilling in 1991. Now the hurricane-defying 650-ton dome home is up for sale by Pareto Real Estate with a price tag of $4.9M. The unique house, located at 2851 Marshall Blvd on Sullivan’s Island, stands out in the crowd of conventionally constructed homes and is situated only 230 feet from the water. Built from concrete, steel, and glass, the home takes the shape of a striking white dome, and it sits on a nearly ½-acre land parcel. Related: Escape the everyday in this Geodesic Dome House in Palm Springs The 3,571-square-foot home has three bedrooms and four baths on the upper level. The main floor has an open, freeform living, dining, and kitchen space that provides unhindered views of the surrounding areas since support beams are not necessary in domed configurations. The showcase fireplace design reflects the lines of the dome’s exterior. Extravagant granite counters were added to the kitchen in a 2018 restoration. To accommodate beachcombing guests, an additional bathroom, two shower rooms and a storage room comprise the 526-square-foot ground floor. Curved concrete walls throughout the home create a flow akin to that of the steady, mesmerizing ocean currents . A secluded, 159-square-foot deck borders the master bedroom and an enormous 889 square feet of deck space embraces the back of the home. Oversized glass openings on decks and balconies provide views that vary from fantastic to fearful, depending on the weather. + Dwell Images via Michael D. Royal/Pareto Real Estate

See original here: 
The Eye of the Storm dome home can withstand hurricanes and it’s officially on the market

Natural light floods this energy-efficient Dublin home from all sides

July 2, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Natural light floods this energy-efficient Dublin home from all sides

London and Dublin-based design practice Anthro Architecture recently completed Villa 9010, a light-filled dwelling that takes cues from the region’s breezy seaside vernacular. Located in Dakley, South County Dublin, the energy-efficient Villa 9010 was completed for a young family in the side garden of the client’s redbrick childhood home. Triple-glazed windows combined with underfloor heating, highly efficient insulation, an air-to-air heat pump and mechanical heat recovery ventilation ensure a low-energy footprint with a BER rating of A2. Villa 9010 is a contemporary, energy-efficient take on the nearby buildings found in the coastal village and is also inspired by the grandeur of the eye-catching 19th-century castellated school gates next door. Constructed in the place of the client’s former garage and boat shed, the new steel-framed and concrete masonry villa is divided into two levels, with the primary living spaces placed on the ground floor while the four bedrooms are located above. A cantilevered oak staircase that connects the two floors serves as a focal point and the open risers offer views to the sunken living area and rear garden. “The Client[s] were drawn to the sense of optimism and escape that comes with a seaside villa and sought to create a light-filled energy efficient home suitable for a young family that was in-line with their modest budget,” wrote Anthro Architecture in a statement. “Defined by the imposing 19th century castellated gates to the neighbouring school, the design carefully carves a space for a new residential dwelling, nestling itself respectfully beside its prominent neighbour while also drawing on the wider context of the bright seaside villas in the surrounding area.” Related: Incredible glass home stays comfortably snug even in extreme temperatures The interiors are minimally dressed with white walls and oak floors that emphasize the play of light throughout the home. Aluminum-framed timber glazing overlooks views of the outdoors. The most light-filled space in the house is undoubtedly the double-height library illuminated by skylights and a large south-facing triple-glazed atrium . + Anthro Architecture Images by Ste Murray

See more here: 
Natural light floods this energy-efficient Dublin home from all sides

Breezy Verandah House embraces indoor-outdoor living in India

June 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Breezy Verandah House embraces indoor-outdoor living in India

A curvilinear form, large glazed windows, and a natural material palette tie this spacious contemporary home into lush surroundings on the outskirts of Ahmedabad in western India. Ahmedabad-based architecture firm MODO Designs crafted the breezy home—named The Verandah House—for their clients, the Munshaw family, who sought a home that would embrace the outdoors and be filled with natural light. The home’s curvaceous form derives its inspiration from an old ancestral house as well as from the existing natural topography and features. Located on a lushly planted four-acre plot, the 6,781-square-foot Verandah House serves as an antidote to city living. The clients previously owned a 20th-century colonial style house in a densely populated area in Ahmedabad and desired a new home that avoided “a rigid box formation.” The brief called for an indoor-outdoor design with large interiors to accommodate the family’s collection of artifacts, paintings, Persian rugs, books and ancestral furniture. The home is defined by a spacious veranda with a cantilevered roof that wraps around the east side of the home. The house bends to optimize views of the lily pond, which can be seen from the entry veranda as well as the lower and upper verandas. Inside, the house is organized around a daylit central spine that divides the living room, dining area, library and master bedroom from the secondary bedrooms, kitchen and storage areas housed in the rear bay. A large parking deck occupies the north end of the site. Related: This luxury Miami home brings the tropical landscape indoors “The house is a fusion of raw character of outdoor spaces and the finesse of the interiors,” wrote the architects. “The exterior material palette is natural jute panels on the curving beam face, Valsadi wood paneling, and doors, concrete ceilings, terracotta colored rough surface and rough Kotah stone flooring. This is further complemented by old renovated wood and cane furniture in the verandah spaces. The interior space, in contrast, has white walls, polished Kotah stone. The interior space fuses old and customized new furniture along with lots of artifacts, paintings, and Persian rugs.” + MODO Designs Via ArchDaily Images by Bharat Aggarwal

View original here:
Breezy Verandah House embraces indoor-outdoor living in India

This luxury Miami home brings the tropical landscape indoors

May 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This luxury Miami home brings the tropical landscape indoors

Cape Town-based architecture firm SAOTA has completed a luxury waterfront home in Miami that boasts envious views toward the Atlantic Ocean and Miami Beach. Sandwiched between the Indian Creek Canal and Pine Tree Drive in the city’s historic Collins Waterfront district, the expansive home—called the Pine Tree Residence—prioritizes an indoor-outdoor living environment. The home also derives inspiration from the firm’s South African roots with its emphasis on the outdoors and “easy-living.” Completed as SAOTA’s first project in Miami, the Pine Tree family home is punctuated with palm trees and continuous views of water throughout. To take advantage of the site’s strong linear proportions, the architects installed large windows that allow for views straight through the home. The porosity of the home and the layout allow homeowners to enjoy views of the outdoors from almost any vantage point in the home. The Pine Tree home also overlooks the activity of the canal ; however, punched anodized aluminum screens can be used to ensure privacy when needed. “The design is as much about containment as it is about the views through the many living spaces, towards the Atlantic Ocean and world-renowned Miami Beach,” says SAOTA director, Philip Olmesdahl. “While the overall contemporary architectural design is a key focus of the SAOTA design team, the use and connectivity of the spaces is the primary driver – how the house lives.” The pool dominates the home’s footprint and the amount of water on the site is about half of the six-bedroom house. The large pool courtyard offers a buffet of entertaining options and includes a hot tub, barbecue area, bar, and even a two-story waterslide that serves as a focal point at the pool pavilion. Related: Foster + Partners unveil plans for a pair of hurricane-resistant high rises in Miami The interior is awash in natural light and the spaces were designed in collaboration with Nils Sanderson. The contemporary and harmonious finishes and furnishings establish the home as a calm retreat from stressful city life. Warm tones are achieved through a mixture of timber and other materials such as callacatta and limestone.  Raymond Jungles designed the landscape. + SAOTA Images via SAOTA

View original here:
This luxury Miami home brings the tropical landscape indoors

Minimalist glasshouse in Australia adds a tropical resort-like twist

February 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Minimalist glasshouse in Australia adds a tropical resort-like twist

Sarah Waller of Sarah Waller Architecture seized on a chance to build her dream home after a move took her from the UK to Australia. Channeling her love of minimalism and mid-century modern architecture, she designed and built Glasshouse, a 660-square-meter home in Noosa, Australia. Full-height glass spans the length of the home and blur the distinction between indoor and outdoor living. Simple lines, a monochromatic palette, and ample glazing help integrate the spacious steel-framed home into the surroundings that have been transformed with lush landscaping for a more tropical feel. Timber and the addition of greenery throughout the interior help break up the mostly black and white palette inside and out. Sarah drew inspiration from Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House and the Philip Johnson Glasshouse . Related: Prefab Glass House lets you bring home the spirit of Philip Johnson’s masterpiece Luxury pervades Glasshouse, from the resort-like linear pool and cabana to the incredible master bathroom that opens up to a deep freestanding outdoor bath surrounded by greenery. The master bedroom is enveloped almost entirely in glass with framed views of coconut palm trees. Indoor and outdoor entertaining areas punctuate the home. + Sarah Waller Architecture Photos by Paul Smith Images

Read the original post:
Minimalist glasshouse in Australia adds a tropical resort-like twist

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1132 access attempts in the last 7 days.