Praying mantises wearing tiny glasses help researchers discover new type of 3D vision

February 12, 2018 by  
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This praying mantis isn’t just wearing minuscule 3D glasses for the cute factor, but to help scientists learn more about 3D vision. A Newcastle University team discovered a novel form of 3D vision, or stereo vision, in the insects – and compared human and insect stereo vision for the very first time. Their findings could have implications for visual processing in robots . Humans aren’t the only creatures with stereo vision, which “helps us work out the distances to the things we see,” according to the university . Cats, horses, monkeys, toads, and owls have it too – but the only insect we know about with 3D vision is the praying mantis. Six Newcastle University researchers obtained new insight into their robust stereo vision with the help of small 3D glasses temporarily attached to the insects with beeswax. Related: Praying mantises hunt down and eat small birds, including hummingbirds The researchers designed an insect 3D cinema, showing a praying mantis a film of prey. The insects would actually try to catch the prey because the illusion was so convincing. And the scientists were able to take their work to the next level, showing the mantises “complex dot-patterns used to investigate human 3D vision” so they could compare our 3D vision with an insect’s for the first time. According to the university, humans see 3D in still images by matching details of the image each eye sees. “But mantises only attack moving prey so their 3D doesn’t need to work in still images. The team found mantises don’t bother about the details of the picture but just look for places where the picture is changing…Even if the scientists made the two eyes’ images completely different, mantises can still match up the places where things are changing. They did so even when humans couldn’t.” The journal Current Biology published their work online last week . Lead author Vivek Nityananda, a behavioral ecologist, described the praying mantis’ stereo vision as “a completely new form of 3D vision.” Future robots could benefit from these findings: instead of 3D vision based on complex human stereo vision, researchers might be able to take some tips from praying mantis stereo vision, which team member Ghaith Tarawneh said probably doesn’t require a lot of computer processing since insect brains are so small. + Newcastle University + Current Biology Images via Newcastle University, UK/Phys.org

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Praying mantises wearing tiny glasses help researchers discover new type of 3D vision

LEGO Hand Bag turns you into a minifigsorta

October 19, 2016 by  
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The rectangular paper bag is like regular shopping bags in many respects. It’s just the right size for hauling your LEGO store loot, and sturdy enough to stand up on its own. Inside the bag are two handles, placed on opposite long sides of the bag. However, that’s where the similarities end, because the LEGO Hand Bag has one additional amusing feature. Related: LEGO releases set with stay-at-home dad and working mom minifigures When a person is holding the bag by its built-in handles, their (human) hands are covered up by bright yellow plastic hands resembling those of a LEGO minifigure . While the illusion works best when the customer is wearing a long-sleeved shirt or jacket, the promotional bag can make anyone look like they belong in LEGOland or, at the very least, like an extra from the LEGO movie. The kooky bag has been making its way around the internet for the past several days, but there’s still no word of an official response from the folks at LEGO HQ. Surely, they’ve seen it by now, so we can only hope they are deep in discussions over what kind of check to cut for the design duo who created what LEGO’s own advertising department didn’t think to attempt. Via Junho Lee and Hyun Chul Choi Images via Hyun Chul Choi and LEGO

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LEGO Hand Bag turns you into a minifigsorta

Shipping container is converted into a chic portable boutique shop in Toronto

August 16, 2016 by  
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Needs & Wants Studio sourced the container from the Canadian supplier Storstac and, following designs they created last fall, painted the facade white and lined the interior with light-colored wood. To give the small 160-square-foot shipping container a sense of spaciousness, the mobile boutique created entrances on both ends that are kept open to expand the showroom’s footprint to the outdoors. Mirrored, one-way glazing was also inserted into two large square cutouts on the long walls. Related: Australia’s Largest Cargotecture House is a Modern Masterpiece Built from 31 Shipping Containers The interior is minimally decorated and a large mirror propped against one wall helps with the illusion of spaciousness. Needs & Wants Studio’s clothing line, which focuses on upscale mens outerwear, is elegantly displayed on metal racks. The herringbone -patterned floor and uneven timber paneling on the walls and ceiling give the space texture to keep it from looking dull. In addition to the mobile boutique’s scheduled tour, the Toronto brand has plans to create a second portable showroom that will be “designed for water.” + Needs & Wants Studio Via Dezeen Images via Needs & Wants Studio

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Shipping container is converted into a chic portable boutique shop in Toronto

Ekaterinensky Congress Center glows like a lantern on the Kuban River in Russia

July 29, 2016 by  
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The building combines orthogonal and curved surfaces with a glass curtain facade that follows the sinuous plan of the building volume oriented towards the river. At night, the curved glass windows and a large brise-soleil in oxidized copper create an appearance of a lantern visible all along the river bank. Related: ‘Kinetic’ rooftop garden uses pallets and plants to create the illusion of movement Programmatically, the building is divided into two areas, along with outside spaces and roof terraces . The entire building is slightly elevated above street level, allowing the architects to create two underground floors with a parking space, technical rooms and service areas. The large, triple-height entrance dominates the building. Thanks to the presence of movable, soundproof walls, the main conference hall can be split into a 720-seat plenary hall, 3 parallel 200-seat halls and 6 small 60-seat halls. + Piuarch

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Ekaterinensky Congress Center glows like a lantern on the Kuban River in Russia

‘Limits’ coffee table plays with distortion and spatial limits

April 7, 2016 by  
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Geometric shapes come together to form a smooth design that plays with space and function. Called Limits, the idea is “a compact table that pushes our perception of physical and philosophical boundaries,” states Singaporean designer, Kimberly Koh. Created entirely from wooden flat triangles, the joints have been smoothed over, giving the illusion of weightlessness and a sleek composition. Tapered joints and contrasting wood tones maintain the contrast between the various triangular planes, which therefore appear independent from one another. The absence of any vertical edges distorts the sense of perspective, thus distorting the ‘spatial limits’ of the table. The projecting, cantilevered design establishes a sense of imbalance, which suggests that the center of gravity will shift when items are placed on top of it. The middle compartment is removable, creating a more flexible design for users, who can mold the table to suit their creative and practical needs. + Florence Institute The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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‘Limits’ coffee table plays with distortion and spatial limits

Formabilio’s Duale Double-Faced Dining Table Can Change the Character of a Room With a Simple Move

October 29, 2014 by  
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Italian eco-friendly furniture brand Formabilio launched Duale, a double-faced wood and metal dining table designed by Luca Binaglia . Created to accommodate up to eight people, the contemporary and versatile table offers users the choice between the elegant simplicity of a veneered oak surface or a bolder and more intense colorful surface on the opposite side. To create the illusion of weightlessness, Binaglia set the two-faced tabletop on a curved tubular steel structure to give the table a distinctive geometric silhouette. + Formabilio + Luca Binaglia The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green furniture” , dining table , double faced table , Duale , Formabilio , Luca Binaglia , oak surface , oak table , reader submitted content , table , tubular steel

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Formabilio’s Duale Double-Faced Dining Table Can Change the Character of a Room With a Simple Move

MIT Creates Cheap New Full-Color Hologram Technology

June 21, 2013 by  
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Full-color holograms were once just an imaginary mode of communication between rebel princesses and venerated Jedi masters. Daniel Smalley, a graduate student at MIT , has made the technology a reality with a new method that creates displays that are vibrant, detailed, and inexpensive. The resolution of his prototype is equivalent to that of a standard TV . Able to refresh images 30 times a second, his invention can simulate the illusion of movement. The device relies upon a small chip that resembles a microscope slide that Smalley was able to fabricate for only $10 in the MIT labs. Read the rest of MIT Creates Cheap New Full-Color Hologram Technology Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: acousto-optic modulation , daniel smalley , diffraction fringe , full color , hologram , lithium niobate , MIT , pixel , waveguide        

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MIT Creates Cheap New Full-Color Hologram Technology

Get Tanked: Fabulous Faux Swimming Pool Illusions

May 3, 2011 by  
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[ By Delana in Art & Design & Technology & Gadgets & Tricks & Hacks . ] There are few things more delightful than a dip in a cool pool on a hot summer day – but there is definitely something different about these swimming pools.

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Get Tanked: Fabulous Faux Swimming Pool Illusions

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