Hungary announces preemptive ban on fur farms

December 2, 2020 by  
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Hungary’s ministerial commissioner of animal protection, Péter Óvári, announced this week that farming mink, foxes, ferrets and coypu will not be allowed in the country. These animals are not currently farmed there. But now that millions of mink have been slaughtered in other European countries due to COVID-19 concerns, Hungarian officials worried that fur farmers might try to move their operations to Hungary . “This is a precautionary measure that shuts the door to that happening, and that is a good outcome for human health and animal welfare ,” said Joanna Swabe, senior director of public affairs for Humane Society International (HSI) Europe, as reported by VegNews . Related: Denmark’s top fur cooperative is closing The COVID-19 virus has spread between animals on mink farms in some European countries, including Denmark, the Netherlands, France, Spain, Greece and Italy. Infected minks have been identified in at least 15 U.S. farms in Wisconsin, Michigan and Utah. Denmark and the Netherlands have slaughtered millions of mink to stop the spread of zoonotic disease . Health experts worry that the virus could mutate in the animals, which could spell disaster for vaccine development. The strange thing about Hungary’s decision is that while local farmers don’t raise mink, foxes, ferrets or coypu (aka nutria), they do raise chinchillas for fur and plan to continue doing so. “For as long as the animal exploitation of fur farming is tolerated, the potential for reservoirs of animal to human pathogens will persist,” Swabe said, “and so HSI hopes that the Hungarian government will also consider strengthening its ban by shutting down the country’s chinchilla fur farms too, and make fur farming history in Hungary.” Chinchillas are native to South America, but their extremely soft, luxurious fur has made them susceptible to international fur farmers who want to turn the sensitive, nocturnal creatures into coats and cash. A company called Wanger is responsible for much of the fur farming across southeast Europe, including in Hungary, Serbia and Bosnia. Activists have used the hashtag #stopwanger when protesting this company. Via VegNews , Respect for Animals Image via Jo-Anne McArthur

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Hungary announces preemptive ban on fur farms

How effective stakeholder engagement shaped Samsonite’s ESG strategy

November 16, 2020 by  
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How effective stakeholder engagement shaped Samsonite’s ESG strategy Christine Rile… Mon, 11/16/2020 – 01:00 In March, Samsonite announced “Our Responsible Journey,” a new global sustainability strategy that outlines its commitments across four priority areas: Product Innovation; Carbon Action; Thriving Supply Chain; and Our People, including engagement, development, diversity and inclusion. Samsonite is proud of its 110-year history of industry leadership in the innovation, quality and durability of its products. With Our Responsible Journey, Samsonite strives to lead the lifestyle bag and travel luggage industry across key sustainability indicators, including the use of recycled materials in its products and packaging and achieving carbon neutrality across its owned and operated facilities. With strong support from the entire senior management team and especially from Samsonite CEO Kyle Gendreau, the company has embarked on this journey to make sustainability a key tenet of its brand promise. The goal is to keep the world traveling while staying true to Samsonite’s long-standing ethos, the “Golden Rule,” which guides how we treat each other and care for the world we live in. Our CEO and the Samsonite leadership team wholeheartedly supported the initiative and even encouraged us to up-level some key goals in order to truly lead the industry in sustainability. Samsonite first disclosed the state of its environmental, social and governance (ESG) journey with the publication of its first ESG report in 2016, a requirement for the company’s listing on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. When I joined as the company’s first global director of sustainability in December 2017, I was tasked with developing a global ESG strategy that would include attainable goals and the action plans that would enable the company to demonstrate continuous improvement and progress toward achieving those goals. We report our progress annually in Samsonite’s ESG report. From the very beginning, the Samsonite executive team empowered me to take the lead on developing an industry-leading approach. The team was directly involved in every phase of the project, including providing feedback, participating in interviews and dedicating resources from their respective regions and functional areas. With executive support, I engaged with Brodie, a London-based consulting firm, to co-lead our materiality assessment. Materiality assessments matter I am a firm believer in the value of materiality assessments, especially when a company is first developing a sustainability strategy. It enables you to identify and validate your issues objectively; educate your company and colleagues about your ESG efforts; effectively allocate resources for your ESG strategy and strengthen credibility with external stakeholders. As we progressed through the internal interview process, I was continually impressed by the number of initiatives already underway to increase the use of sustainable materials in our products and to reduce our carbon footprint. For example, Samsonite North America launched its first product made with post-consumer recycled PET fabric, in January 2018, one month after I started. And by the end of my first year, we already had diverted nearly 30 million PET bottles from landfills through our global use of post-consumer recycled PET fabric in our products. In addition, the company already had installed solar panels on its manufacturing facilities in Hungary and Belgium and had plans to install them on its manufacturing facility in India. It became clear that one of my primary responsibilities would be to identify and organize all of these existing efforts under a comprehensive, focused strategy. Based on the outcomes of the materiality assessment, we identified four key pillars focused on Samsonite’s products, carbon footprint, supply chain and people. One key learning ;from the materiality assessment was that when people thought about sustainability, they often defined it in the context of the environment. As a result, we realized we had to include a brief overview of the issues that fall under the umbrella of ESG so people would evaluate the business across a broader range of initiatives. We further identified two action platforms within each pillar that would allow the company to set goals and to communicate our progress. For example, one pillar focuses on product innovation because Samsonite’s ambition is to lighten the journey of its customers by creating the best products using the most sustainable and innovative materials, methods and models. Within that pillar, we have an action platform that focuses specifically on materials innovation to drive continuous improvement toward developing new, more sustainable materials and increasing the use of more sustainable materials in Samsonite products and packaging. The other action platform targets the product lifecycle and underscores the company’s efforts to continue to make products that are built to last, repairable and, eventually, recyclable. Goals that are specific, yet ambitious The next step was to articulate specific goals and, ultimately, we identified nine global goals with targets set for 2025 and 2030. One of Samsonite’s goals is to achieve carbon neutrality across its owned and operated facilities by 2030. Recognizing that the company’s impact extends beyond its own facilities, we also set a goal to estimate, track and support actions to reduce Scope 3 emissions — those emissions tied to Samonite’s business but outside our control. Our CEO and the Samsonite leadership team wholeheartedly supported the initiative and even encouraged us to up-level some key goals in order to truly lead the industry in sustainability. One of our original goals focused on developing a recyclable suitcase. The feedback was that this was too narrow in its scope. The final goal is more aspirational and states that the company will continue to develop innovative solutions to ensure the durability of its products, extend the life of products and develop viable end-of-life solutions to divert as many of its products from the landfill for as long as possible. The directive was to expand the company’s ambition and further incentivize continuous innovation. The resulting set of goals better reflect Samsonite’s vision and its ambition. Complementing this effort, we needed to establish a global carbon footprint across 1,500 retail, office, manufacturing and distribution facilities worldwide. Partnering with Industrial Economics (IEc), an environmental consulting firm, we collaborated with cross-functional leads worldwide. Specifically, we worked with individuals responsible for the equipment and operations at our owned and operated manufacturing and distribution centers; representatives from our IT and HR departments who source office equipment and train employees on energy-efficient behaviors; and employees from our retail and development teams who make decisions about lighting and real estate. We also worked with global finance teams to collect hundreds of utility bills to ensure an accurate and representative sample size. From all this data, we established a baseline using 2017 data. An extended dialogue While the process is relatively straightforward, Brodie, IEc and I did not do it in a vacuum. Critical to our success was engaging a wide-ranging group of internal stakeholders and subject matter experts. Samsonite operates using a primarily decentralized management structure across its four key regions: North America; Asia; Europe; and Latin America. With the strong support of our regional presidents, we formed a global sustainability committee and a global carbon reduction committee. Membership is varied across functional areas and included human resources, marketing, sourcing, facilities, retail, finance and product development. Participants are nominated by their regional president based on their contribution to the company’s sustainability efforts and/or their interest in the topic. Another way we engaged internal stakeholders was by holding extensive feedback sessions with representatives from different functional areas about the respective goals to ensure that they would be able to successfully implement initiatives and provide data that would be useful and practical when demonstrating progress. The directive was to expand the company’s ambition and further incentivize continuous innovation. The resulting set of goals better reflect Samsonite’s vision and its ambition. For example, when we first set a product-related goal, we recommended establishing a target percentage of sustainable materials across our product lines. As we engaged the design and sourcing teams, it became clear that the target percentage was distracting us from the intent of the goal to increase our use of sustainable materials. There were endless ways to define that number, and we would need to spend significant time determining how to measure it. Rather than significantly delaying the goal-setting process, we decided to develop the quantitative target as part of measurement process. Now that the goals have been announced, we are actively working with marketing, design and sourcing to clearly define how we will demonstrate progress against our goal to increase the use of materials with sustainable credentials in all our products and packaging to lessen our impact on the environment. The global carbon reduction committee was involved in the process of choosing the environmental consulting firm, reviewing proposals, meeting with the candidates and making a final recommendation to work with IEc. The individual committee members, along with others, also provided feedback on the data-collection process. We shared both the results and the credit with everyone who was part of the process. This extensive stakeholder engagement meant that the process took two years from launching the materiality assessment to announcing the strategy. I am proud Samsonite has a sustainability approach that everyone can feel ownership of, and ultimately all of us are invested in its successful implementation. The world has changed a lot over the past two years, and especially during the past six months. Sustainability is increasingly important to consumers as more and more, we recognize the impact of our behaviors and consumption habits on the environment. I am proud that Samsonite has developed an ESG strategy that aligns with my personal and professional commitments and with Samsonite’s ethos, the “Golden Rule,” which guides how we treat each other and care for the world we live in. Pull Quote Our CEO and the Samsonite leadership team wholeheartedly supported the initiative and even encouraged us to up-level some key goals in order to truly lead the industry in sustainability. The directive was to expand the company’s ambition and further incentivize continuous innovation. The resulting set of goals better reflect Samsonite’s vision and its ambition. Topics Corporate Strategy Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off The interior of a Samsonite facility. Courtesy of Samsonite Close Authorship

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Luxury condo in Budapest will bring residents closer to nature

July 24, 2019 by  
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Hungarian architect István Benyei’s design studio has created a new luxury condo for Budapest that will immerse residents in nature. Conceived as a tranquil getaway from the hustle and bustle of city living, the proposed Budapest condo will comprise four apartments that boast views of the forest, gardens and water. To reduce impact on the environment, the construction will follow passive house principles and preserve existing trees. Nestled in Budapest’s forested hills, the planned condo takes advantage of its lush surroundings with full-height glazing on all floors and covered balconies. The building’s location on a steep plot allows it to be almost completely hidden from view; the top floor will be level with the street. To minimize visual interference with the landscape, the architects have tucked the parking garage underground so that the entrance will be accessed via a footbridge. Rather than fencing, subtle architectural and landscaping solutions were used to mark property lines. “As our lives become increasingly metropolitan, many of us are seeking to be closer to nature,” the architecture studio explained in a project statement. “The pace of urban life can be exhausting as we lose ourselves to our mobile phones and the digital age, which can make the importance of connections with our fellow humans all the more significant. Restoring our connection with both nature and personal relationships is crucial for a harmonious lifestyle, and that’s the overriding thought behind Benyei’s architecture studio’s latest plan. The modern-day sense of a luxury residential space goes beyond quality of design or premium construction materials; the true luxury is a building’s ability to unite family, friends and the silence of nature.” Related: Solar-powered POP-UP Park takes over underused Budapest square The four apartments vary in size from 130 to 290 square meters, and each will have a private terrace and a private garden with water features that help reflect light into the living spaces. The building will be topped with an undulating roof that echoes the surrounding hilly topography. The building is slated for completion in 2020. + István Bényei -B13 architect Ltd. Images via István Bényei -B13 architect Ltd.

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Tunnel Through Time celebrates Canada’s open-minded attitude towards immigrants

October 31, 2016 by  
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The structure was designed to honor victims of the Hungarian revolution, but also recalls the turning point in Canadian immigration policy that shaped the country’s open-minded attitude towards immigrants in general. After the 1956 revolution, Canada welcomed 37,565 Hungarian immigrants, including 200 young engineers from the Faculty of Wood Sciences at the University of Sopron, who made a significant contribution to the famous Canadian wood industry. Related: Hello Wood Unveils Epic Butterfly House Pavilion for the Budapest Spring Festival The Consulate General of Hungary in Toronto commissioned Hello Wood to design the installation. The studio sent eight people to Toronto and, with the consulate’s help, locals and Canadian Hungarians built the structure to include an entrance symbolizing events of 1956 and referencing the hole protesters cut in the middle of the Hungarian flag during demonstrations. The exit, on the other hand, symbolizes new hope and takes the shape of Canada’s national symbol, the maple leaf. The installation was planned to stay in Budapest Park for a month before being moved near to a spot near Niagara Falls , where it will remain in the custody of a Canadian Hungarian scout group. + Hello Wood Photos by Gergely Szinnay

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Crazy gun shoots frozen tears at things that make you cry

October 31, 2016 by  
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https://vimeo.com/188858189 Tear Gun is a strange-looking pistol that collects tears in a silicon pocket under the eye, freezes them in a brass bottle and shoots them like bullets. The design is Chen’s final Master’s project at the Design Academy of Eindhoven , and a way to visualize her personal struggle in a poetic way. She designed the gun after her then tutor Jan Boelen ( Z33 ) pushed her to take a critical approach and confront his opinions, forcing her to confront her obedience to authority that stems from her Taiwanese cultural conditioning. But all she could do was cry. Related: Cheese Made from Olafur Eliasson’s Tears on Display in Dublin Tear Gun was Chen’s way to express her previously repressed emotions using design as a vehicle to stand up for herself. She told Inhabitat after that episode she decided to embrace her emotions, and to “just accept the tears, but also take advantage of them.” We spotted Yi-Fei Chen’s Tear Gun at the Design Academy of Eindhoven’s Graduation Show during Dutch Design Week 2016. + Yi-Fei Chen + Design Academy of Eindhoven + Dutch Design Week Photos by Ana Lisa Alperovich for Inhabitat and Yi-Fei Chen

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New Budapest museum will feature a sweeping green roof resembling a skateboard ramp

May 20, 2016 by  
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The firm calls the project The Gate of the City Park and it is expected to open in 2019. Architects István Ferencz, Marcel Ferencz and György Détári take pride in the project’s striking design, shaped much like a skateboard ramp and intended to give visitors ample space both indoors and outdoors. Related: 6 new inspiring & sustainable museums you must see now A green roof will adorn the site, meant to serve as an open gathering space for the public and frame an existing monument for the Hungarian Revolution in 1956. The interior will feature several floors devoted to exhibitions and an open area in the center of the museum. The architects said, “The physical and visual division of the building into two parts expresses the duality of the basic function, and also reflects the surrounding city fabric.” + Napur Architect Via  Dezeen Images via Napur Architect

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Horseshoe-shaped tourist center in Hungary gets its power from the sun

February 23, 2016 by  
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Concrete and glass museums in Budapest are positive and negative images of each other

November 10, 2015 by  
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Beautiful Roma music center in Hungary shows how socially-conscious design can cultivate talent

March 13, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Beautiful Roma music center in Hungary shows how socially-conscious design can cultivate talent Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , eco design , felsoor hungary , green design , integration , non profit work , roma musicians , Snetberger Music Talent Center , Social Architecture , social design , social project

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Sou Fujimoto to design lotus-like House of Hungarian Music museum in Budapest

December 23, 2014 by  
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