Gold miners claim they butchered uncontacted Amazon tribe members in Brazil

September 11, 2017 by  
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Around 10 tribe members who had little to no contact with the outside world are now dead in Brazil . The uncontacted Amazon tribe members were collecting eggs by a river when it appears they encountered gold miners, who later boasted about the killings in a bar. Federal prosecutors have started an investigation, but the incident may reveal that dangers to endangered indigenous groups in the country are growing. The gold miners said they had to kill the uncontacted tribe members or be killed, according to Leila Silvia Burger Sotto-Maior of Funai , the country’s agency on indigenous affairs. The killings reportedly happened last month, and were alleged to have taken place in the Javari Valley, Brazil’s second-biggest indigenous reserve. The gold miners had a hand-carved paddle they said came from the tribe, according to Funai. Related: Watch as Isolated Amazon Tribe Makes Contact With the Outside World for the First Time Sotto-Maior, who is the coordinator for recently contacted and uncontacted tribes, said, “It was crude bar talk. They even bragged about cutting up the bodies and throwing them in the river.” Funai lodged a complaint with the Amazonas prosecutor’s office. Prosecutor Pablo Luz de Beltrand said he investigated a similar episode earlier this year. In February, uncontacted Indians were reported killed, and the case is open. Beltrand said, “It was the first time that we’d had this kind of case in the region. It’s not something that was happening before.” Brazil’s president Michel Temer ‘s government has reduced funding for indigenous affairs, and in April Funai shut down five of 19 bases they use to watch and protect isolated tribes. At other bases, they cut staffing. These bases are used to prevent invasions from miners and loggers, and connect with tribes that have recently been contacted. Sarah Shenker, senior campaigner with global indigenous rights group Survival International , said, “If the investigation confirms the reports, it will be yet another genocidal massacre resulting directly from the Brazilian government’s failure to protect isolated tribes – something that is guaranteed in the Constitution…When their land is protected, they thrive. When their land is invaded, they can be wiped out.” Via The New York Times Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Gold miners claim they butchered uncontacted Amazon tribe members in Brazil

Floridians rescue Manatees stranded on shores drained by Irma

September 11, 2017 by  
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Of all the destructive impacts of a hurricane , with its life-threatening storm surges and massive flooding, the sudden lack of aquatic habitat is not a typical concern. However, bays and canals drained by Hurricane Irma’s intense storm system were exactly the threats facing Florida’s aquatic wildlife over the weekend, including manatees. Michael Sechler of Sarasota, Florida , saw these stranded creatures beached where formerly there was water and took action to save them. Law enforcement and other locals also arrived to offer a helping hand and, together, the Floridians carried the manatees, which can easily weigh over 600 pounds, back into the sea. The manatees beached in Sarasota and other parts of Florida along Irma’s path suffered from an unusual phenomenon in which water was pulled away from typically submerged shores while areas above sea level suffered flooding. As the storm approached places like Tampa, strong winds pushed water out of shallow bays and canals and into a storm surge elsewhere. “As soon as the wind shifts direction, the water will come back quickly and continue to move inland,” said CNN meteorologist Judson Jones. Although the wind temporarily removed water from the area, it returned with strength. “After the storm center passes Tampa, the wind will change from offshore to onshore and push water and large ocean surface waves onshore,” said Shuyi Chen, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. Related: Snooty, the world’s oldest living manatee in captivity, dies at age 69 While the water was low, Sechler and his friends traveled out to where the manatees were trapped. “My friends and I couldn’t move these massive animals ourselves, and we called every service we could think of, but no one answered,” said Sechler. “We gave them as much water as we could, hoping the rain and storm surge [would] come soon enough to save them.” Eventually, fellow citizens and law enforcement officers arrived to assist in the rescue operation. The animals were rolled up in a tarp, then carried the 100 yards to the open ocean. Now that Irma has passed through Sarasota, the manatees and their rescuers can expect more peaceful seas. Via The Telegraph and CNN Images via cyberartist/Flickr ,  Marcelo Clavijo/Facebook  and  Tony Foradini-Campos/Facebook

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Floridians rescue Manatees stranded on shores drained by Irma

New Zealand river world’s first to obtain legal staus as a person

March 16, 2017 by  
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A river in New Zealand now has legal status similar to a human being, marking a historic victory for indigenous people. For over 100 years, the Whanganui Iwi have fought over the rights of the Whanganui River, the country’s longest navigable river . Now the New Zealand Parliament has recently passed the Te Awa Tupua Bill , or Whanganui River Claims Settlement Bill, acknowledging past wrongs and declaring the river “an indivisible and living whole.” The Whanganui River can now be represented through two human representatives, one appointed by the New Zealand government and the other by the Whanganui Iwi. Treaty Negotiations Minister Chris Finlayson told Newshub, “I know some people will say it’s pretty strange to give a natural resource a legal personality, but it’s no stranger than family trusts, or companies, or incorporated societies.” A $56 million financial redress payment is also part of the significant legislation. Related: Indonesian president gives forest management back to indigenous communities It’s been a long battle for the Whanganui Iwi. According to the bill, “Since 1873, Whanganui Iwi have sought recognition of their authority over the River, including by pursuing one of New Zealand’s longest-running court cases.” Whanganui Iwi spokesperson Gerrard Albert said the people have challenged the government’s impact on the river’s health since the mid-1850’s, and sought recognition of their rights over the river. In a statement he said, “We have always believed that the Whanganui River is an indivisible and living whole – Te Awa Tupua – which includes all its physical and spiritual elements from the mountains of the central North Island to the sea.” A government website adds, “The tribes of Whanganui take their name, their spirit, and their strength from the great river…The people say, ‘Ko au te awa. Ko te awa ko au’ (I am the river. The river is me).” Over 200 Whanganui Iwi descendants were present in Parliament as the bill passed, and sang songs after the third and final bill reading. Via EcoWatch Images via Alex Indigo on Flickr and eyeintim on Flickr

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New Zealand river world’s first to obtain legal staus as a person

Amazing Hoop Dance Gathering Place celebrates Canada’s indigenous cultures

August 31, 2016 by  
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The project, located in a large courtyard on the Mohawk College campus, was developed in collaboration between Brook McIlroy Architects, Mohawk College, Aboriginal students of the College, and Elders and members of the several prominent indigenous communities and organizations. Related: Atelier Vecteur’s Timber Pavilion for the Festival of Lively Architecture is Not as Simple as it Looks The Hoop comprises four elements- an open air pavilion , a fire circle, a water garden and a traditional garden. It has two radiating and intersecting circles joined by a raised seating platform, which reference traditional construction techniques used in the Longhouse typology typical of northern Iroquoian communities. It will function as a space “that could be used to really infuse indigenous pedagogy into a western ways of teaching,” said Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, who recently unveiled the structure. + Brook McIlroy Photos via Brook McIlroy and Mohawk College

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Amazing Hoop Dance Gathering Place celebrates Canada’s indigenous cultures

Mercury pollution poison threatens to wipe out a remote tribe of indigenous Amazon people

March 14, 2016 by  
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Mercury poisoning could potentially wipe out an isolated Amazonian tribe in Peru . Over 80 percent of the members of the Nahua tribe are currently sick with mercury poisoning, which is linked to anemia and kidney malfunction, and one child has reportedly died from the illness, according to tribal protection group Survival International (SI). Health experts say that Camisea Gas Project , the country’s largest gas field, is the source of the poisoning. Read the rest of Mercury pollution poison threatens to wipe out a remote tribe of indigenous Amazon people

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Mercury pollution poison threatens to wipe out a remote tribe of indigenous Amazon people

This 130-square-foot modular Nomadic Shelter sleeps 12 people

March 10, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of This 130-square-foot modular Nomadic Shelter sleeps 12 people Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Arctic Circle , camping , fish rack , indigenous people , modular building , norway , salt , Salt Siida , Sandhornøy , shelter , tiny house

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This 130-square-foot modular Nomadic Shelter sleeps 12 people

Watch as Isolated Amazon Tribe Makes Contact With the Outside World for the First Time

August 4, 2014 by  
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In a rare event that few people have ever witnessed, a previously isolated tribe encountered the outside world for the first time – and the surprising moment was all caught on video. Several indigenous people emerged from deep inside the Amazon seeking help after their village suffered a deadly attack by probable drug traffickers. The armed tribesmen asked for weapons and allies, saying that their village had been massacred by non-indigenous people. The video encounter shows people offering the tribesmen food and attempting to communicate using enthusiastic gestures as two separate worlds collide. Read the rest of Watch as Isolated Amazon Tribe Makes Contact With the Outside World for the First Time Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Amazon drug trade , Amazon gas exploration , Amazon indigenous people , Amazon indigenous tribes , Amazon logging , Amazon oil exploration , Amazon tribes , Amazon uncontacted tribes , drug trafficking , Indian tribes , indigenous people , isolated Amazon tribes , Peru drug trade , protecting indigenous people , protecting indigenous tribes , South American drug trade , South American Indian tribes , uncontacted people

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Watch as Isolated Amazon Tribe Makes Contact With the Outside World for the First Time

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