Eco-friendly AgriNesture buildings promote agriculture and job growth in Vietnam

September 10, 2018 by  
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Although the majority of Vietnam’s population relies on agriculture , rapid industrialization and a skyrocketing population in recent years has led to urban sprawl and the decimation of fertile agricultural land. To combat these trends, local architecture firm H&P Architects has made mending the relationship between people and nature one of the main guiding principles throughout its work. In its latest example of eco-friendly architecture, the firm created AgriNesture, a green housing prototype that can be clustered together in vulnerable rural areas to revitalize the local population. In M?o Khê, a town a few hours from Hanoi in northern Vietnam, sits one of the first prototypes of AgriNesture. Likened to a “cube of earth cut out from a field,” the boxy building is clad in locally sourced materials including plant fibers, rammed earth and bricks. The two-story structure is also built with a reinforced concrete frame — which cost VND 150 million (equivalent to USD 6,500) — and topped with a green roof , where agriculture can be practiced. The structure is also integrated with a rainwater collection system for irrigation. A light well brings natural light and ventilation deep into the home. The AgriNesture structures can be clustered in blocks of four around a central courtyard. These building clusters lend themselves to multipurpose uses, such as multigenerational housing, education, health or community centers. Because the cost-effective architecture only relies on two main parts — the reinforced concrete ‘Frame’ and the locally sourced ‘Cover’ materials — owners will not only be able to select their own surface materials best suited to their local conditions, but also customize the interior to their liking and add additional floors if desired. This hands-on and site-specific building process will help create jobs and bring economic stability, according to the architects. Related: This stunning brick “cave house” in Vietnam is open to the elements “AgriNesture will be, therefore, a place of convergence, interaction and adaptation of various local contrasts (natural vs. man-made, residence vs. agriculture, individuals vs. communities , etc.),” the firm said, “thus enabling it to be not only a Physical space but also a truly Human place.” + H&P Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Nguyen TienThanh

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Eco-friendly AgriNesture buildings promote agriculture and job growth in Vietnam

This stunning brick "cave house" in Vietnam is open to the elements

April 17, 2018 by  
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Vietnamese firm H&P Architects has created a unique “cave” fit for human habitation. Their “Brick Cave” townhouse has three levels of brick walls, each one with apertures that create a playful atmosphere of light and shadow throughout the interior. Pockets of greenery accent the brick construction throughout the house, and a vegetable garden on the roof caps off the structure. Built on a corner lot in ?ông Anh, Vietnam, the home is nestled on the street and blends into the urban landscape. The architects chose to use brick in the construction to create not just a unique home design, but one with an ecological shade system. The multiple walls both filter natural light into the home and shade the interior from the region’s searing summer heat. Related: H&P Architects’ Bamboo Homes Float Above Rising Flood Waters on Recycled Oil Drums The idiosyncratic design is a labyrinth of walkways, stairs and angles illuminated by streams of natural light. In fact, to use the sun to the home’s advantages, the architects conducted a number of studies on the sun’s daily positions in relation to the house. Although the apertures may appear a bit random at first sight, they were strategically implemented to keep the home cool in the summer heat while providing as much natural light as possible. According to H&P Architects , the unconventional combination of bricks and greenery was essential to connect the home to its surroundings: “Brick Cave encompasses a chain of space…with random apertures gradually shifting from openness/publicity to closeness/privacy and vice versa. The combination of ‘close’ and ‘open’ creates diverse relations with the surroundings and thus helps blur the boundaries between in and out, houses and streets/alleys, human and nature.” In addition to having various openings, the walls are slanted inwards. This represents another conscious choice on the part of the architects–the slanted walls provide better viewing angles of the surrounding area and add a sense of nature to the design, letting in elements such as rain and wind. Harsh elements are commonly to blame for house flooding in this region, so the architects wanted a resilient design that would aid in protecting the home by letting the elements pass through it rather than crash into it, essentially creating a safe shelter. + H&P Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Nguyen Tien Thanh

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This stunning brick "cave house" in Vietnam is open to the elements

Plant-covered bamboo structure in Vietnam offers low-cost sanitation and food

November 25, 2016 by  
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The project is based on the same principle as the firm’s previous project in Son Lap, aiming to provide a low-cost sanitation solution that can be easily and quickly constructed and transported across the country. Toigetation 2 lightly touches the ground with a layer of vegetation on its four sides. This layer of foliage helps regulate indoor temperatures and functions as a food source. Related: Vo Trong Nghia Unveils Lovely Low-Cost Housing Made from Locally Sourced Palm Trees Local craftsmen used locally-sourced materials to construct the building. Solar panels provide energy for the lighting, while rainwater and waste water are used for cleaning and irrigating the adjacent garden. Efficient, low-cost construction methods and the use of local materials make this project replicable in areas experiencing a severe shortage of proper sanitation facilities , including schools in rural Vietnam . + H&P Architects Via Archdaily Photos by Nguyen Tien Thanh

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Plant-covered bamboo structure in Vietnam offers low-cost sanitation and food

Innovative recycled ceramic bricks keep this Hanoi house’s interior fresh and clean

November 15, 2016 by  
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The building features an interesting double-skin facade and several voids in its interior. These elements improve the quality of indoor air and work with, not against, the tropical weather conditions of the region. The outer layer is made of recycled ceramic bricks that help purify dust and smoke and suck in fresh air. Related: These LEGO-like recycled plastic bricks create sturdy homes for just $5,200 Open panels help cool down interior spaces and promote the interaction between the inner and outer scenery. Randomly arranged pot plants absorb humidity and mitigate calorific radiation. The house creates a “natural sense of breathing rhythm” and presents a healthier alternative to what’s being built in Dong Anh. + H&P Architects Via Archdaily Photos by Nguyen Tien Thanh

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Innovative recycled ceramic bricks keep this Hanoi house’s interior fresh and clean

Low-cost bamboo restroom in Vietnam is completely covered in leafy foliage

January 9, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Low-cost bamboo restroom in Vietnam is completely covered in leafy foliage Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: affordable design , bamboo , green architecture , H&P Architects , low cost architecture , rainwater , rainwater harvesting , restroom resign , reused materials , reused pipes , rural architecture , Vietnam

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Low-cost bamboo restroom in Vietnam is completely covered in leafy foliage

H&P Architects’ Bamboo Homes Float Above Rising Flood Waters on Recycled Oil Drums

April 18, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of H&P Architects’ Bamboo Homes Float Above Rising Flood Waters on Recycled Oil Drums Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: affordable disaster housing , bamboo housing , eco design , floating housing , green design , H&P Architects , Southeast Asia housing , sustainable design        

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H&P Architects’ Bamboo Homes Float Above Rising Flood Waters on Recycled Oil Drums

Pavilion of Dream Terraces: H&P Architects Unveil Rice Paddy-Covered Pavilion for Viet Nam’s Expo 2015

April 10, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Pavilion of Dream Terraces: H&P Architects Unveil Rice Paddy-Covered Pavilion for Viet Nam’s Expo 2015 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable agriculture” , eco design , Expo 2015 , green design , H&P Architects , Milan , Recycled Materials , rice farms , salvaged materials , sustainable design , urban agriculture , Viet Nam        

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Pavilion of Dream Terraces: H&P Architects Unveil Rice Paddy-Covered Pavilion for Viet Nam’s Expo 2015

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