This high-tech LED lighting could grow veggies in space

January 22, 2019 by  
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Move over, freeze-dried foods and Tang. The astronauts of tomorrow may be growing veggies in their spacecraft or even on the moon and Mars. OSRAM , a global high-tech lighting company, showed off its PHYTOFY horticultural lighting system at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES) . PHYTOFY RL uses LED lights that can be tuned, controlled and scheduled for different research applications. NASA is experimenting with PHYTOFY at the Kennedy Space Center to create plant recipes, which could eventually be used at the international space station. “While space is limited on spacecraft, NASA hopes to eventually scale up to larger growing areas, such as the lunar surface, the Martian surface or even during space transit,” said Steve Graves, strategic program manager for urban and digital farming. Related: Can vertical farming feed the world and change the agriculture industry? The PHYTOFY system includes an electric light unit, control gear and software. “The ability to control and schedule spectra, dosing plants photon by photon, is extremely innovative, especially when put into the hands of plants scientists,” Graves said. Despite the allure of space, OSRAM isn’t giving up on this planet. The plantCube is an Earth-based example of horticultural tech in OSRAM’s CES 2019 display. This hydroponic “smart garden,” made by agrilution, uses OSRAM’s LED technology to make it easy to grow greens and herbs. “With the plantCube, we meet two different global trends: the desire for people living in big cities to have a healthy diet alongside a switch to local food production,” Maximilian Lössl, co-founder of agrilution, said. “With this closed system, you are able to reduce water consumption and keep the use of fertilizers to a minimum, while eliminating the need for pesticides.” One of OSRAM’s breakthroughs — both in outer space and on Earth — is using different wavelengths of light to control plants’ growth cycles. Plants can then be harvested more or less frequently, as needed. “Light recipes” can also increase the nutrients and vitamins in plants and alter their flavors. OSRAM continues to collaborate with labs and universities to fine-tune and explore applications. + OSRAM Images via OSRAM

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This high-tech LED lighting could grow veggies in space

Space10 is taking on fast food with bug-based burgers and meatballs

March 15, 2018 by  
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Space10 is re-inventing our favorite fast food dishes in a delicious and sustainable way. We’ve all heard that meat is awful for the environment, but that doesn’t make the cravings for a juicy burger easier to ignore. And what’s a backyard barbecue without the hot dogs? Thanks to Space10’s Bug Burger, not-Dog, Microgreen Ice Cream and Neatball, you won’t have to give up your fast food favorites while still staying virtuous. Space10 is all about figuring out ways to make the future a better place to be. They’ve tackled everything from furniture to urban gardening , and now they’re perfecting sustainable, healthy eating. To illustrate their innovations, the IKEA-based group has created a menu that will get your mouth watering. The Dogless Hotdog is a twist on the classic made out of a spirulina bun topped with dried and glazed baby carrots, beet ketchup, cucumber and herb salad. Thanks to the micro-algae bun, it packs more protein than a real hotdog. The Bug Burger is made out of beetroot, parsnip, potatoes and mealworm with a locally, hydroponically-grown salad mix topping. We tasted a version of the burger, and trust us, you’ll never miss a beef burger again. Related: IKEA’s SPACE10 lab is bringing a pop-up vertical farm to London Space10 has also taken on the iconic IKEA meatball with the Neatball. One version is made out of mealworms, and another out of root veggies. If all this talk about bugs has you (ahem) bugging out, it’s worth noting that bugs are a sustainable source of protein, but they don’t have to taste like insects. In Space10’s in-house chef’s capable hands, you would never even know that you are munching on mealworm, and that’s their goal. Space10 wants us to move away from carbon-heavy meals without giving up the flavor or convenience of a fast food meal. To round it all out, Spac10 created the LOKAL salad, which is made out of microgreens grown hydroponically in the Space10 basement. And these aren’t your basic microgreens – the salad options include red frill mustard, lemon balm and borage; pea sprouts, pink stem radish and thyme; and red-veined sorrel, broccoli and tarragon. Don’t worry, they didn’t forget dessert. Their microgreen ice cream is made out of fennel, coriander, basil or mint with a low-sugar base sweetened with apple juice, apples and lemon juice. Sadly, you can’t get these treats anywhere but Space10 right now, but next time you wish you had a burger, imagine the possibilities. + Space10

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Space10 is taking on fast food with bug-based burgers and meatballs

World’s Smallest Garden lets you recycle old bottles into adorable hydroponic gardens

June 7, 2017 by  
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You can always recycle an old wine bottle , but what if you could transform it into a tiny garden instead? Urban Leaf empowers people to grow food at home through the World’s Smallest Garden, and upcycle used bottles into planters. It takes minutes to put together one of the mini gardens, which can grow greens and herbs year-round – and you can snag one on the cheap right now on Kickstarter . The World’s Smallest Garden is comprised of a 3D-printed cylindrical device, or plug, that fits right into the neck of an old bottle. The plastic used in the product is biodegradable . Users fill the bottle with water, insert the device filled with soil and seeds, and sit back and let the plants grow. Plants can draw on that initial water source for a month, and then users can add water as needed. Related: Build your own indoor garden with modular LEGO-like blocks Dill, lettuce, bok choy, and basil are just a few of the plants that can be grown with the World’s Smallest Garden. Users will be able to start harvesting the plants after around four to six weeks. The team designed the garden with the idea that plants would grow just in the bottle, although co-founder Robert Elliott told Inhabitat it should work to move a plant into a planter since hydroponically grown plants typically transplant well. They’ve been able to grow herbs like mint and parsley for five months in bottles, and even grew dwarf tomatoes to fruit in a World’s Smallest Garden. Elliott and Nathan Littlewood started Urban Leaf to work towards a better food system. On their website they say they believe growing food in urban areas solves many of the issues with the modern food industry , allowing for less waste, less packaging, and shorter supply chains. But many people living in cities don’t have a lot of space to grow gardens, an obstacle Urban Leaf overcomes with the World’s Smallest Garden. Elliott told Inhabitat, “The design process for the World’s Smallest Garden was an effort to create the most minimal product that still effectively grew plants. We started with a ‘bells and whistles’ prototype and removed lights, pumps, multiple substrates, nutrient packets, and even the reservoir. Brown or green glass bottles are a natural fit for a reservoir (they block harmful red/blue light while allowing you to see in) and most people just throw them away! By selling just the essential component to turn existing waste into a hydroponic reservoir we save customers money and reduce our manufacturing and shipping environmental impact.” Urban Leaf is currently crowdfunding on Kickstarter . You can get a single pack that comes with three plugs and seeds for $15. Check out the Kickstarter here . + Urban Leaf Images courtesy of Urban Leaf

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World’s Smallest Garden lets you recycle old bottles into adorable hydroponic gardens

ELIOOO is an Instruction Book That Shows You How to Turn IKEA Parts Into a Hydroponic Garden System

October 4, 2012 by  
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Want to know how a hydroponic system works? Or maybe build your own?  ELIOOO is an instruction book that shows green thumbs how to build a hydroponic garden system using IKEA components! The book, which is currently seeking funding , contains hand-drawn illustrations that show you everything you need to know on how to construct and operate six different types and sizes of hydroponic devices. To find our more check out the ELIOOO Indiegogo funding page here . + ELIOOO The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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ELIOOO is an Instruction Book That Shows You How to Turn IKEA Parts Into a Hydroponic Garden System

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