Earth911 Reader: 1.5° C Warming Is Inevitable and the World Appears Ready to Respond

January 9, 2021 by  
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The Earth911 Reader consolidates useful news about science, business, sustainability, … The post Earth911 Reader: 1.5° C Warming Is Inevitable and the World Appears Ready to Respond appeared first on Earth 911.

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Earth911 Reader: 1.5° C Warming Is Inevitable and the World Appears Ready to Respond

Get a Lifetime Subscription to Babbel Language Learning App at 55% Off

January 9, 2021 by  
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Communication helps us bridge the divide. By learning a new … The post Get a Lifetime Subscription to Babbel Language Learning App at 55% Off appeared first on Earth 911.

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Get a Lifetime Subscription to Babbel Language Learning App at 55% Off

Trump administration quietly accepts 2016 climate deal

November 30, 2017 by  
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Will President Donald Trump respect a climate deal finalized while Barack Obama was still president? After pulling the United States out of the 2015 Paris Agreement , and working to undo many of Obama’s climate regulations , the idea seems unbelievable – but it appears Trump’s administration won’t try to back out of the 2016 Kigali Amendment, under which the government would have to limit climate change -contributing refrigerants and coolants known as hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Last year in Rwanda, delegates struck a deal to mandate countries to phase out the production and use of HFCs. The man-made chemicals “can be thousands of times more potent than carbon dioxide in contributing to climate change,” according to the United Nations Environment Program . And it appears the Trump administration won’t bow out of the deal. Related: This could be the most important climate action in 2016 Judith Garber, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary at the United States Department of State, said last week in Montreal , “The United States believes the Kigali Amendment represents a pragmatic and balanced approach to phasing down the production and consumption of HFCs, and therefore we support the goals and approach of the Amendment.” She noted America was among the first countries that ratified the Montreal Protocol . But there’s no word yet on when the move could occur for this new amendment. Speaking at the 29th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol, Garber said, “There are a number of steps in our domestic process that we would need to complete before reaching a final decision on transmittal of the Kigali Amendment to the U.S. Senate for its advice and consent. There is no timeline currently determined for these steps, but we have initiated the process to consider U.S. ratification of the Amendment.” Scientific American said America has taken around two to four years to ratify amendments in the past. 20 countries have already approved the Kigali Amendment, so it’s already achieved the required threshold of support and will go into effect in January 2019. Via Scientific American Images via Depositphotos ( 1 ,

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Trump administration quietly accepts 2016 climate deal

This could be the most important climate action in 2016

July 19, 2016 by  
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After the Montreal Protocol treaty banned chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, almost 30 years ago, world leaders are once again meeting to discuss a possible treaty amendment that would target hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs . Many turned to HFCs to use in air conditioners and solvents after CFCs were banned, but HFCs are said to warm the planet even more than carbon dioxide. Diplomats will meet in Vienna this month to consider an amendment which would ” phase down ” HFCs. HFC-134a, which the Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development says is the ” most abundant and fastest growing ” of the HFCs, stays in Earth’s atmosphere for 13.4 years. Granted, that’s not as long as carbon dioxide stays in the atmosphere, but over 100 years, HFC-134a results in ” 1,300 times as much warming as carbon dioxide .” A 2015 study revealed if HFC emissions continue to grow as they are today, by 2050, they could contribute the ” equivalent to nine to 19 percent of carbon dioxide emissions .” Related: Antarctic ozone layer shows “first fingerprints of healing” Scripps Institution of Oceanography climate scientist Veerabhadran Ramanathan told The Washington Post, “The HFCs effect now is very small. The problem with the HFCs is it’s the fastest-growing greenhouse gas . So by banning HFCs, you prevent another disaster downstream. It could be as high as half to one degree [Celsius] by the end of the century.” According to a press release from the United Nations Environment Programme, if parties agree on an amendment to phase down HFCs, the world could avoid the equivalent of around ” 150 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide .” Paul Bledsoe, Former Director of Communications in the White House Climate Change Task Force under President Clinton, told The Washington Post, “The phase out of HFCs will achieve the largest temperature reduction in this century – 0.9 degrees Fahrenheit – of any available policy action.” Via The Washington Post Images via Schezar on Flickr and Coryn Wolk on Flickr

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This could be the most important climate action in 2016

Grand Canyon Fuller Fire scorches 13,382 acres with zero containment

July 19, 2016 by  
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The lighting-caused forest fire blazing through the North Rim of the Grand Canyon doubled in size over the weekend. The Fuller Fire jumped from 5,940 acres to 13,382 on Monday, with zero containment to date. Dry and windy conditions on Saturday night helped the blaze spread through treetops near Imperial Point on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon . Currently more than 550 crew members are trying to manage the inferno that began on June 29. Some cloud cover and high humidity has hampered some of the spread since then, yet those in the area are still encouraged to take precautions. Related: Like Chernobyl all over again: Forest fires release plutonium particles into the air The Public Information Officer from the Navajo Nation , Mihio Manus, reached out to nearby residents who may face hazards associated with smoke inhalation. A full list of precautions can be found here, including the importance of following local air quality reports, taking steps to ensure the cleanest air possible indoors, reducing physical exertion, and possibly finding alternative shelter. Still, the Forest Service notes this is a natural fire with numerous ecological benefits. “This fire will help restore and protect the beauty and health of this forest for generations to come,” said Chris Marks, National Park Service Deputy Fire Management Officer. “This is an incredibly unique opportunity for visitors to see not only the canyon itself, but fire playing its role on the land.” Via NBC 12 News , AZ Family Images via Grand Canyon National Park , Twitter

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Grand Canyon Fuller Fire scorches 13,382 acres with zero containment

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