Solar-powered dome in the Texas desert is the perfect place to go off the grid

August 18, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered dome in the Texas desert is the perfect place to go off the grid

The Terluna off-grid adobe dome home is located in a remote part of the Texas desert near Big Bend National Park, inside one of the country’s few remaining dark sky ordinance territories. Along with the opportunity to completely cut yourself off from the modern world, the dome’s setting offers incredible views of the night sky along with unobstructed access to the desert horizon. The dome is an earthen structure, built with an adobe barrier, that provides shelter from the elements. In this part of the state, those elements can range from extreme heat and wind to cold and rain. All power comes directly from an installed solar energy system, with just enough energy to also power phones, laptops and lights. Related: Spectacular rammed-earth dome home is tucked deep into a Costa Rican jungle Terluna is isolated, but because the entrance to Big Bend National Park is just a 25-minute drive away, it is easily accessible for those who want to do some exploring. For history buffs, the historic Terlingua Ghost Town can be found about 25 minutes away as well. Wi-Fi is also available in the dome for those who aren’t quite ready to go fully off the grid just yet. Fans of HGTV’s “Mighty Tiny Houses” may recognize the Terluna, as it has been featured on the show in the past. The dome home includes a kitchen with a two-burner propane stove, an oven and a refrigerator. The kitchen sinks get water from a small rain collection tank; guests are recommended to bring their own drinking water. There is space for two people to sleep comfortably, and linens, pillows and blankets are included. Additional space on the pallet couch allows for a third guest. A no-flush, composting toilet can be found in a separate, private outhouse next to the main structure, and guests will have to utilize a nearby coin shower if they want to wash up. The off-grid nature of this space means that occupants will have to sacrifice AC, but the Airbnb stay does have a fan and plenty of windows. + Airbnb Images via Airbnb

Excerpt from: 
Solar-powered dome in the Texas desert is the perfect place to go off the grid

The future of the fashion industry requires innovative circular systems

July 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on The future of the fashion industry requires innovative circular systems

The future of the fashion industry requires innovative circular systems Nicole Pamani Fri, 07/17/2020 – 00:15 Agricultural waste from food crops either is traditionally left to rot or is burned, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution. About 270 million tons of banana waste are left to rot annually, and in India, 32 million acres of rice straw are burned. Circular Systems’ Agraloop , in contrast, sees food crop waste as a valuable resource, a feed stock for natural fiber products. Winner of the 2018 Global Change Award , the company aims to unlock value for the textile and fashion industry, for farmers and for the planet. Bard MBA alum Nicole Pamani recently spoke with Isaac Nichelson, CEO and co-founder at Circular Systems , about how the company’s circular production processes are helping to redefine the meaning of sustainable materials in the fashion industry. They discussed how Agraloop functions like a mechanical sheep, and how the COVID-19 pandemic is causing us to rethink the way we produce products.  Nicole Pamani: Tell us the Agraloop story. Isaac Nichelson: Agraloop is the world’s first regenerative industrial system for textile production. It originated from the mind of Yitzac Goldstein, whose natural systems thinking drives him at the core. It’s recently been described by our friend Nick Tipon from Fibershed , one of the world’s experts in regenerative farming practices and fiber systems, as essentially a giant mechanical sheep.   A sheep consumes a lot of biomass left over from food production, basically agricultural stubble. That biomass goes into its belly, where the sheep breaks it down and turns it into nutrition. Finally, the sheep fertilizes the field, trampling it in ever so perfectly, which improves the fertility cycle. This is exactly what Agraloop does at an industrial scale. It takes the leftover biomass from food crop production and upgrades that fiber, using some of the waste to create energy. When we’re done, what’s left over are only beneficial effluent and super high value products, rather than the caustic salts that come from traditional fiber processing or dye processing.  The effluent is actually perfect organic fertilizer, and we take it back to the farms to build soil fertility and further sequester carbon — just like the sheep does. We’re able to provide farmers with more income for waste that was actually climate liability because it’s usually burned.  This is more than just a better way to produce fiber from food crop waste. It’s literally showing the world that we can create industrial systems that are beneficial to humanity and to our habitat. Pamani: How do the textiles produced by Agraloop stack up against recycled fabrics? Nichelson: With this process, we’re changing people’s whole conception of what a recycled fabric is. Traditionally, recycled cotton textiles have been downplayed as inferior because in most cases they are. By tearing apart the fabric, mechanical recycling creates shorter staple fibers, and that creates a less strong yarn product. The lack of strength causes issues like pilling. Because it’s generally blended with recycled polyester, it also has problems of inconsistency. These issues have prevented the massive growth of traditional mechanically recycled textiles.  But that can all be fixed. Yitzac has innovated again around the creation of a yarn system that allows us to produce stronger-than-traditional virgin yarns that are also higher performing than traditional synthetics. Their moisture management will meet or exceed the performance of the Adidas Climate Cool or Nike Dri Fit with no chemical finishing and all recycled and organic inputs. The COVID-19 global pandemic is forcing us to rethink our patterns of consumption and the way we produce things. Pamani: What’s the next big sustainability challenge in the circular fashion industry? Nichelson: We’re having it delivered to us inadvertently right now with the COVID-19 global pandemic. Within this moment so much loss is happening, but it’s also forcing us to rethink our patterns of consumption and the way we produce things. It’s bringing home the idea of how fragile our habitat is and how sacred our health is.  As we sit in our houses, either laid off or working from home with a lot more time on our hands, we’re looking inward at this incredible crisis. The whole world — but especially the tech, style and fashion industry — is collapsing in on itself right now because it’s unbalanced and totally unprepared for what’s to come. What’s necessary is not a revolution, but a resolution to change that resolves to do things differently as a species, not just an industry.  Pamani: Do you see opportunities for collaboration across different levels of production?  Nichelson: We’ve been doing presentations at textile exchanges and with some of the biggest companies in our space about a new way of looking at sustainability and collaboration. We are raising the bar. What we need to be striving for is fixing things — that’s regeneration, that’s true circular. We’re in this incredible moment, this inflection point for humanity, and constructive interference is what’s going to save us. We need it right now on a global basis. Are we going to come out of this into the real hunger games, or are we going to come out of this into a world ready to transform and willing to collaborate? I can tell you that we at Circular Systems are working night and day to do our part to make that collaboration a reality, and we invite everybody else to join us.  The above Q&A is an edited excerpt from the Bard MBA’s June 5 The Impact Report podcast. The Impact Report brings together students and faculty in Bard’s MBA in Sustainability program with leaders in business, sustainability and social entrepreneurship. Pull Quote The COVID-19 global pandemic is forcing us to rethink our patterns of consumption and the way we produce things. Contributors Katie Ellman Topics Circular Economy Food & Agriculture Fashion Food Waste Collective Insight The Sustainable MBA Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Credit:  Rawpixel.com

Originally posted here:
The future of the fashion industry requires innovative circular systems

Colorful, solar-powered island home is inspired by local fishermen’s buoys

February 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Colorful, solar-powered island home is inspired by local fishermen’s buoys

As one of the most scenic states in the country, Maine is an inspiration for many architects and designers. One architect has managed to use his family’s love of the idyllic state to build a beautiful, solar-powered home on a remote island off its coastline. Architect Noel Fedosh of LUNO Design Studio designed the Seal Cove Residence for his parents, whose love of color and whimsy was embedded into the quirky design. The 1,500-square-foot home is surrounded by the wilderness found on the remote island of Isle Au Haut. The island had been used for the family for years as a special place to enjoy camping vacations. While in the past they stayed in the local lighthouse bed & breakfast, the family decided it was finally time to build their own home to enjoy the picturesque location on a more permanent basis. Related: Israel’s striking LAHO House is wrapped with colorful reclaimed wood The parents are known for their colorful personalities and hobbies, which include solar eclipse chasing and collecting local art pieces . Tasking their son Noel with the design, they wanted to be sure the home represented their love of quirky art and vibrant colors. The resulting Seal Cove Residence manages to encompass not only the family’s unique personality but also some practical features that make the home sustainable . The L-shaped volume is topped with dual pitched roofs. The architect decided to use a natural, muted palette on the exterior so that he could add a few whimsical touches, such as the colorful patchwork siding that wraps around the home. The colorful tiles were actually inspired by Maine’s lobster industry. Local fishermen often hang their specially marked buoys on the side of their houses when they are not being used, creating a playful and personalized look to their homes. Using this as his guide, Noel created a vibrant siding that blended his parents’ love of color with vernacular architecture. Inside, bright colors abound in various forms. The interior layout follows an open plan with plenty of room for socializing. At the heart of the home is the large kitchen, which also features the same colorful wall tiles as the exterior. Bamboo flooring contrasts with the white walls. Fun accessories, such as netted lamps and an upside-down boat hanging from the ceiling, pay homage to the local fishing industry. The home was also designed to use both active and passive features to reduce its energy use. The rooftop was installed with a large solar array that generates ample energy for the home, including the solar water heater. Additionally, the home’s orientation was strategic to make the most of solar gain during the winter and minimize its impact in the summer. + LUNO Design Studio Via ArchDaily Photography by Trent Bell Photography via LUNO Design Studio

Read the original post: 
Colorful, solar-powered island home is inspired by local fishermen’s buoys

Remote tiny house in the Netherlands has a design inspired by foliage

December 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Remote tiny house in the Netherlands has a design inspired by foliage

When a client tasked the team behind Liberté Tiny Houses to create a mobile, minimalist home where she could reconnect with nature, they responded by building the Makatita — a 182-square-foot tiny home with a shape that was inspired by the organic form of a leaf. Located in a remote area of the Netherlands, the Makatita was specifically designed to let the owner enjoy her favorite passions of walking, camping and bushcraft. Accordingly, the architects behind Liberté began their design process by looking directly to Mother Nature for inspiration . Related: This gorgeous tiny home features a greenhouse and wooden pergola The tiny home was built with various organic shapes and materials found in nature, such as foliage, in mind. In fact, according to the designers, Gijsbert Schutten and Gijs Coumou, the home’s angular volume was inspired by the shape of a leaf. “The shape of the house was inspired by the lines that appear when you carefully fold a leaf,” Schutten explained. “The window shutters give the effect of the way light scatters through the forest.” Not just a nod to nature, the tiny home’s severely angled roofline enabled the structure to have ample space for a massive glass facade. Further embedding the home into its environment, the floor-to-ceiling glass panels nearly erase all boundaries between the indoors and outdoors. Inside and out, the structure is clad in pine , creating a warm, cabin setting. Although compact and minimalist, the living space feels open and welcoming. Throughout the interior, the unfinished wood walls, gray vinyl flooring and angular ceiling lend to the industrial design aesthetic. At the request of the homeowner, who prefers to sit on the open-air deck, there are minimal furnishings inside the house. The living space is comprised of a custom bench, which also holds the fireplace with firewood storage underneath, and a single stool made out of a salvaged tree stump. Next to the kitchen, a bespoke table folds out of the wall and can be used for dining or working. A simple wall ladder leads to a sleeping loft with a twin mattress. + Liberté Tiny Houses Via Dwell Images via Liberté Tiny Houses

Read the rest here:
Remote tiny house in the Netherlands has a design inspired by foliage

Enhance Your Garden With Bee-utiful Bee Houses

August 12, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Enhance Your Garden With Bee-utiful Bee Houses

Plenty of backyards are doubling as an enticing bed-and-breakfast. For … The post Enhance Your Garden With Bee-utiful Bee Houses appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read the rest here:
Enhance Your Garden With Bee-utiful Bee Houses

TREDJE NATUR proposes angled timber housing that meets UNs sustainability goals

June 13, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on TREDJE NATUR proposes angled timber housing that meets UNs sustainability goals

Copenhagen-based architectural firm TREDJE NATUR has unveiled an urban housing proposal that ticks all the right boxes for beautiful and sustainable design. Created to follow the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals — a blueprint of 17 goals ranging from affordable and clean energy to responsible consumption and production — TREDJE NATUR’s proposed mixed-use development is estimated to save 30 to 50 percent of carbon emissions compared to conventional housing construction. Named “New Angle” after the timber townhouses’ sharply pitched rooflines, the site-specific housing development emphasizes safe and low-carbon community living, biodiversity, flexibility and protection from the elements and traffic noise. Created as part of a feasibility study for the Copenhagen Metropolitan Area, New Angle comprises nearly 130,000 square feet of housing and a little over 160,000 square feet of office space. The development has been proposed for a commercial site sandwiched between two different motorways and a ring road. TREDJE NATUR’s design is a direct response to the site conditions, particularly the noise nuisances from surrounding traffic. The layout and shape of the houses create an inward-looking development that ensures optimized daylighting for all residents, ample green space and protection from traffic noise. Set on a parking plinth, the townhouses are arranged in an L-shaped ring with steeply sloped roofs angled toward the central common green space that can be used for urban gardening and recreation. The angle of the roof profiles not only shields residents from traffic noise, but also allows for integrated solar panels with maximum performance and rainwater collection systems. The renderings show the housing would be built primarily from timber with a strong emphasis on the outdoors and neighborly connection. Related: World’s first upcycled high-rise is proposed for Copenhagen “The CO2 savings happen through the building design, choice of materials, systematic solutions, focus on climate and biodiversity and overall by creating a framework for a strong community and a sustainable lifestyle,” explained the architects, who said the design is a more sustainable alternative to the conventional multistory building. “Apart from significant CO2 savings, calculations also show that the project is economically sustainable and can be constructed with low establishment costs compared to similar housing units.” + TREDJE NATUR Images via TREDJE NATUR

Go here to see the original:
TREDJE NATUR proposes angled timber housing that meets UNs sustainability goals

An itty-bitty tiny home on wheels is pretty in pink

January 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on An itty-bitty tiny home on wheels is pretty in pink

Designed by architect Joshua Woodsman of Pin-Up Houses , this bright pink tiny home is one of the most vibrant we’ve ever seen. Adding to its whimsical exterior, Magenta is a prefabricated tiny home on wheels that has a living space of just 66 square feet. However, within that tiny space are plenty of creature comforts that make it a fabulous home for living life on the road. According to the team from Pin-Up Houses, the vibrant Magenta is “a manifesto of temporary independent housing, against debt and mortgages.” Built on a flat trailer, the tiny home was designed for people who want to live on the road with a transportable but comfortable home. Accordingly, Magenta was built with extremely lightweight materials, waterproof plywood and spruce beams. Polystyrene insulation was installed on every side of the home, keeping it cozy and warm in the winter months and cool in summertime. A large window lets natural light into the living space. Related: ‘France’ is a $1,200 tiny house that snaps together in just 3 hours The interior space is compact, but the designers were able to outfit it with almost all of the basic amenities. There is a comfy sofa bed along with a small kitchenette that has a water tank, a gas cooker, a sink and plenty of secure drawers. A dining table with two chairs offers a nice place to eat and work. When nature calls, a humble chemical toilet was installed in a tiny water closet. Additionally, there is a heating stove that keeps the place nice and toasty. The home was built with a pitched roof, which gives the interior extra space for storage. Besides the custom built-in furniture , such as pull-out drawers under the sofa, there are multiple stretched nets hung on the walls for stashing away personal items. There is also a larger net that spans the length of the ceiling, adding a ton of space for storing sporting equipment, clothing, books and more. + Pin-Up Houses Images via Pin-Up Houses

Read more here:
An itty-bitty tiny home on wheels is pretty in pink

Cube Haus seeks to solve the housing crisis with affordable prefab homes

May 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Cube Haus seeks to solve the housing crisis with affordable prefab homes

Many large cities are struggling with severe housing issues, and one new startup is proposing an architectural solution. Developer Cube Haus – founded by Philip Bueno de Mesquita and Paul Tully – has commissioned four architects to design affordable, modular houses that can be configured to fit into empty urban areas of varying sizes. Working with different designers and architects, Cube Haus aims provide affordable housing in urban areas such as London. The architects’ proposals include a number of styles and designs, but all of the houses are based on a modular construction model , which enables them to adapt to the square footage limits of each site. Related: Largest-ever modular Gomos building to be completed in just a few months International architecture firm Adjaye Associates submitted a beautiful multi-story timber structure that can be adapted to fit on a typical London terrace. The interior has an open floor plan that offers the ultimate in flexibility, and a large patio area provides natural light. The structure could be built as high as adjacent buildings to blend in with the existing architecture. London-based designer Faye Toogood ‘s concept envisions a simple single-unit volume with dual-pitched roofs, clad either in galvanized steel or charred timber. A light wood interior with an open floor plan would be illuminated with natural light thanks to large vertical windows. London firm Carl Turner Architects submitted two designs for the project. The first is a one-story, extended bungalow with bright yellow skylights that flood the interior space with natural light. The second design is a two-story townhouse, clad in brick and timber and topped with two separate pitched roofs that face two different directions. An open-air terrace between the roofs can serve as a rooftop garden or social space. Lastly, Skene Catling de la Peña ‘s proposal includes a stone-clad home with a timber interior . At the heart of the interior design is a vertical, green-tiled chimney with a cast-iron fireplace. The Cube Haus project is committed to using these five innovative prototypes to create a portfolio of varied building types that can be scaled to size for larger, multi-family spaces or single-unit use. All of the buildings will be constructed with cross-laminated timber with components manufactured off-site in the UK. + Cube Haus + Adjaye Associates + Faye Toogood + Skene Catling de la Peña + Carl Turner Architects Via Dezeen Images via Cube Haus

Here is the original: 
Cube Haus seeks to solve the housing crisis with affordable prefab homes

Designers envision innovative affordable housing for Sydney

May 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Designers envision innovative affordable housing for Sydney

The Sydney Affordable Housing Challenge , organized by Bee Breeders , calls for ideas that try to solve the affordable housing shortage in Sydney. The competition attracted worldwide talent as designers attempted to create innovative solutions. Many of the successful entries offered more than just housing — they designed spaces that would build communities. Bridging Affordable Housing, the winning entry, intersperses  green-roof prefab housing units throughout the city. The project involves “a simple module : a structural bridge pier with decking that contains prefabricated housing units topped by a green roof.” Instead of stacking the units, the team designed the houses above the city’s streets like bridges. The second prize winner is “Newborn in the Crevice”, which combines housing units with public spaces in a structural grid. The simple vertical arrangement makes the design adaptable to population needs and economic conditions. Related: Tiny new flat-packed off-grid homes offer affordable housing breakthrough The third place project, TOD and Waterfront Housing, envisions “stacked prefabricated units floating within the bays of  Sydney .” It creates  waterfront  housing and commercial spaces and introduces a rail system to reduce dependence on cars. Finally, The BB Green Award winner was project Water Smart Home Sydney, which aims to sustainably harness energy from several sources, through both passive and active systems. The project authors said they hope their design helps to “…contribute ideas that could bring desirable living within reach of the majority of the population and lift the burden of housing affordability for young people and low-income families.” + Sydney Affordable Housing Challenge Via Archdaily

Here is the original: 
Designers envision innovative affordable housing for Sydney

Santa and the ‘Shrooms: The real story behind the "design" of Christmas

December 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Santa and the ‘Shrooms: The real story behind the "design" of Christmas

When we think of Christmas in the United States, we invariably think of Santa Claus — a man in a red suit and pointy hat with white furry trim and tall black boots, and his accessories, a bag of goodies in a sleigh pulled through the sky by a team of eight flying reindeer. And it’s a clear case of the clothes making the man, for a Santa in any other outfit would most definitely not still be Santa. (Does a fat, bearded, white-haired guy in cargo shorts and a Metallica t-shirt make you think of Christmas?) But when you think about it, it’s a pretty special outfit, no? Santa’s pretty much the only one who wears anything like it — a baggy suit with fur trim isn’t exactly stylish these days, and it wasn’t when Santa made his first appearance, either. His last known precursor, Father Christmas, wore a long red robe, sometimes with trim and sometimes without, like a cardinal — reflecting the link drawn between him and the historic Saint Nicholas, a Turkish cardinal in the 14th century who was known for his kindness to children. But the pants? And the hat? And the boots? They’re nowhere to be found on him. Popular legend has it that Santa himself, not to mention his outfit, was designed by Coca Cola, making his first appearance in their early-20th century ads and defining him for the ages by sheer force of commercial might. There’s a grain of truth in this: His generous shape and rosy cheeks came at the whimsy of Haddon Sundblom, the illustrator of so many of Coke’s well-loved ads from that period. Before Sundblom’s illustrations, Santa was commonly depicted as more of a gnome-like little man (editorial cartoonist Thomas Nast drew some of the best-known early dedications of him), often skinny and a little scary — but even then, wearing the same clothes he wears now. So the question is, where did that outfit come from? Where did Santa get such a unique sense of sartorial élan? The answer, according to anthropological research from recent decades, lies way further back than even Coke can be found. The roots of Santa’s style, and his bag of goodies, sleigh, reindeer, bizarre midnight flight, distinctive chimney-based means of entry into the home, and even the way we decorate our houses at Christmas, seem to lead all the way back to the ancestral traditions of a number of indigenous arctic circle dwellers — the Kamchadales and the Koryaks of Siberia, specifically. (So it’s true — Santa really does come from the North Pole!) And like so many other fantastical tales, it all originated with some really intense ‘shrooms. On the night of the winter solstice, a Koryak shaman would gather several hallucinogenic mushrooms called amanita muscaria, or fly agaric in English, and them to launch himself into a spiritual journey to the tree of life (a large pine), which lived by the North Star and held the answer to all the village’s problems from the previous year. Fly agaric is the red mushroom with white spots that we see in fairy tale illustrations, old Disney movies, and (if you’re old enough to remember) Super Mario Brothers video games and all the Smurfs cartoons. They are seriously toxic, but they become less lethal when dried out. Conveniently, they grow most commonly under pine trees (because their spores travel exclusively on pine seeds), so the shaman would often hang them on lower branches of the pine they were growing under to dry out before taking them back to the village. As an alternative, he would put them in a sock and hang them over his fire to dry. Is this starting to sound familiar? Another way to remove the fatal toxins from the ‘shrooms was to feed them to reindeer, who would only get high from them — and then pee, with their digestive systems having filtered out most of the toxins, making their urine safe for humans to drink and get a safer high that way. Reindeer happen to love fly agarics and eat them whenever they can, so a good supply of magic pee was usually ready and waiting all winter. In fact, the reindeer like fly agarics so much that they would eat any snow where a human who had drank ‘shroom-laced urine had relieved himself, and thus the circle would continue. When the shaman went out to gather the mushrooms, he would wear an red outfit with either white trim or white dots, in honor of the mushroom’s colors. And because at that time of year the whole region was usually covered in deep snow, he, like everyone, wore tall boots of reindeer skin that would by then be blackened from exposure. He’d gather the tree-dried fly agarics and some reindeer urine in a large sack, then return home to his yurt (the traditional form of housing for people of this region at that time), where some of the higher-ups of the village would have gathered to join in the solstice ceremony. But how would he get into a yurt whose door was blocked by several feet of snow? He’d climb up to the roof with his bag of goodies, go to the hole in the center of the roof that acted as a chimney, and slide down the central pole that held the yurt up over the fireplace. Then he’d pass out a few ‘shrooms to each guest, and some might even partake of some of the ones that had been hung over the fire. Clearly, this idea of using the chimney to get in and pass out the magic mushrooms (and other goodies) had sticking power. Interestingly, even as late as Victorian times in England, the traditional symbol of chimney sweeps was a fly agaric mushroom — and many early Christmas cards featured chimney sweeps with fly agarics, though no explanation of why was offered. Interestingly, in addition to inducing hallucinations, the mushrooms stimulate the muscular system so strongly that those who eat them take on temporarily superhuman strength, in the same way we might be affected by a surge of adrenaline in a life-or-death situation. And the effect is the same for animals. So any reindeer who’d had a tasty mushroom snack or a little yellow snow would become literally high and mighty, prancing around and often jumping so high they looked like they were flying. And at the same time, the high would make humans feel like they were flying, too, and the reindeer were flying through space. So by now you can see where this is going: The legend had it that the shaman and the reindeer would fly to the north star (which sits directly over the north pole) to retrieve the gifts of knowledge, which they would then distribute to the rest of the village. It seems that these traditions were carried down into Great Britain by way of the ancient druids, whose spiritual practices had taken on elements that had originated much farther north. Then, in the inevitable way that different cultures influence one another due to migration and intermarriage, these stories got mixed with certain Germanic and Nordic myths involving Wotan (the most powerful Germanic god), Odin (his Nordic counterpart) or another great god going on a midnight winter solstice ride, chased by devils, on an eight-legged horse. The exertion of the chase would make flecks of red and white blood and foam fall from the horse’s mouth to the ground, where the next year amanita mushrooms would appear. Apparently over time, this European story of a horse with eight legs, united with the ancient Arctic circle story of reindeer prancing and flying around on the same night, melted together into eight prancing, flying reindeer. That story then crossed the pond to the New World with the early English settlers, and got an injection of Dutch traditions involving the Turkish St. Nicholas (who came to be called Sinterklaas by small Dutch children) from the Dutch colonialists — and found immortality in its current form in early 20th-century America, with Clement Clark Moore’s famous poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas.” Before this poem hit the press, different immigrant groups around the U.S. each had their own different versions of the Santa Claus legend. Then in the 1930s, Coca Cola’s ad campaign gave Santa his sizable girth and sent him back around the world. And so in that spirit, a merry Christmas to all who celebrate it! + Fly Agaric

Read more from the original source:
Santa and the ‘Shrooms: The real story behind the "design" of Christmas

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 13268 access attempts in the last 7 days.