Adorable timber cabins in Chile let you glamp among the trees

February 2, 2021 by  
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In the Chiloé Archipelago in southern Chile, a hidden gem of four tiny homes awaits nature-lovers. Remotely located in the commune of Queilén, Tiny Houses Comarca Contuy is a unique retreat that offers isolation in nature, warm hospitality and unforgettable “ glamping ” — glamorous camping — in four timber cabins elevated into the treetops. These cabins were designed by Chilean architecture firm Utreras Arquitectos. Completed in 2016, Tiny Houses Comarca County was commissioned by Comarca Contuy, an entity that promotes tourism in the region through art, culture and nature-related ventures. Nestled between the Chilean evergreen trees known as coigüe, the site-specific cluster of four cabins are carefully crafted in response to the uneven topography and views overlooking the Paildad estuary. As a result, the timber cabins are elevated and located at different heights. Related: A homey, floating cabin makes for the ultimate romantic getaway in South Australia “The idea was born from creating four shelters ‘glamping’ style among the trees, looking for formality and disposition of the latter, as well as the birds’ nests, through the proposed circular windows,” say the architects in a project statement. “Each one of these four shelters has spaces to be in and spend the night, connecting each other and the rest of the place through a wooden footbridge . The different views to the exterior, the immersion in the middle of the trees and the proximity with the estuary, make it possible to feel the wind and some species of birds in a close way when entering and being on the work.” To blend the buildings into the environment, all four cabins are clad in timber and elevated on cypress foundation piles. Local coigüe wood was used for the primary and secondary structural beams, while cinnamon wood was used for partitions and trusses. Each unit is equipped with a private patio, a kitchen with an oven and a shared bathroom with a shower. The sleeping areas are located on the second floor. + Utreras Arquitectos Photography by Gustavo Burgos via Utreras Arquitectos

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Adorable timber cabins in Chile let you glamp among the trees

Kamp C hits a milestone with largest 3D-printer for concrete

November 2, 2020 by  
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Belgium-based provincial Centre for Sustainability and Innovation in construction, Kamp C, recently used Europe’s largest 3D concrete printer to complete an impressive accomplishment. The company created the world’s first two-story house to be  3D-printed  in one piece, a 90-square meter dwelling measuring eight meters tall (the average size of terraced houses in the region). “What makes this house so unique, is that we printed it with a fixed 3D concrete printer,” Emiel Ascione, the project manager at Kamp C, said in a press release. “Other houses that were printed around the world only have one floor. In many cases, the components were printed in a factory and were assembled on-site. We, however, printed the entire building envelope in one piece on-site.” Related: Czech Republic’s first 3D-printed floating home will take just 48 hours to build The project’s goal is to raise interest in 3D concrete printing as a building technique in the Belgian construction industry. The industry, like many others, continues to face environmental challenges from material and energy consumption, producing the need for reduced  CO2 emissions  and waste streams despite the growing demand for high-quality, affordable housing. This first house serves as a test that researchers will monitor for solidity over time. In the future, the company hopes to get printing time down from three weeks to just under two days. Kamp C’s printed home is three times sturdier than those built with conventional quick build bricks, according to the company’s project manager. The printing technology saved an estimated 60% on material, time and budget, requiring less wire-mesh reinforcement than similar projects. Highlighting the principle of  circular architecture , the design accommodates multipurpose options from use as a house, meeting space, office or exhibition space. The model home includes an overhang with heavily curved walls and features  low-energy  capabilities with floor and ceiling heating, solar panels in the facade and a heat pump. Future designs will include a green roof. + Kamp C Via Apartment Therapy    Images © Kamp C

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Dramatic arches usher nature inside an alley home in Vietnam

November 2, 2020 by  
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When a young family asked Sanuki Daisuke Architects to design a light-filled house with access to nature in Ho Chi Minh City, the local architecture firm knew from the get-go that it would be crafting a townhouse that was far different from the city norm. Located in a high-density residential area, the long and narrow property wasn’t large enough to accommodate a spacious garden, so the architects decided to bring the outdoors into the home instead. Dubbed the VOM House, the three-story townhouse opens up to the outdoors on the first and second floors to let daylight, wind and even rain inside for an indoor-outdoor living experience like no other. Named for the Vietnamese word that means arch, the VOM House comprises three floors defined by large arched and column-free spaces. Because the clients, a couple with a daughter, made the somewhat unusual request for only two bedrooms — most Vietnamese clients ask for more, according to the architects — the bedrooms were placed on the top floor. As such, the two lower floors can be used as “outdoor rooms.” Related: Villa in Vietnam prioritizes natural light and green space Despite the site’s small size, the architects managed to carve out a small front garden and back garden that bookend the home. The front garden flows seamlessly into a double-height “outdoor living space” on the ground floor that connects to the combined kitchen and dining space in the rear. The clients plan to turn the ground floor into a coffee shop in the future. A small study space that overlooks the downstairs living area is on the floor above. The bedrooms also connect to a roof terrace. To reinforce the connection with nature, trees and plants grow throughout the home. “Although the house is located in a tight residential area in Ho Chi Minh City, many ‘Outdoor Rooms’ create an open and rich living space ,” the architects explained. “We proposed a tropical living space where the family can always feel close to nature under these large arch spaces.” + Sanuki Daisuke Architects Photography by Hiroyuki Oki via Sanuki Daisuke Architects

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Dramatic arches usher nature inside an alley home in Vietnam

Christophe Caranchini proposes resilient floating houses for Kiribati

October 5, 2020 by  
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The Republic of Kiribati, a small nation of islands and atolls in the central Pacific Ocean, is a tropical paradise that’s also believed to be at extreme risk of disappearing due to climate change. In response to a global design competition seeking climate-resilient solutions to housing for Kiribati citizens, French architect Christophe Caranchini has proposed prefabricated floating communities that promote off-grid, communal living. In addition to drawing energy from renewable sources, each modular unit would be optimized for energy efficiency and home gardening. Launched in October 2019, the Kiribati Floating Houses competition was hosted by the Young Architects Competition to generate ideas for a resilient Kiribati. Participants were challenged to create a new housing model that would not only adapt to rising ocean levels but would also honor the native culture and way of life.  Related: Guallart Architects unveil winning bid for a self-sufficient community in China Christophe Caranchini’s submission, titled Kiribati 2.0, proposes a series of floating, prefabricated homes that would be arranged in a circle to promote a sense of community and to weather the forces of tropical storms. Inspired by the typology of existing houses in Kiribati, the modular units would be prefabricated from wood in a workshop and then transported by boat to Kiribati. The units would come in a variety of types for flexibility, from floating bases that accommodate either a deck, agriculture or housing to units that allow for public docking (with or without a ladder), private gardens and terraces or private beach access with a terrace.  The floating homes would span two floors, with the first level dedicated to daytime living and workspaces and the upper level reserved for the bedrooms. The roof would be used as a productive space for growing vegetables and collecting renewable energy via wind turbines and solar panels. Rainwater would also be collected from the roof. A filtering garden would treat wastewater onsite before it’s discharged into the sea. The Kiribati Floating Houses competition ended in January 2020 with the first prize awarded to Polish architect Marcin Kitala’s submission. + Christophe Caranchini Images via Christophe Caranchini

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Christophe Caranchini proposes resilient floating houses for Kiribati

Solar-powered dome in the Texas desert is the perfect place to go off the grid

August 18, 2020 by  
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The Terluna off-grid adobe dome home is located in a remote part of the Texas desert near Big Bend National Park, inside one of the country’s few remaining dark sky ordinance territories. Along with the opportunity to completely cut yourself off from the modern world, the dome’s setting offers incredible views of the night sky along with unobstructed access to the desert horizon. The dome is an earthen structure, built with an adobe barrier, that provides shelter from the elements. In this part of the state, those elements can range from extreme heat and wind to cold and rain. All power comes directly from an installed solar energy system, with just enough energy to also power phones, laptops and lights. Related: Spectacular rammed-earth dome home is tucked deep into a Costa Rican jungle Terluna is isolated, but because the entrance to Big Bend National Park is just a 25-minute drive away, it is easily accessible for those who want to do some exploring. For history buffs, the historic Terlingua Ghost Town can be found about 25 minutes away as well. Wi-Fi is also available in the dome for those who aren’t quite ready to go fully off the grid just yet. Fans of HGTV’s “Mighty Tiny Houses” may recognize the Terluna, as it has been featured on the show in the past. The dome home includes a kitchen with a two-burner propane stove, an oven and a refrigerator. The kitchen sinks get water from a small rain collection tank; guests are recommended to bring their own drinking water. There is space for two people to sleep comfortably, and linens, pillows and blankets are included. Additional space on the pallet couch allows for a third guest. A no-flush, composting toilet can be found in a separate, private outhouse next to the main structure, and guests will have to utilize a nearby coin shower if they want to wash up. The off-grid nature of this space means that occupants will have to sacrifice AC, but the Airbnb stay does have a fan and plenty of windows. + Airbnb Images via Airbnb

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Solar-powered dome in the Texas desert is the perfect place to go off the grid

The future of the fashion industry requires innovative circular systems

July 17, 2020 by  
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The future of the fashion industry requires innovative circular systems Nicole Pamani Fri, 07/17/2020 – 00:15 Agricultural waste from food crops either is traditionally left to rot or is burned, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution. About 270 million tons of banana waste are left to rot annually, and in India, 32 million acres of rice straw are burned. Circular Systems’ Agraloop , in contrast, sees food crop waste as a valuable resource, a feed stock for natural fiber products. Winner of the 2018 Global Change Award , the company aims to unlock value for the textile and fashion industry, for farmers and for the planet. Bard MBA alum Nicole Pamani recently spoke with Isaac Nichelson, CEO and co-founder at Circular Systems , about how the company’s circular production processes are helping to redefine the meaning of sustainable materials in the fashion industry. They discussed how Agraloop functions like a mechanical sheep, and how the COVID-19 pandemic is causing us to rethink the way we produce products.  Nicole Pamani: Tell us the Agraloop story. Isaac Nichelson: Agraloop is the world’s first regenerative industrial system for textile production. It originated from the mind of Yitzac Goldstein, whose natural systems thinking drives him at the core. It’s recently been described by our friend Nick Tipon from Fibershed , one of the world’s experts in regenerative farming practices and fiber systems, as essentially a giant mechanical sheep.   A sheep consumes a lot of biomass left over from food production, basically agricultural stubble. That biomass goes into its belly, where the sheep breaks it down and turns it into nutrition. Finally, the sheep fertilizes the field, trampling it in ever so perfectly, which improves the fertility cycle. This is exactly what Agraloop does at an industrial scale. It takes the leftover biomass from food crop production and upgrades that fiber, using some of the waste to create energy. When we’re done, what’s left over are only beneficial effluent and super high value products, rather than the caustic salts that come from traditional fiber processing or dye processing.  The effluent is actually perfect organic fertilizer, and we take it back to the farms to build soil fertility and further sequester carbon — just like the sheep does. We’re able to provide farmers with more income for waste that was actually climate liability because it’s usually burned.  This is more than just a better way to produce fiber from food crop waste. It’s literally showing the world that we can create industrial systems that are beneficial to humanity and to our habitat. Pamani: How do the textiles produced by Agraloop stack up against recycled fabrics? Nichelson: With this process, we’re changing people’s whole conception of what a recycled fabric is. Traditionally, recycled cotton textiles have been downplayed as inferior because in most cases they are. By tearing apart the fabric, mechanical recycling creates shorter staple fibers, and that creates a less strong yarn product. The lack of strength causes issues like pilling. Because it’s generally blended with recycled polyester, it also has problems of inconsistency. These issues have prevented the massive growth of traditional mechanically recycled textiles.  But that can all be fixed. Yitzac has innovated again around the creation of a yarn system that allows us to produce stronger-than-traditional virgin yarns that are also higher performing than traditional synthetics. Their moisture management will meet or exceed the performance of the Adidas Climate Cool or Nike Dri Fit with no chemical finishing and all recycled and organic inputs. The COVID-19 global pandemic is forcing us to rethink our patterns of consumption and the way we produce things. Pamani: What’s the next big sustainability challenge in the circular fashion industry? Nichelson: We’re having it delivered to us inadvertently right now with the COVID-19 global pandemic. Within this moment so much loss is happening, but it’s also forcing us to rethink our patterns of consumption and the way we produce things. It’s bringing home the idea of how fragile our habitat is and how sacred our health is.  As we sit in our houses, either laid off or working from home with a lot more time on our hands, we’re looking inward at this incredible crisis. The whole world — but especially the tech, style and fashion industry — is collapsing in on itself right now because it’s unbalanced and totally unprepared for what’s to come. What’s necessary is not a revolution, but a resolution to change that resolves to do things differently as a species, not just an industry.  Pamani: Do you see opportunities for collaboration across different levels of production?  Nichelson: We’ve been doing presentations at textile exchanges and with some of the biggest companies in our space about a new way of looking at sustainability and collaboration. We are raising the bar. What we need to be striving for is fixing things — that’s regeneration, that’s true circular. We’re in this incredible moment, this inflection point for humanity, and constructive interference is what’s going to save us. We need it right now on a global basis. Are we going to come out of this into the real hunger games, or are we going to come out of this into a world ready to transform and willing to collaborate? I can tell you that we at Circular Systems are working night and day to do our part to make that collaboration a reality, and we invite everybody else to join us.  The above Q&A is an edited excerpt from the Bard MBA’s June 5 The Impact Report podcast. The Impact Report brings together students and faculty in Bard’s MBA in Sustainability program with leaders in business, sustainability and social entrepreneurship. Pull Quote The COVID-19 global pandemic is forcing us to rethink our patterns of consumption and the way we produce things. Contributors Katie Ellman Topics Circular Economy Food & Agriculture Fashion Food Waste Collective Insight The Sustainable MBA Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Credit:  Rawpixel.com

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The future of the fashion industry requires innovative circular systems

Colorful, solar-powered island home is inspired by local fishermen’s buoys

February 14, 2020 by  
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As one of the most scenic states in the country, Maine is an inspiration for many architects and designers. One architect has managed to use his family’s love of the idyllic state to build a beautiful, solar-powered home on a remote island off its coastline. Architect Noel Fedosh of LUNO Design Studio designed the Seal Cove Residence for his parents, whose love of color and whimsy was embedded into the quirky design. The 1,500-square-foot home is surrounded by the wilderness found on the remote island of Isle Au Haut. The island had been used for the family for years as a special place to enjoy camping vacations. While in the past they stayed in the local lighthouse bed & breakfast, the family decided it was finally time to build their own home to enjoy the picturesque location on a more permanent basis. Related: Israel’s striking LAHO House is wrapped with colorful reclaimed wood The parents are known for their colorful personalities and hobbies, which include solar eclipse chasing and collecting local art pieces . Tasking their son Noel with the design, they wanted to be sure the home represented their love of quirky art and vibrant colors. The resulting Seal Cove Residence manages to encompass not only the family’s unique personality but also some practical features that make the home sustainable . The L-shaped volume is topped with dual pitched roofs. The architect decided to use a natural, muted palette on the exterior so that he could add a few whimsical touches, such as the colorful patchwork siding that wraps around the home. The colorful tiles were actually inspired by Maine’s lobster industry. Local fishermen often hang their specially marked buoys on the side of their houses when they are not being used, creating a playful and personalized look to their homes. Using this as his guide, Noel created a vibrant siding that blended his parents’ love of color with vernacular architecture. Inside, bright colors abound in various forms. The interior layout follows an open plan with plenty of room for socializing. At the heart of the home is the large kitchen, which also features the same colorful wall tiles as the exterior. Bamboo flooring contrasts with the white walls. Fun accessories, such as netted lamps and an upside-down boat hanging from the ceiling, pay homage to the local fishing industry. The home was also designed to use both active and passive features to reduce its energy use. The rooftop was installed with a large solar array that generates ample energy for the home, including the solar water heater. Additionally, the home’s orientation was strategic to make the most of solar gain during the winter and minimize its impact in the summer. + LUNO Design Studio Via ArchDaily Photography by Trent Bell Photography via LUNO Design Studio

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Remote tiny house in the Netherlands has a design inspired by foliage

December 18, 2019 by  
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When a client tasked the team behind Liberté Tiny Houses to create a mobile, minimalist home where she could reconnect with nature, they responded by building the Makatita — a 182-square-foot tiny home with a shape that was inspired by the organic form of a leaf. Located in a remote area of the Netherlands, the Makatita was specifically designed to let the owner enjoy her favorite passions of walking, camping and bushcraft. Accordingly, the architects behind Liberté began their design process by looking directly to Mother Nature for inspiration . Related: This gorgeous tiny home features a greenhouse and wooden pergola The tiny home was built with various organic shapes and materials found in nature, such as foliage, in mind. In fact, according to the designers, Gijsbert Schutten and Gijs Coumou, the home’s angular volume was inspired by the shape of a leaf. “The shape of the house was inspired by the lines that appear when you carefully fold a leaf,” Schutten explained. “The window shutters give the effect of the way light scatters through the forest.” Not just a nod to nature, the tiny home’s severely angled roofline enabled the structure to have ample space for a massive glass facade. Further embedding the home into its environment, the floor-to-ceiling glass panels nearly erase all boundaries between the indoors and outdoors. Inside and out, the structure is clad in pine , creating a warm, cabin setting. Although compact and minimalist, the living space feels open and welcoming. Throughout the interior, the unfinished wood walls, gray vinyl flooring and angular ceiling lend to the industrial design aesthetic. At the request of the homeowner, who prefers to sit on the open-air deck, there are minimal furnishings inside the house. The living space is comprised of a custom bench, which also holds the fireplace with firewood storage underneath, and a single stool made out of a salvaged tree stump. Next to the kitchen, a bespoke table folds out of the wall and can be used for dining or working. A simple wall ladder leads to a sleeping loft with a twin mattress. + Liberté Tiny Houses Via Dwell Images via Liberté Tiny Houses

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Remote tiny house in the Netherlands has a design inspired by foliage

Enhance Your Garden With Bee-utiful Bee Houses

August 12, 2019 by  
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Plenty of backyards are doubling as an enticing bed-and-breakfast. For … The post Enhance Your Garden With Bee-utiful Bee Houses appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Enhance Your Garden With Bee-utiful Bee Houses

TREDJE NATUR proposes angled timber housing that meets UNs sustainability goals

June 13, 2019 by  
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Copenhagen-based architectural firm TREDJE NATUR has unveiled an urban housing proposal that ticks all the right boxes for beautiful and sustainable design. Created to follow the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals — a blueprint of 17 goals ranging from affordable and clean energy to responsible consumption and production — TREDJE NATUR’s proposed mixed-use development is estimated to save 30 to 50 percent of carbon emissions compared to conventional housing construction. Named “New Angle” after the timber townhouses’ sharply pitched rooflines, the site-specific housing development emphasizes safe and low-carbon community living, biodiversity, flexibility and protection from the elements and traffic noise. Created as part of a feasibility study for the Copenhagen Metropolitan Area, New Angle comprises nearly 130,000 square feet of housing and a little over 160,000 square feet of office space. The development has been proposed for a commercial site sandwiched between two different motorways and a ring road. TREDJE NATUR’s design is a direct response to the site conditions, particularly the noise nuisances from surrounding traffic. The layout and shape of the houses create an inward-looking development that ensures optimized daylighting for all residents, ample green space and protection from traffic noise. Set on a parking plinth, the townhouses are arranged in an L-shaped ring with steeply sloped roofs angled toward the central common green space that can be used for urban gardening and recreation. The angle of the roof profiles not only shields residents from traffic noise, but also allows for integrated solar panels with maximum performance and rainwater collection systems. The renderings show the housing would be built primarily from timber with a strong emphasis on the outdoors and neighborly connection. Related: World’s first upcycled high-rise is proposed for Copenhagen “The CO2 savings happen through the building design, choice of materials, systematic solutions, focus on climate and biodiversity and overall by creating a framework for a strong community and a sustainable lifestyle,” explained the architects, who said the design is a more sustainable alternative to the conventional multistory building. “Apart from significant CO2 savings, calculations also show that the project is economically sustainable and can be constructed with low establishment costs compared to similar housing units.” + TREDJE NATUR Images via TREDJE NATUR

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