Halo Top debuts new and improved vegan ice cream recipe

September 15, 2020 by  
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Vegans often face limited options for frozen treats. Sure, you can put a banana in the freezer, get a little fancier with a sorbet or maybe cool off with some vegan frozen yogurt. But now, thanks to Halo Top’s new line of vegan ice cream flavors, consumers can enjoy a range of choices with the creamy texture that makes ice cream summer’s perfect treat. Halo Top has offered vegan ice cream for years. The company’s new line features an improved taste and texture that feels more like real ice cream. Starting with a coconut milk base, the recipe also contains fava bean protein, which gives the ice cream a creamy texture. Previously, Halo Top used brown rice protein in its vegan ice cream creations. The switch to fava bean protein lends the ice cream a better texture that allows every flavor to stand out. Halo Top also swapped out the soluble corn fiber in its old recipe for inulin. Stevia provides the recipe with sweetness. Halo Top’s line of dairy-free ice cream introduces several flavors, including sea salt caramel. This mix of sweet and salty comes in at under 340 calories per pint. The flavor line also includes peanut butter cup, chocolate almond crunch, chocolate chip cookie dough, classic chocolate, candy bar and birthday cake. Each flavor’s calorie count stands between 280 to 380 calories per pint. The fava bean protein provides every pint with 10 to 20 grams of protein. The flavors will debut in grocery stores in September and October, in two different release waves. This line is exactly what vegans have been waiting for: ice cream that tastes like the real thing. Even better, this line includes a variety of flavors packed with protein, but not calories. Get your spoons ready and prepare to enjoy this new plant-based offering from Halo Top. + Halo Top Via Plant Based News Image via PR Newswire

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Halo Top debuts new and improved vegan ice cream recipe

Easy vegan ice cream recipes to enjoy all summer long

June 2, 2020 by  
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With summer just around the corner, now is the perfect time to experiment with frozen treats, particularly some delicious and refreshing vegan ice cream. Not sure where to start? Here are four vegan ice cream recipes you can make right in your kitchen — no ice cream maker or hard-to-find ingredients required. Banana-based vegan ice cream The absolute simplest — and healthiest — vegan ice cream recipe requires just two ingredients: bananas and cocoa powder. This sounds a little far-fetched, but it really works to make a convincing ice cream consistency. Related: Should you make sourdough starter? The recipe from Bowl of Delicious gives the important instruction to slice the bananas first so they don’t break the blades in your food processor or blender. While the recipe says to freeze your banana slices on a parchment covered baking sheet, if you don’t have parchment, you can just put a layer of banana slices in a container to freeze. Once the banana slices are frozen, it’s time to make ice cream. The original recipe recommends using a food processor, but a blender should do the trick. If it seems to be having some trouble, add a little non-dairy milk to help the process along. From there, add the cocoa powder and blend until the dessert has a smooth texture. Sure, it’s not Ben and Jerry’s, but it is more satisfying as a dessert than you would expect. This recipe is your best bet if you want a healthful, low-fat, no-churn vegan ice cream without added sugar. You could jazz it up by adding some nut butter, jam or cinnamon. Tahini-chocolate vegan ice cream This recipe from Strength and Sunshine suits both vegan and paleo diets. The ice cream is made using only four ingredients: coconut , tahini, cocoa powder and erythritol. Erythritol is a no-calorie sugar substitute, which, according to WebMD , appears to be safe for people with diabetes. I used sugar instead, as I already had that in the pantry, and added cinnamon and a dash of cayenne for a spicy chocolate flavor. This one is super easy to make in the blender. I didn’t blend the ingredients nearly as long as the recipe instructed — 3 minutes for the coconut milk alone, 5 more minutes for all the ingredients together — because it was sufficiently blended far sooner than that. I poured the mixture into a wax paper-lined loaf pan as the recipe suggested, then covered it with foil. Unfortunately, pieces of the wax paper tore off and stuck to the ice cream as I scooped it, so in the future, I will pour the ice cream directly into the pan. Less waste, less problems! The chocolate tahini vegan ice cream was my favorite of the four recipes. The tahini gives a slightly bitter flavor, so if you want something sweeter, you could add a little more sugar (or erythritol). Avocado-lime vegan ice cream Courtesy of Delish , this is another unique vegan ice cream recipe. Avocado-lime ice cream is simple to make. Just put your avocados, coconut cream, lime juice and other ingredients in the blender, and you’ll soon have a very green substance to freeze in a loaf pan or other freezer-safe container. In case you’re wondering what the difference is between coconut milk and cream, the cream is much richer. It’s made by simmering four parts coconut in one part water, making it high-calorie and very high in saturated fat. I used sugar because I didn’t have maple syrup on hand, and the flavor still turned out great. Allow at least 5 hours for your avocado lime ice cream to freeze. It becomes a lovely green color with a bold lime taste. Sweet potato-gingerbread vegan ice cream This vegan ice cream recipe from Food and Wine is a good balance between the healthful banana-based ice cream and the other more indulgent options with coconut cream. Sweet potato forms the base for this gingerbread-flavored ice cream. It takes only one-half of a cup of coconut milk, plus a frozen banana, a couple of tablespoons of nut butter and a lot of spices. Dates sweeten the mixture. The main work here involves prepping the sweet potato. The recipe calls for steaming the sweet potato, mashing it up, then freezing it in ice cube trays. However, these blocks of frozen sweet potato can prove to be a real challenge for some blenders. Be prepared to add more coconut milk or other vegan milk to help break down the frozen sweet potatoes. This one tastes pretty good, but the texture is not totally convincing as ice cream. It needs a lot of blending to avoid rather unpleasant little chunks of sweet potato. Also, it might taste better with more sweetener, or maybe regular sugar, maple syrup or agave instead of dates. If I make this again, I might experiment with blending the mashed sweet potatoes directly with the other ingredients, then freezing the entire mixture. It would also be easier on the blender blades if you made smaller frozen sweet potato cubes by only filling the ice trays halfway. More vegan ice cream recipes The internet has plenty more vegan ice cream recipes to try. Here are a few more that sound promising: date-sweetened, five-ingredient chocolate vegan ice cream from Minimalist Baker ; raspberry delight from Food and Wine ; almond butter-based ice cream from Unconventional Baker ; and cinnamon roll ice cream from Blissful Basil . Enjoy! Images via Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat

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Easy vegan ice cream recipes to enjoy all summer long

Horseshoe crab blood remains industry standard for big pharma

June 2, 2020 by  
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It’s a bad week for horseshoe crabs as their defenders have failed to convince big pharma that synthetic crab blood is a viable alternative for endotoxin testing in drugs. Maryland-based US Pharmacopeia (USP) has blocked this effort. Real horseshoe crabs’ copper-rich blue blood clots when it comes into contact with bacterial endotoxins — which, if present in products, can cause severe diarrhea and even toxic hemorrhagic shock. Since partially replacing rabbit tests in 1977, horseshoe crabs’ blood has been the industry standard. Animal rights groups and Switzerland-based Lonza have pushed for synthetic versions called recombinant Factor C (rFC). Related: Pacific Ocean’s elevated acidity is dissolving Dungeness crabs’ shells At first, experts thought USP, which produces influential drug industry publications, would add rFC to its chapter on international endotoxin testing standards. Instead, the organization decided to give rFC its own chapter. This means that even if a company wants to use rFC, it will still have to do additional testing with real horseshoe crab blood to validate results, which ultimately defeats the purpose. “Given the importance of endotoxin testing in protecting patients … the committee ultimately decided more real-world data [was needed],” USP said in a statement. USP said it supports shifting to rFC where possible, potentially including testing COVID-19 vaccines or medicines. Some drug companies are already using the synthetic tests to improve human health . Eli Lilly uses rFC for testing Emgality, a migraine treatment. Unlike most lab animals, the horseshoe crabs are captured, bled and released. John Dubczak, director of operations at Charles River Laboratories, told Scientific American that no more than 30% of a crab’s blood is removed and claimed a mortality rate of 4%. “One of my suppliers built a water slide to put the crabs back into the water,” Dubczak told Scientific American . “They love it!” Conservationists suspect the mortality rate is much higher for the industry as a whole. “There’s not very good science-based information on the mortality of the crabs,” Michael De Luca, senior associate director at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University, said in the same article. “I’ve see figures range from 15% to 40% but nobody has a really good handle on that.” Via The Guardian , Scientific American and Horseshoe Crab Image via Chris Engel

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Horseshoe crab blood remains industry standard for big pharma

Nissan unveils a solar-powered, zero-emissions ice cream van

June 25, 2019 by  
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To celebrate the U.K.’s Clean Air Day, Nissan has unveiled an impressive electric ice cream van that generates zero emissions while serving up a variety of cool and refreshing ice cream flavors on the go. The van is a fully electric vehicle installed with two Nissan Energy ROAM power packs and rooftop solar panels in order to power the van as well as the on-board equipment that helps keep the scrumptious ice cream nice and cold. There’s nothing like a cold ice cream cone to help cool off on a hot summer’s day. But the problem with most conventional ice cream trucks is that they still run on harmful diesel fuel. Additionally, many older truck models must keep the engines running to power the ice cream freezers, emitting harmful carbon dioxide emissions with each scoop, all day long. Related: Pizza Hut unveils a zero-emissions delivery truck that makes pizzas on the go Now, with its new design for a zero-emissions prototype, Nissan is hoping to revolutionize the mobile ice cream sector by providing an alternative for vendors looking to reduce their carbon footprint . Based on the e-NV200, Nissan’s 100 percent electric LCV model, the prototype was built using lithium-ion cells recovered from first-generation Nissan electric vehicles . The van’s motor runs on a 40kWh battery, while the ice cream equipment is powered by Nissan’s portable power pack, ROAM. To bring its dream of creating an entirely sustainable ice cream truck to fruition, Nissan partnered with Scottish ice cream maker, Mackie’s — a company that uses wind and solar power to make its delicious ice creams. As a result, not only is Nissan able to provide a better, more eco-friendly way of selling ice cream, but it is also able to provide a fully eco-friendly system, meaning that the ice cream is green from “sky to scoop.” + Nissan Images via Nissan

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Nissan unveils a solar-powered, zero-emissions ice cream van

Ben & Jerry’s backs onshore wind farms with gusty ice cream names

June 13, 2018 by  
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Cherry Gale-cia, anyone? How about some Strawberry Breeze-cake or Caramel Blew Blew? Ice cream company Ben & Jerry’s  has tweaked the names of some popular flavors with a gusty twist to rally support for onshore wind power in the United Kingdom, The Guardian reported . The company isn’t just changing flavor names, though; it’s also promoting a petition requesting that the government reconsider its opposition to onshore wind. Would you be surprised to hear that the vast majority of Brits support onshore wind? New government figures show 76% of us love it! Find out more & join us by signing the petition! https://t.co/5oANc1YOrL #windpower pic.twitter.com/5UtCUpyEg4 — Ben & Jerry's UK (@benandjerrysUK) June 13, 2018 76 percent of Brits support onshore wind farms , according to the findings of a UK government poll released in April. Despite that, construction on the farms has mostly ceased since the government stopped subsidies and put planning reforms in place. Ben & Jerry’s is supporting 10:10 Climate Action ‘s Blown Away campaign; the group’s petition calls on Minister for Housing, Communities, and Local Government James Brokenshire to remove additional planning requirements introduced in 2015, with the ultimate goal of unlocking onshore wind power in England. Over 26,000 people have signed the petition — you can sign it on 10:10’s website . The #UK needs onshore #windpower ! 25965 people have already signed the petition. Join us! https://t.co/Wf98ZlujDF pic.twitter.com/u1qPWviyhV — Ben & Jerry's UK (@benandjerrysUK) June 9, 2018 Related: Ben & Jerry’s launches vegan ice cream flavors Ben & Jerry’s, owned by Unilever, will sell renamed flavors at half price on what they’re calling windy Wednesdays. UK social mission manager Rebecca Baron told The Guardian, “If we want to move away from polluting fossil fuels and build a future based on clean energy , then wind power is a vital ingredient.” People could save around £1.6 billion, or $2.1 billion, on household power bills between 2019 and 2025 with new onshore wind, according to a report  from renewable energy consultants BVG Associates . This isn’t the first time Ben & Jerry’s has gotten involved in environmental or social issues; they launched a new flavor for climate action in 2015. They describe backing 10:10’s Blown Away campaign as the latest installment in their ongoing climate activism . + 10:10 Blown Away + 10:10 Climate Action Petition Via The Guardian Images courtesy of Ben & Jerry’s

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Ben & Jerry’s backs onshore wind farms with gusty ice cream names

Exit Interview: Andrea Asch, Ben & Jerry’s

April 2, 2018 by  
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The inside scoop on the iconic ice cream company’s sustainability journey from a 26-year veteran.

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Exit Interview: Andrea Asch, Ben & Jerry’s

Spiky sweets shop makes extraordinary use of the common traffic stopper

June 23, 2017 by  
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This new ice cream shop in Pozna?, Poland is a treat for the stomach—and the eyes. Clad in nearly a thousand white traffic cones, this spiky mobile shop for LODOVNIA is the creative work of local studio mode:lina architects . The eye-catching facade shows off an extraordinary use of an ordinary object, and references the conical shape of the ice cream cone. Completed this month, the LODOVNIA ice cream shop is a 35-square-meter building currently docked in the heart of Pozna?’s Stary Browar. Its sculptural facade is a response to the shop’s central location in the Courtyard of Art and LODOVNIA’s signature product: ice cream served in a cone. Nearly one thousand white traffic cones protrude out of the shop’s facade in five directions, giving it a whimsical and prickly appearance. Large glazed panels allow passersby to peek into the shop and also reflect Stary Browar’s surrounding architecture. In contrast to the white cones, the rest of the facade is painted black. Related: Hedgehog Concert Pavilion Makes Traffic Cones Beautiful “The interior is a black and white composition as well, warmed by triangle-shaped elements made of natural plywood,” wrote mode:lina. “Both the triangles and the shape of a sport cone further connect with the letter V in LODOVNIA’s logo, which makes the architectural result consistent with the ice cream shop’s visual identity system.” + mode:lina Images by Patryk Lewin?ski

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Spiky sweets shop makes extraordinary use of the common traffic stopper

Cleverly layered compact dirt walls mimic ice cream cakes in this Tokyo patisserie

June 21, 2017 by  
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Dirt may seem an odd material choice for an upscale patisserie in Tokyo , but design studio nendo playfully pulls it off with style. The Japanese designers layered compacted soils of varying colors to mimic the layers of an ice cream cake. The earth walls lend the “à tes souhaits!” shop a sense of warmth and contrast beautifully with the glass-and-steel facade. Located in the trendy Kichijoji neighborhood in Tokyo, à tes souhaits! is a small and elegant shop specializing in ice cream and chocolates . The earth walls comprise stacked soils of varying shades arranged in a staggered pattern to look like cut slices of ice cream cake with different flavors. “The wall guides people into the shop by the soft curvature from the outer wall, and then creates a gentle all-enveloping effect, like melted ice cream, all the way into the back of the shop,” writes nendo. “This created a relaxing ambience, taking advantage of the compactness of the space.” Related: Ancient Japanese tombs inspire nendo’s first public space design Since the new patisserie is the second location of à tes souhaits!, Nendo wanted to differentiate the two shops. The flagship uses bright lighting with mostly white surfaces and hard materials like marble and metal. In contrast, the new location uses a subdued color palette and softer lighting to complement the dominant use of wood and soil . + Nendo Images by Takumi Ota

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Cleverly layered compact dirt walls mimic ice cream cakes in this Tokyo patisserie

Ben & Jerry’s aims to fight climate change using the ultimate weapon – ice cream

June 2, 2015 by  
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Can ice cream save the world? For Vermont ice cream makers Ben & Jerry’s, the answer is a resounding “yes”. Their new flavor, Save Our Swirled, is sending out an SOS to Ben & Jerry’s fans around the world to take action on climate change . The brand is encouraging fans to sign an Avaaz petition calling for world leaders to take a serious stance on the climate at the UN Climate Summit in Paris this year. “Our goal is for international leaders to work towards 100 percent Clean Energy by 2050,” the Ben & Jerry’s website says. Read the rest of Ben & Jerry’s aims to fight climate change using the ultimate weapon – ice cream Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Avaaz , Ben & Jerry’s , climate action , Climate Change , climate petition , global warming , Ice Cream , tesla , tesla model-s , UN Climate Summit 2015 , UN Climate Summit Paris

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Ben & Jerry’s aims to fight climate change using the ultimate weapon – ice cream

Man Creates £140 a Scoop Glow-in-the-Dark Ice Cream Using Synthesized Jellyfish Luminescence

November 4, 2013 by  
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Fed up with the likes of vanilla, chocolate and strawberry ice cream? An experimental entrepreneur from Bristol (in the UK) has developed a whole range of uniquely flavored ice-cream  for adventurous palates looking to buck the norm. Among his range of flavors include cheddar cheese and roast beer, however it is his ‘glow-in-the-dark’ ice cream that has really raised eyebrows. Read the rest of Man Creates £140 a Scoop Glow-in-the-Dark Ice Cream Using Synthesized Jellyfish Luminescence Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bioluminescence , bristol , flavoured ice cream , glow in the dark ice cream , Ice Cream , jellyfish , Lick Me I’m Delicious , synthesised jellyfish luminescence        

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Man Creates £140 a Scoop Glow-in-the-Dark Ice Cream Using Synthesized Jellyfish Luminescence

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