One in four of world’s largest cities under water stress

February 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Cape Town, South Africa is rapidly approaching what has been called “Day Zero,” the moment when the diverse metropolitan area of nearly 4 million runs out of clean drinking water . While Cape Town has taken drastic measures to conserve water , it is simply not enough to avoid the imminent crisis. And now, as government and residents prepare for the worst, it’s important to understand which other major cities around the world are also at risk. Lack of water is truly a global problem; one in four of the world’s largest cities are currently under “water stress,” with that number expected to rise due to climate change, human activity, and population growth. Water shortages have the potential to aggravate already unstable political and economic conditions, which is of particular concern in cities such as Cairo . Currently confronting violent extremism and managing ongoing political tension, Egypt is also rated by the World Health Organization as ranking high among middle-income countries on the number of deaths related to water pollution. This is tied to increasing pollution in the Nile River. The United Nations estimates that Egypt will suffer critical water shortages by 2025, exacerbating the potential for conflict. Similarly, São Paulo and Moscow are plagued by pollution due to poor public policy decisions. Fortunately, this means that the problem may be fixable, however entrenched it might be. Related: Venice’s canals go dry following weeks without rain Coastal cities like Jakarta and Miami are facing unique water problems as both attempt to pull freshwater from aquifers. Due to lack of public access to piped water, residents of Jakarta have dug illegal wells, draining the underlying aquifer and actually causing the land to sink. As a result, about 40 percent of Jakarta now lies below sea level. While Miami may not be sinking, its freshwater reserves are suffering from seawater contamination as a result of rapid sea level rise and wetland habitat destruction. Even cities like London are facing a water-scarce future, with severe shortages expected by 2040. Governments can make the necessary policy changes to solve this problem, but they must act quickly. The water crisis is already upon us in many cities. Via BBC News Images via Depositphotos (1) (2)

Continued here:
One in four of world’s largest cities under water stress

Clothing company removes 1,000,000 pounds of trash from global waters

February 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Fast fashion is a dirty business, and the apparel industry is considered one of the world’s most toxic, second only to the oil industry when it comes to pollution. Some big labels are keen to tout their greenwashed textiles or “responsible” material sourcing, but few have taken measures to reduce waste. Enter  United By Blue , a sustainable fashion line that not only uses eco-friendly materials in the manufacturing of its products but has made a commitment to removing one pound of trash from global oceans and waterways for every product sold. The model, which was introduced in 2010, has so far led to the removal of 1,039,456 pounds of trash across 27 states—and counting. The initiative is wholly backed by United by Blue’s employees and like-minded volunteers looking to make a difference. Over 200 cleanups have been organized thus far, and everything from  plastic bottles , tires, appliances, to abandoned trucks have been scooped out of rivers, streams, creeks, and beaches. What’s more, United by Blue has budgeted time, resources, and money into its business plan for cleanups, and employees are paid for their contributions. Related: Billions of pieces of plastic trash are sickening the world’s coral reefs As it stands, eight million tons of plastic enter oceans each year with plastic bottles accounting for 1.5 million tons. There is almost no part of the world that has been untouched by the pollution , which endangers sea life and ends up in our food when we consume seafood that has unwittingly ingested plastic. Even scarier, in a recent study , researchers looked at more than 124,000 corals from 159 reefs in Myanmar, Thailand, Indonesia, and Australia, and found that plastic has ravaged the reefs. “We came across chairs, chip wrappers, Q-tips, garbage bags, water bottles, old nappies,” Joleah Lamb, a marine disease ecologist at Cornell University and lead author of the study, told the Atlantic . “Everything you see on the beach is probably lying on the reef.” Nearly 90 percent of corals that come into contact with plastic will get some sort of infection. Lamb and her colleagues reported that almost every time they lifted a piece of plastic shrouding coral, the coral was riddled with disease. Here’s hoping that more clothing companies follow United By Blue’s model so we can end this scourge once and for all. + United by Blue Via Treehugger

See more here:
Clothing company removes 1,000,000 pounds of trash from global waters

Super blue blood moon eclipse to occur for the first time in 150 years

January 4, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Super blue blood moon eclipse to occur for the first time in 150 years

On January 31, turn your eyes to the sky, because the moon is going to do something that it hasn’t done in a century and a half. On the last day of the month, lucky celestial viewers are going to witness a super blue blood moon eclipse. So what is a super blue blood moon eclipse? Let’s break it down. The supermoon is when the full moon is closest to the Earth, so it looks extremely bright and big. A blue moon is when the moon is full for a second time in a calendar month. Then, while all that is happening, there is going to be a total lunar eclipse . And as if that wasn’t enough, it’s also going to be a blood moon at the same time – something that occurs when blue light filters out of the atmosphere during an eclipse, making the moon appear red. Related: Missed the Blood Moon? Watch the Event Unfold Through NASA’s Stunning Footage In the U.S., the eclipse itself won’t be very visible except in Hawaii and Alaska. But viewers in New Zealand, Australia, parts of Asia, and Indonesia are in for a real treat. And in case you were wondering, the answer is no. The super blue blood moon eclipse doesn’t mean anything special, except that it is an exciting convergence of multiple interesting lunar phenomena. Via Phys.org Images via Deposit Photos ( 1 , 2 )

See the original post here:
Super blue blood moon eclipse to occur for the first time in 150 years

"Garbage emergency" declared in Bali as clean-up unfolds

December 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on "Garbage emergency" declared in Bali as clean-up unfolds

The Indonesian island of Bali recently declared a “garbage emergency” in response to the overwhelming amount of plastic waste that has floated ashore and spoiled pristine beaches. “When I want to swim, it is not really nice. I see a lot of garbage here every day, every time,” said Vanessa Moonshine, a traveler from Australia told 24Matins . Although places in Indonesia have been described as “paradise on earth,” the nation of more than 17,000 islands has some work to do to reclaim its title and is mobilizing clean-up efforts to do so. Indonesia is the world’s second largest contributor to marine debris, outdone only by China , the most populous country in the world. In addition to degrading the beaches , plastic waste blocks waterways, impacting transportation and increasing flooding risk, while posing a risk to marine animals. The waste issue has become so debilitating that Bali officially declared a “garbage emergency” over a 3.7 mile segment of coastline last month, prompting the mobilization of resources. 700 cleaners with 35 trucks removed 100 tons of debris each day from the area, which includes the popular beaches of Jimbaran, Kuta and Seminyak. Related: Indonesia pledges $1 billion annually to tackle ocean pollution problem While economic concerns may have motivated this particular cleanup, the dangers of plastic waste are more insidious than loss of tourism. “Garbage is aesthetically disturbing to tourists, but plastic waste issue is way more serious,” I Gede Hendrawan, an environmental oceanography researcher from Bali’s Udayana University, told AFP . “Microplastics can contaminate fish which, if eaten by humans, could cause health problems including cancer.” Fortunately, Indonesia is taking action. The nation of 261 million has pledged to reduce marine plastic waste by 70 percent by 2025, in part by boosting recycling programs and reducing plastic bag usage. Local inventors have even created a type of biodegradable plastic made from seaweed , an abundant crop in Indonesia. Via 24Matins Images via Depositphotos (1)

Originally posted here:
"Garbage emergency" declared in Bali as clean-up unfolds

The spinning house uses the force of hurricanes to anchor itself to the ground

December 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The spinning house uses the force of hurricanes to anchor itself to the ground

This futuristic, hurricane-proof home is cleverly designed to use the force of storms to withstand extreme wind loads. Margot Krasojevi? Architects designed house to rotate around a helicoid retaining wall, burying itself into the land. The stronger the storm, the more tenaciously the home anchors itself to the earth. The Self-Excavation Hurricane House’s main living spaces are located in a precast reinforced concrete frame. This lightweight structure has a series of rubber-coated, concertina wall sections that provide the flexibility to adapt while the home rotates. Related: Floating, solar-powered ‘dragonfly’ bridge can sail to new locations The house is set upon an artificial island that is landscaped to flush flood water away from the main living areas. The surrounding topsoil directs water to deeper soil that functions as a bioswale . The wetland absorbs and temporarily stores floodwater, releasing it slowly into its surroundings. This part of the project helps with land reclamation and water purification . + Margot Krasojevi? Architects

Go here to read the rest:
The spinning house uses the force of hurricanes to anchor itself to the ground

100% biodegradable, edible packaging is so much better than plastic

November 29, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 100% biodegradable, edible packaging is so much better than plastic

The world is awash in pollution from plastic packaging – but fortunately, some people are working hard to develop viable eco-friendly alternatives. Indonesia -based Evoware makes food packaging out of an unexpected material: seaweed . Instead of clogging our oceans, the non-toxic seaweed-based packaging biodegrades – and it’s even edible. Evoware’s 100 percent biodegradable packaging lasts for two years on the shelf, and is printable and heat sealable. It’s also a natural plant fertilizer. You can eat the packaging, taking advantage of the high fiber, mineral, and vitamin content. It could serve as a hamburger wrapping, for example, and there’d be no need to remove the packaging before eating the burger. Or it could hold instant noodle seasoning, and when a consumer poured in warm water to make the noodles, the packaging would dissolve. Evoware on their website describes their product as “almost tasteless and odorless.” The seaweed packaging can also form sachets to hold non-food items such as soap or sanitary pads. Related: Egyptian scientists turn dried shrimp shells into eco-friendly plastic Environmental challenges motivate the company, as Indonesia is the second largest contributor of ocean plastic . But co-founder David Christian said in a video they also aim to help poor seaweed farmers in the country. Indonesia is the biggest seaweed-producing country, according to Christian – but many of the farmers, due to a long marketing chain, don’t make enough money or are in debt to loan sharks. Their children are malnourished and can’t attend school. And unfortunately, a lot of the seaweed is wasted right now, he added. Evoware aims to use it, and increase these farmers’ incomes by turning seaweed into zero waste packaging. The company said on their website, “Through Evoware’s products, people evolve to be closer to nature and live a more responsible and sustainable life.” You can find out more here . + Evoware Images via Evoware

More:
100% biodegradable, edible packaging is so much better than plastic

Shocking investigation reveals 70,000 dogs in Bali murdered and served to tourists every year

June 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Shocking investigation reveals 70,000 dogs in Bali murdered and served to tourists every year

Each year 70,000 dogs are brutally killed in Bali , Indonesia, according to an investigation spearheaded by Animals Australia (AA). The animals are strangled, bludgeoned, or poisoned and then fed to tourists who think they’re eating chicken meat. AA estimates seven times more dogs are killed in Bali yearly than in the Yulin Dog-Eating Festival in China. Evidence obtained by ABC’s 7.30 program revealed a huge dog meat trade in Bali. An AA undercover investigator spent four months posing as a documentary maker to uncover details about the trade. Known simply as ‘Luke,’ the investigator said he started by getting to know key players in the unregulated industry, and “eventually, they invited me to join them as their gangs stole, hunted, poisoned, and killed dogs.” Related: Dogs raised for meat in South Korea to get forever homes in the US AA campaign director Lyn White said, “Tourists will walk down a street, they’ll see a street store selling satay but what they are not realizing is the letters RW on the store mean it is dog meat being served. They’re just sitting down ordering satay have no idea that they’re eating dog.” And it’s not just street vendors selling the meat to tourists as chicken, but restaurants as well. The Bali Animal Welfare Association, an organization working to rescue the animals from dog traders, has discovered 70 restaurants serving dog meat. It’s not illegal to consume dog meat in Bali. But White said it is illegal to kill animals cruelly or to consume meat tainted with poison. Luke described aggressive methods and said although he’s trained himself to cope with cruelty, in one village where he saw dogs being caught, nothing had prepared him for the brutality. On one occasion he witnessed hunters catching dogs by laying out fish meat laced with cyanide. For the first time in his career, he switched off his camera as he watched a puppy die over agonizing minutes. He said, “I sat stroking him as he died and found myself apologizing for the cruelty of my fellow man.” According to ABC, while some local people think dog meat is healthy, the practice isn’t a long-held tradition. Hindu leader Gusti Ngurah Harta is among those working to end the trade – he said Bali Hindus consider dogs to be a holy animal and that it’s upsetting people are eating them. AA is willing to partner with the Bali government to end the trade and find a positive solution, which may include compensating those who make their living in the trade. You can sign their petition for the governor of Bali here . Via Animals Australia , ABC , and International Business Times Images via Pexels and Pixabay

See the original post here: 
Shocking investigation reveals 70,000 dogs in Bali murdered and served to tourists every year

School principal uses $22,000 of paint to transform former slum into a rainbow wonderland

May 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on School principal uses $22,000 of paint to transform former slum into a rainbow wonderland

We all know a fresh coat of paint does wonders for a room but what about repainting an entire town? That’s exactly what this small village in Indonesia did and the results are nothing short of spectacular. Armed with just $22,000 worth of paint, Kampung Pelangi transformed their village in Semarang into a multicolored wonderland and Instagrammer’s paradise . Kampung Pelangi was formerly known as Kampung Wonosari and a slum in a prior life. But thanks to the colorful makeover, the village has been skyrocketed into an international tourist destination. #Repost @lutfianaa18 with @repostapp ??? Angel?? #desawisatabejalen #kaliwernobejalen #bejalen #kampungpelangi A post shared by Desa Wisata Bejalen (@desa_wisata_bejalen) on May 15, 2017 at 3:37pm PDT – Rame ya warnanya ? . pict by @septiyan_dwi_cahya . . ? Kampung Pelangi Kalisari, Semarang – . #semarangexplore #kampungpelangi #kampungpelangikalisari #kampungpelangisemarang #eksploresemarang A post shared by EXPLORE SEMARANG (@semarangexplore) on May 9, 2017 at 9:39pm PDT The Kampung Pelangi aka. Rainbow Village. The rainbow village in Indonesia, called Kampung Pelangi, is trending on social media after a government-funded project transformed it into a vibrant Instagram hotspot. The once struggling village, originally named Kampung Wonosari, located in Randusari in the South Semarang district, was considered a slum before the local government officials decided to turn things around. – #6s #kampong #slumarea #kampungpelangi #semarang #blusukanSMG #streetventurejkt #makkiimages2017 A post shared by Safir Makki (@safirmakki) on May 15, 2017 at 4:35am PDT Kampung Pelangi Kota Semarang~ Mantaaaapppp ??? #semarang #kotasemarang #jawatengah #semaranghits #semarangcity #kampungpelangi #semaranghebat #wisatasemarang #semarangexplore #wisata #indonesia A post shared by J Roymond BP (@roymondbp) on May 12, 2017 at 1:55am PDT The stunning transformation was the brainchild of Slamet Widodo, a local high school principal who wanted to beautify his town and attract visitors. Mayor of Semarang, Hendrar Prihadi, secured a budget of Rp 300 million (approximately $22,000 USD) and even helped the villagers with painting. The Indonesian Builders Association in Semarang provided paint and additional help. Hello Semarang, this is featured from @riza_fe taken at #kampungpelangi Want to be the next featured? Tag your best photos with #randomsemarang A post shared by #RANDOMSEMARANG (@randomsemarang) on May 12, 2017 at 3:57am PDT bagus yah? nice picture cute models #kampungpelangi #rainbowvillage #banjarbarupunya #sumberadi A post shared by andini giovalany, southborneo (@lalan_lingling) on May 15, 2017 at 10:01pm PDT Temenan itu kyk AADC = APA AJA DI CANDAIN ?? #ambarawa #ambarawahitz #kampungpelangi #threesecondmoment #lfl #followforfollow A post shared by tortor (@iqbaltoriq06) on May 15, 2017 at 8:38pm PDT Setiap hal nang pian ketujui.Manggambarakan siapa diri pian sebujurnya.Jadi mun pian ketuju lawan hal nang baik, itu artinya ada kebaikan dalam diri pian.Kaya itu jua sebaliknya. #fotografer @rizkiamalia_aya ?? . #kampungpelangi #ngehitz #banjarmasin #like4like #kalian #bumiketupat #kandangan #banjarbarupunya A post shared by Ardy Agata (@anak_singkung) on May 15, 2017 at 7:32pm PDT @Regrann from @isnaininurul51 – Andaiku punya sayap.. ? . #abaikankostumnya #bukansalahkostum #kampungpelangi #bejalen #ambarawa #semarang #semaranghits #dolansemarang – #regrann A post shared by Jan De Hert ?? (@dehertjan) on May 15, 2017 at 3:18pm PDT Related: Indonesia pledges $1 billion annually to tackle ocean pollution problem The freshly painted village is home to 223 rainbow -colored homes and the mayor hopes to extend that number to 390. Each house was painted at least three different colors and some feature artwork . Colorful Indonesia! ?? #colors #colorful #indonesia #village #decouverte #travel #voyage #kampungpelangi A post shared by Open Minded (@openmindedmag) on May 15, 2017 at 8:51am PDT Semarang juga punya…. @semarangexplore #rainbow #kampungpelangi #semaranghebat #semaranghits #semarangcity #kotasemarang #DISTARUHEBAT #pasarkembangkalisari #gunungbrintik #visitsemarang #visitjateng #wisatasemarang #exploresemarang #semarangexplore #photoshop A post shared by Achmad Syarifudin (@jalidin) on May 15, 2017 at 6:55am PDT Pilih lah jalan yang benar untuk masa depan #malangmegilan #malangkotadingin #kampungpelangi A post shared by fian (@ahmadfian14) on May 15, 2017 at 5:59am PDT Benches and bridges also received the colorful treatment. The social project, which was completed last month, is heralded as a success in rejuvenating the town, uniting the community, and stimulating the local economy with an influx of tourists. Via Archdaily Images by Arie Prakman Nek misale urip mu kurang berwarna.. cobo dolano mrene.. ? . . . . . . . . . #kampungtridi #kampungtridimalang #kampungpelangi #visitmalang #exploremalang #goesmalang #malang #malanghits #myexplorer #ootd #mbolang #damnilovemalang #damniloveindonesia #parapetualang #parapejalan #idpetualang #nvlindonesia #nvljatim #yicam #yicamera #warnawarni #indonesiaituindah #instaphotography #instaadict #instaadventure #instagram #like4like #like4follow #likeforfollow A post shared by Rizky ardhyanto (@rizky_ardhy) on May 15, 2017 at 4:46am PDT Kampung Pelangi Semarang…mengubah yang kusam menjadi indah berwarna-warni…#kampungpelangi #kampungtematik A post shared by endang sukarjati (@endangsjati) on May 15, 2017 at 3:56am PDT The Kampung Pelangi aka. Rainbow Village. The rainbow village in Indonesia, called Kampung Pelangi, is trending on social media after a government-funded project transformed it into a vibrant Instagram hotspot. The once struggling village, originally named Kampung Wonosari, located in Randusari in the South Semarang district, was considered a slum before the local government officials decided to turn things around. – #6s #kampong #slumarea #kampungpelangi #semarang #blusukanSMG #streetventurejkt #makkiimages2017 A post shared by Safir Makki (@safirmakki) on May 15, 2017 at 3:23am PDT Nongkrong dulu ..#semarang #semarangan #semaranghits #dolansemarang #kampungpelangi #semarangbaru A post shared by D Mahendra Putra (@mahendra__putra) on May 15, 2017 at 2:55am PDT Kampung pelangi .. Warna warni seperti dirimu … #semaranghits #dolansemarang #semarang #semarangan #kampungpelangi A post shared by D Mahendra Putra (@mahendra__putra) on May 14, 2017 at 10:10pm PDT Musim hujan.. Sedia payung sebelum hujan?????? Payung Kehidupan bersamamu untuk memulai msa depan yg cerah..?? . Ekspresikan gayamu dgn grafiti cantik dan menarik di kampung pelangi?? . Loc: Kampoeng Pelangi, Banjarbaru . . . . #visitkalsel #wargabanua #infobanjar #banjarinfo #seputarbanjar #klikbanjar #instakalsel #instabanjar #shalokalwisatalokerbanjar #kampungpelangi #banjarbaru A post shared by Fahrina Supianida, S.Ars (@rierinryukyu) on May 14, 2017 at 9:02pm PDT Hello hari gini masih fobia menutup aurat??? Fobia kalo dijemput Allah pas lg ngumbar aurat ??? #kampungpelangi #wisatabanjarbaru #gerakanberhijab #pulkadot #monocrome #seputarbanjar #beraniberhijrah #mariberhijab #hijrah #hijabfashion #huntingphoto #hijablover #hijabsyari #huntingfoto #banjarbaru #explorekalsel #explorebanjarbaru #catatanhati #wanitahijab #pinklovers #photoshoot? #photography #muslimah #sahabatsholehah #instakalsel #jalanjalan #weekend #instakalsel #hijabindonesia #muslimahbanua #wanitahijab #gerakanberanisyari A post shared by Ainur Yusridha Jannati (@ai_nezt) on May 14, 2017 at 5:37am PDT #kampungpelangi #ngarames #semarang #semaranghits A post shared by Tyok Br@ndyz (@fuadprastyo25) on May 14, 2017 at 5:38am PDT #wisatadadakan #kampungpelangi #kalisari #explore #wisatasemarang #dolansemarang A post shared by Leo_Zodiak_Ku (@ponco.haryadi) on May 14, 2017 at 1:58am PDT

Read more from the original source: 
School principal uses $22,000 of paint to transform former slum into a rainbow wonderland

Indonesian president gives forest management back to indigenous communities

February 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Indonesian president gives forest management back to indigenous communities

After decades of conflict over the power to oversee Indonesia’s forests, President Joko Widodo gave management rights back to nine indigenous communities. According to the World Agroforestry Centre, millions of indigenous people cared for forests sustainably for centuries until the Dutch colonial government declared state ownership, and this moment marks an important milestone in the acknowledgement of indigenous rights . For years, indigenous communities have fought for recognition as their rights have been contested by the government – even after independence in 1945, according to the World Agroforestry Centre. There are thousands of distinct ethnic groups across the islands of Indonesia, and Widodo recently took what the center described as a highly symbolic step in formally granting forest management titles to the nine indigenous communities. In a speech on the occasion, Widodo said, “Recognition also means an appreciation of Indonesia’s original values and its identity as a nation.” Related: Indonesian president announces plan to halt palm oil industry expansion Widodo cited the Kajang people, one of the nine communities, in his speech as an example from which others could benefit. An earlier national government altered the Kajang’s forests’ management status from indigenous to “production forests with limited uses” so the government could control them and parcel some land out for rubber plantations. But the Kajang developed “a set of local regulations that affirm, recognize, and protect based on traditional management,” according to Andi Adriardi, a member of a non-governmental organization that helped the Kajang regain rights. They coordinated with the local government and organizations to reclaim the title. Adriardi said the government recognized their case as a “good lesson that approaches perfection” for a well-managed forest. Kajang leader Andi Buyung Saputra, pictured above with Widodo, said in his acceptance speech, “Our traditional wisdom has played an important role in managing and preserving our forests. This has contributed to keeping our Earth greener and reducing the negative impacts of climate change .” Via World Agroforestry Centre Images via World Agroforestry Centre and Wikimedia Commons

Go here to see the original: 
Indonesian president gives forest management back to indigenous communities

Kengo Kuma unveils blossoming glass and timber villas for Bali

January 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Kengo Kuma unveils blossoming glass and timber villas for Bali

From Ibuku’s gorgeous bamboo structures to D-Associates’wood and brick DRA House , Bali’s contemporary architecture strikes a delicate balance between contemporary and vernacular design. Among the most recent projects planned to be built on this Indonesian island is a cluster of six unique villas, a yoga pavilion and a greenhouse designed by Kengo Kuma . The 215,000-square-foot project named Tsubomi Villas, or “flower bud” in Japanese, will include six villas enveloped in overlapping layers of wood that form hyperbolic paraboloid roof canopies . The buildings, planned to be built on a sandstone cliff on the Bukit Peninsula, the southernmost point of Bali , look like they emerge from the ground like flowers. Related: Kengo Kuma unveils plans for spiraling timber-clad library in Sydney The Tsubomi Villas combine glass and timber to provide a feeling of openness and tranquility. The design blurs the line between interior spaces and the surrounding landscape, inviting the lush forest inside. + Kengo Kuma & Associates Via Architizer

See the original post:
Kengo Kuma unveils blossoming glass and timber villas for Bali

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1501 access attempts in the last 7 days.