Sustainable Innovation in the Textile Industry

September 16, 2020 by  
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Sustainable Innovation in the Textile Industry As global apparel consumption continues to rise—an expected increase of 60% by 2030—that growth could have a dangerous impact on the environment. Currently, 87% of textiles are landfilled or incinerated and 10% of GHG emissions come from fashion industry. As Earth’s resources become more and more constrained, the global fashion industry is looking toward innovative materials and strategies to reduce its environmental impact and carbon footprint. But bringing consumers and others in the apparel industry value chain along on the sustainability journey can be a challenge. Join Eastman and H&M for a webcast to learn about: Eastman’s recent launch of Naia™ Renew that addresses the need to have more sustainable fibers. Why H&M chose to use Naia™ Renew in their new clothing line How H&M is supporting these types of initiatives through accelerating the use of preferred materials across the global textile industry. Moderator: John Davies, Vice President, GreenBiz Speakers: To be announced soon… If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. taylor flores Wed, 09/16/2020 – 13:21 John Davies VP, Senior Analyst GreenBiz Group @greenbizjd gbz_webcast_date Tue, 10/13/2020 – 10:00 – Tue, 10/13/2020 – 11:00

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Sustainable Innovation in the Textile Industry

Reflecting and resetting on the 50th anniversary of Earth Day

April 22, 2020 by  
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COVID-19 is starkly illustrating how critical it is to reduce our impact on the planet and the urgent need to try harder to address societal inequalities.

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Reflecting and resetting on the 50th anniversary of Earth Day

Solar-powered home embraces tree canopy views in all directions

March 4, 2020 by  
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In the coastal township of Barwon Heads, Australian architecture firm Peter Winkler Architects has completed the Green Velvet House, a family’s solar-powered home that sensitively responds to the landscape in more ways than one. Positioned for passive solar design and to maximize views over the surrounding tree canopy, the sustainable dwelling was engineered to minimize impact on the existing terrain. In addition to walls of glass that let in natural light and ventilation, the home draws power from a rooftop solar array and minimizes its environmental footprint with rainwater collection tanks for irrigation and toilet-flushing. Nestled into an existing depression in the site, the Green Velvet House rises to a height of two stories with 580 square meters of living space. Its minimalist appearance — a facade of cement sheets and floor-to-ceiling glazing divided by exposed structural timbers — helps to reduce the building’s visual impact on the landscape. “In response to the program, we have minimized the building footprint by efficiently consolidating the form, rather than creating a sprawling building that overtakes the site,” the team explained. Related: Samurai-inspired home keeps naturally cool in Melbourne To keep the focus on the outdoors, the solar-powered home is surrounded by walls of glass and terraces that invite the owners outdoors on multiple floors. The outdoor spaces and the interiors are protected from unwanted solar gain by generous eaves and horizontal screens. The main living areas and the guest bedroom are located on the ground floor, while the upper floor is reserved for the more private areas, including the master suite and two children’s bedrooms. Plywood walls and a sealed fiber-cement ceiling reference the exterior materials and lend a sense of warmth to the interiors. Recycled “Grey Ironbark” hardwood columns and beams are also featured throughout the building. For energy efficiency, the Colorbond tray deck roof is fitted with a 10.26 kW photovoltaic system . The aluminum sliding doors are also outfitted with double glazing, while the double-hung, sashless windows can be opened for natural ventilation. Three 5,000-liter water tanks were installed beneath the north deck to store rainwater for garden use and toilet-flushing, while other stormwater runoff is retained in bioswales. The home is also equipped with hydronic heating, wood-burning fireplaces and a Sanden heat pump with a 315-liter water tank. + Peter Winkler Architects Photography by Jack Lovel via Peter Winkler Architects

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Solar-powered home embraces tree canopy views in all directions

The climate case for construction

January 2, 2020 by  
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Buildings have an outsize impact on the environment. But there are solutions to make construction more efficient, resilient and safer.

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The climate case for construction

The climate case for construction

January 2, 2020 by  
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Buildings have an outsize impact on the environment. But there are solutions to make construction more efficient, resilient and safer.

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The climate case for construction

24-year-old entrepreneur to launch plant-based "superprotein" products by vote

July 24, 2019 by  
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Food science labs around the world are aiming to take over the meat industry with alternative protein options, but a new competitor has entered the market: an ambitious and well-resourced 24-year-old entrepreneur named Kim Le. Le’s fledgling company, called Prime Roots, is planning to launch its alternative meat products in early 2020 and will add its items to shelves already occupied by major companies like Impossible Foods and Tyson . While alternative proteins do address the meat industry’s unsustainable impact on the environment, many of them rely on GMO and lab-grown methods to produce proteins. Prime Roots markets its products as sustainable, non-GMO, whole food-sourced “superproteins.” Related: Impossible Foods tests a fish-less fish protein Unlike most corporations, Prime Roots uses a unique, democratic process for selecting the three products that will be available in 2020. It invited its “community of eaters” to vote on the products via the company’s website . The website also boasts promo codes, giveaways and “ambassadors-only events” for potential consumers interested in taking a more active role in the company’s sustainability and promotional efforts . Months before the products are actually available, the website invites visitors to read-up about alternative proteins and “join the superprotein revolution.” Le, a recent UC Berkeley graduate, developed the idea for Prime Roots during her time in college. The daughter of famous Vietnamese chef Chi Le, Kim spent her whole life around food and went to university specifically to learn more about fermentation science. She got her start as an entrepreneur through UC Berkeley’s Alternative Meat Lab housed at the Sutardja Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology. Her company then began to grow and become a reality through support from IndieBio. Since then, Le has amassed over $4 million in investments through both True Ventures and the Collaborative Fund. Prime Roots products will include a meat-free chicken and bacon as well as seafood-less salmon and lobster. You can vote on the products you’d like to see on shelves first on the Prime Roots website . + Prime Roots Image via Prime Roots

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24-year-old entrepreneur to launch plant-based "superprotein" products by vote

Earth911 Quiz #60: New Tech and Materials Recycling

May 9, 2019 by  
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Daily, you make decisions that influence humanity’s impact on the … The post Earth911 Quiz #60: New Tech and Materials Recycling appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Quiz #60: New Tech and Materials Recycling

Looking for a Lifetime Roof

May 9, 2019 by  
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Everyone who cares about the environment wants their purchases to … The post Looking for a Lifetime Roof appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Looking for a Lifetime Roof

Greenland is melting four times faster than it was 15 years ago

January 24, 2019 by  
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A new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has found that Greenland is melting four times faster than it has in the past 15 years. Using data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), which were two satellites launched by Germany and NASA back in 2002, researchers discovered that between 2002 and 2016, Greenland lost 280 gigatons of ice every year, and that resulted in the addition of .03 inches of water annually to the world’s oceans. “We’re going to see faster and faster sea level rise for the foreseeable future,” study lead author and Ohio State University geodynamics professor Michael Bevis said in a press release . “Once you hit that tipping point, the only question is: How severe does it get?” Bevis explained that they knew there was a significant problem with the increasing rates of ice discharge from the large outlet glaciers. But what they didn’t expect was ice melt from Greenland’s southwest region. That area does not normally have breaking glaciers like the southeast and northwest, yet the southwest is where the most consistent ice loss happened between 2003 and 2012. Now, according to EcoWatch , researchers are recognizing that large amounts of ice mass are going to become a major contributor to the rise of sea levels over the next couple of decades. There was also a noticeable pause in melting back in 2013, at the same time that warm air was brought to Greenland by a reversal in North Atlantic Oscillation. Bevis said that is concerning, because in the past, the cycle of warm and cool temperatures didn’t have such a dramatic impact on the region. If the base-level temperature is so warm that the natural temperature cycles are accelerating the ice melting, then this could be a “tipping point.” However, the authors of another study from December 2018 cautioned using such language. They found that Greenland was melting at the fastest rate in more than three centuries, but that doesn’t mean we have passed “the point of no return,” according to the study authors. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute scientist Sarah B. Das said that there are still meaningful actions humans can take. If we limit greenhouse gas emissions, we can limit global warming . This will make a big difference in how quickly the ice melting in Greenland will affect the rise of sea levels. Via EcoWatch and OSU Image via Christine Zenino

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Greenland is melting four times faster than it was 15 years ago

This tiny home eschews minimalist design for vibrant colors and bold patterns

January 24, 2019 by  
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Most tiny homes tend to go for the standard “less is more” strategy when it comes to interior design. But one Texas designer, Galeana Younger from the Galeana Group , is breaking that mold with her stunning “maximalist” tiny home. Forgoing the typical neutral color palette, Younger decked out the 190-square-foot tiny home with a host of vibrant colors, funky patterns and plenty of personal touches that give the home a jubilant character. Recently, the designer told Lonny that she wanted the tiny home design to be full of fun. “I wanted to create an environment that would allow/encourage people to feel comfortable and happy but still slightly elevated and outside of themselves,” Younger said. “Like they were in a hip, urban locale that made them feel a little more chispa than usual.” Related: The off-grid Eucalyptus tiny home radiates cool, Californian vibes Accordingly, the bold interior design found throughout the home has quite a bit of “spark” from the moment you enter. The living space features a small wicker sofa covered with various pillows in an array of colors and textures. To the right, the bedroom is wallpapered in a lively black and white cactus print. Contrasting the busy pattern on the walls is the ceiling, which is painted a light ethereal blue. A triangle-patterned rug is on the floor, nicely connecting the black door and trim, which is found throughout the interior. Moving into the kitchen , the blast of fun, vibrant colors cannot be missed. The geometric backsplash is comprised of multiple hues and shades that add a sense of whimsy to the cooking area. Open shelving stores the home’s dishware along with decorative bottles in different shapes and colors. Further into the back of the space is the bathroom. Surprisingly spacious for a tiny home, this black and white motif still manages to be filled with personality. The shower stall was hand laid with the words, “Howdy, ya’ll.” Above the bathroom, a ladder leads to a compact sleeping loft . + The Galeana Group Via Curbed Photography by Mark Menjivar via The Galeana Group

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