Antarctica loses record amount of ice

July 3, 2019 by  
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A new study using satellite images of Antarctica reveals a remarkable spike in ice melt over the last five years. Although the extent of the ice was expanding since 1974, after 2014, Antarctica lost nearly 810,815 square miles of ice. Scientists aren’t ready to point their fingers at climate change as the culprit, but regardless of what is to blame, the loss in ice has an enormous impact on the South Pole’s ecosystem. “It went from its 40-year high in 2014, all the way down in 2017 to its 40-year low,” said the author of the study , climatologist Claire Parkinson. There was a similar massive retreat of ice in the 1970s, which is why researchers aren’t sure if this is due to global warming — and if it is permanent. Despite the overall loss in ice over the past five years, there was some growth in 2017; scientists are hopeful that this could be part of the relatively normal cycling of ice. Related: NASA finds cavity the size of Manhattan underneath Antarctic glacier Regardless of what caused it and whether or not it is gone forever, the loss in ice is bad news for local species and for global warming in the rest of the world. “Sea ice also affects the polar ecosystem, including penguins and whales and seals, petrels and albatrosses, krill, and a whole range of additional animals and marine plant life,” Parkinson said. In addition, ice reflects about 50 to 70 percent of the sun’s rays back out into space, which helps keep the Earth’s surface cool. By comparison, EcoWatch reported that the dark blue ocean absorbs 90 percent of light. “The plunge in the average annual extent means Antarctica lost as much sea ice in four years as the Arctic lost in 34 years,” tweeted a concerned Greta Thunberg. Via EcoWatch Image via John B. Weller / The Pew Charitable Trusts / U.S. Department of State

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Antarctica loses record amount of ice

This rustic tiny home on wheels spans just 90 square feet

July 3, 2019 by  
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When it comes to tiny home design, sometimes it’s the itsy-bitsy spaces that show us how to live big. The Vancouver-based designers at Backcountry Tiny Homes have proved just that with a gorgeous tiny home on wheels that measures merely 16 feet long. Although incredibly compact, savvy design strategies, including oversized windows and a charming front porch, give The Acorn a certain character that overcomes its small stature. The Acorn tiny house, part of the company’s Mountain Series, is designed for the adventurer in us all. Perfect for either a weekend cabin in the mountains or an off-grid home near the beach, this tiny home is a great fit for just about any lifestyle. Related: Basecamp tiny home boasts a large rooftop deck for mountain-climbing couple and 3 dogs The tiny home ‘s exterior is clad in a honey-toned knotty cedar with a bit of black metal siding. A charming front porch gives the residence a welcoming vibe. The cabin’s interior is just 90 square feet but manages to pack a lot of punch into the space. A major factor in its sophisticated design is the multiple oversized windows that let in ample natural light and connect the living space with the outdoors. Adding to the rustic charm is the wooden interior with Alpine Backwoods flooring and tongue and groove spruce paneling on the walls. The home boasts a small living room with a comfy sofa that folds out into a queen-sized mattress. On the opposite wall, a small table that can be used for dining or working folds up when it is not in use. High up on the walls, just under the ceiling, is a wrap-around shelf for storage . Additional storage is found in the nooks and crannies throughout the home. The bathroom is more than big enough for such a small space and comes with a full-sized shower, toilet and a vanity cabinet. The kitchen is a tight squeeze but offers all of the basic amenities as well as one major surprise. Hooked up to the kitchen is a built-in Sweepovac vacuum system that is the perfect amenity for keeping the tiny space tidy. According to the designers, the Acorn comes with tight insulation that makes it feasible for almost any climate. Additionally, the tiny home can be custom-designed with additional features such as off-grid capabilities . + Backcountry Tiny Homes Via Tiny House Talk Images via Backcountry Tiny Homes

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This rustic tiny home on wheels spans just 90 square feet

Heatwave roasts mussels alive in California

July 3, 2019 by  
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An unusual heatwave sent droves of Californians to the beach, where they were met with hundreds of unfamiliar beach-goers – cooked mussels. Consecutive days of high temperatures caused a widespread die-off of mussels along Northern California’s Bodega Bay, a marine reserve and fishing community. Ecologists reported similar die-of scenarios throughout a 140 mile stretch of coastline. Although there was a similar die-off of mussels in 2004, this appears to be the largest in 15 years. With low-tide temperatures reaching up to 100 degrees Fahrenheit, the mussels were roasted right in their shells and washed up on the beaches fully cooked. Related: Trash collecting device returned to Pacific garbage patch Scientists worry that although they can see the damage to the mussel population by walking along the shore, there could be other widespread damage to other species and ecosystems below the water and out of eyesight, as mussels are a critical species within their ecosystem. “Mussels are known as a foundation species . The equivalent are the trees in a forest– they provide shelter and habitat for a lot of animals, so when you impact that core habitat it ripples throughout the rest of the system,” said marine research coordinator, Jackie Sones. “These events are definitely becoming more frequent, and more severe. Mussels are one of the canaries in the coal mine for climate change, only this canary provides food and habitat for hundreds of other species,” said Christopher Harley, a biologist at the University of British Columbia. Much research about rising sea levels and temperatures focuses on nearshore tropical ecosystems, where coral reefs are sensitive to even the slightest shifts in temperature or acidity. Less research exists for cooler coastlines and open waters such as Northern California, but the mussel die-off is evidence that the negative impacts of climate change have already reached these waters. Via The Guardian Image via joycemay

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Greenland ice sheet is melting faster and earlier in the year than ever

April 13, 2016 by  
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Climate scientists are beside themselves this month as record-breaking ice melt in Greenland devastates the nation’s ice sheet. New measurements from the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) estimate there is melting over 12 percent of Greenland ’s ice sheet. That amount is considerably higher than previous records, and the melt is occurring much earlier this year than normal, leaving scientists with lots of concerns about the future. Read the rest of Greenland ice sheet is melting faster and earlier in the year than ever

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Greenland ice sheet is melting faster and earlier in the year than ever

James Hansen warns dangerous effects of climate change could hit much sooner than we think

March 23, 2016 by  
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Last year a working paper led by retired NASA scientist James Hansen incited controversy , and now, the final version of the research is stirring debate once again. In the paper, Hansen and other international scientists warn that the 2°C Paris limit could still cause irreparable damage to our planet, specifically through polar ice melts , superstorms , and rising sea levels that could demolish coastal cities. And those effects could be felt within decades, not centuries. Read the rest of James Hansen warns dangerous effects of climate change could hit much sooner than we think

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James Hansen warns dangerous effects of climate change could hit much sooner than we think

Record high air and water temperatures in the Arctic are threatening walrus and fish at an alarming rate

December 17, 2015 by  
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The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported Tuesday that the Arctic is “warming twice as fast as other parts of the planet.” Arctic temperatures hit a record high this year , more than 2 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than average, with some areas seeing a 2 degree increase over average temps. Scientists say the higher temperatures are drastically changing the habitat of marine life, like walruses, who rely on the sea ice for survival. The melting ice also contributes to rising sea levels around the globe, posing an increased threat to low-lying coastal regions. Logically, warmer air and water temperatures lead to increased ice melting, sending ever more fresh water into the oceans. The NOAA report indicates the largest warming trend is occurring in Chukchi Sea, northwest of Alaska, and Baffin Bay, off the west coast of Greenland. Scientists say Greenland has experienced “extensive” melting over 50 percent of its ice sheet, which leaves ocean water vulnerable to the sun’s rays, resulting in warmer water temperatures. Less ice and warming ocean water pose a threat to the entire ecosystem, with negative impacts on everything from weather to marine life. Related: Greenland’s ice is melting faster than previously thought In particular, NOAA scientists are concerned about fish and walruses. “The decline in sea ice is dramatically changing the habitat for walruses,” the report states, largely because the mammals “traditionally use sea ice for mating, giving birth to young, finding food and shelter from storms and predators.” With less territory to support their livelihoods, walrus are moving to new locales in large numbers. Recently, an estimated 35,000 walruses hauled out (the term for walruses coming out of the water) on a barrier island near Point Lay, Alaska, and other large groups have been spotted through aerial surveys. The large-scale haul outs are problematic to walrus survival, as the overcrowding leads to stampedes that kill calves and increase competition for limited food resources. Via Al Jazeera America and NOAA Images via Corey Accardo, NOAA/NMFS and Dan Pisut, NOAA/Climate.gov

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Record high air and water temperatures in the Arctic are threatening walrus and fish at an alarming rate

NASA satellite shows this glacier just lost the biggest chunk of ice ever recorded

August 27, 2015 by  
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NASA satellites are pretty nifty, in large part because they capture world events that we might not know about otherwise. That’s what happened recently, when NASA’s Landsat 8 recorded the image above on August 16 of Greenland’s Jakobshavn glacier, which is one of the world’s largest and fastest melting, which. When researchers compared recent images to images captured two weeks ago, they discovered that  the glacier just lost an enormous chunk of ice . So big, in fact, that it may be the largest chunk of ice loss ever recorded. Read the rest of NASA satellite shows this glacier just lost the biggest chunk of ice ever recorded

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NASA satellite shows this glacier just lost the biggest chunk of ice ever recorded

Greenland’s ice is melting faster than previously thought

December 17, 2014 by  
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The rate of melting ice from Greenland’s ice sheet might be vastly underestimated according to a new study released Monday in Nature Climate Change . Data from satellites led the study to conclude that Greenland is likely to develop more lakes “that speed up melt,” which would add as much as 20 feet to sea levels. Read the rest of Greenland’s ice is melting faster than previously thought Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: antarctic ice sheet , arctic climate , Arctic warming , Climate Change , climate change global warming , global warming , greenland , greenland ice sheet , ice melt , ice sheet

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Greenland’s ice is melting faster than previously thought

Antarctica’s Ice Loss is Significant Enough to Affect Earth’s Gravity

October 3, 2014 by  
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Scientists from the European Space Agency recently discovered that the loss of ice in Antarctica is so significant that it’s affecting the Earth’s gravity. The researchers paired data from the ESA’s GOCE satellite with data from the GRACE system of satellites and found that the Earth’s gravity dipped in the area because the ice lost so much mass. Read the rest of Antarctica’s Ice Loss is Significant Enough to Affect Earth’s Gravity Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Antarctic , antarctica , cryosat , european space agency , glacial melt , GOCE , grace , gravity , ice melt , Melting ice in Antarctica affecting Earth’s gravity , nasa , polar ice melt , west antarctic ice sheet

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Antarctica’s Ice Loss is Significant Enough to Affect Earth’s Gravity

How Global Warming Can Cause Heavier Snowfalls

January 23, 2014 by  
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Residents living in the northeast quarter of the US and parts of Canada have been blasted by a rash of cold weather recently – and it turns out global warming could be behind it . Chris Mooney, host of the Climate Desk , put together an informative report on exactly how global warming could lead to more frequent, heavy snow storms . Read the rest of How Global Warming Can Cause Heavier Snowfalls Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: blizzards , Chris Mooney , Climate Change , Climate Desk , extreme weather , global warming , ice melt , polar vortex , severe weather , severe winters , snow , Snowmageddon , snowstorms , snowy weather , warming atmosphere , warming earth , warming oceans , weather        

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How Global Warming Can Cause Heavier Snowfalls

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