An off-grid cabin on a remote island is inspired by Japanese design

September 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on An off-grid cabin on a remote island is inspired by Japanese design

Tasmania-based firm Maguire + Devine Architects has created a gorgeous Japanese-inspired, off-grid tiny cabin tucked away into a remote island off the coast of Tasmania. The 301-square-foot home is designed to operate completely off the grid and comes complete with solar panels and a rainwater collection system. The tiny cabin is located on 99 acres of Bruny Island, a tranquil destination just off the Tasmanian coast. Using minimalist design features, the architects set about to create a soothing retreat that would evoke a sense of serenity and have a strong connection to the surrounding landscape. Related: This off-grid cabin in the pristine Alaskan wilderness can only be reached by sea or air The compact cabin is clad in bush fire-resistant wood siding at its base and enclosed on one side with zincalume metal siding, which is also used for the sloped roof. The shed-like roofline adds character to the design, but it’s also a strategic feature that allows more space for solar panels . Taking advantage of the location, the architects positioned the cabin to open up to the east and west so that the homeowners could enjoy early morning and afternoon sunshine. According to the architects, the design for the off-grid cabin was inspired by their client’s love of Japanese minimalist design. “Our brief was to capture that love and design a building as a piece of furniture with everything she needs built in,” the firm said. “The only furniture allowed was a low table and mattress on the sleeping loft.” Inside, the living space, which is clad in light-colored wooden panels, is bright and airy, illuminated with natural light from a large skylight. Two large sliding doors open up to two wooden decks facing east and west, creating a seamless connection between the inside and the outside. The low-lying platforms were built without railings, so nothing obstructs the views of the surrounding wilderness. To provide the ultimate retreat experience, one of the decks includes a recessed tub for the resident to relax while watching the sun go down. The two large sliding doors are made out of transparent glazing, another nod to Japanese design . “Translucent glass in the sliding doors references the light qualities of Japanese rice-paper screens, creating a sense of enclosure and privacy at night, while encouraging the occupant to open them during the day,” the architects explained. “They also prevent birds, including the endangered swift parrot, from attempting to fly through the building and striking the glass.” Located at the back of the home is a compact kitchen, equipped with a Nectre Bakers oven that is not only used for cooking but also supplies sustainable heating in the colder months. The bedroom is located in a sleeping loft accessible by ladder. An elevated seating area with a large window provides the most stunning views of the island. + Maguire + Devine Architects Via Dwell Photography by Rob Maver via Maguire + Devine Architects

See original here: 
An off-grid cabin on a remote island is inspired by Japanese design

DIY fall decor using upcycled items from thrift stores

September 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on DIY fall decor using upcycled items from thrift stores

Fall is a great time to bust out new decorations, but you don’t have to break the bank to make your house stand out. Making DIY fall decor is a great way to save money and help the environment at the same time. From floating shelves to fall clothing accessories, here are eight autumn decorations you can make from common thrift store items or materials in your craft drawer. Cake Stand Pumpkin Display Nothing says fall like fresh pumpkins . You can proudly display these seasonal staples ( before you cook them up for dinner ) using an old cake stand, or you can build your own from old plates and a candlestick holder. If you are building one, simply mount the candlestick holder between two plates and paint them as desired. Glue down the plates to hold everything securely in place. You can build as many of these as you like, using different sizes holders to vary the heights. Related: Fall decorating ideas Floating Bookshelves Floating bookshelves can add a cozy and mysterious feel to a room, and you can build these imaginative holders with a few old hardcovers and a metal bracket. With a floating bookshelf, the bottom book holds everything in place while concealing the support bracket. Once completed, the shelf makes it appear like the books are floating on their own. For this project, all you need are a few metal brackets and some hardcover books. Start by attaching the bottom of the hardcover book to a metal bracket with a piece of fabric fastener. The fabric fastener should be attached so that it holds the bottom cover in place. The rest of the hardcover book should rest on top of the bracket. Then screw the bracket in place and install the bottom book. You can stack multiple books on top of the first one, just make sure the weight isn’t more than the metal bracket can handle. Stagger as many of these floating bookshelves on your wall to complete the look, and top each with your favorite knick-knacks. Sweater Pumpkins Cable knit sweaters make great DIY pumpkins that won’t rot if you forget about them. You can make these adorable fall decorations with a cable knit sweater, stuffing, yarn, twine and a sewing needle. Start by cutting the sweater in half at the armpits. Then, use the needle and yarn to create a running stitch along the bottom of the fabric, pulling it tight as you work around. With the bottom closed, fill the fabric with your stuffing material, leaving around 5 inches of sweater on top. The stuffing should turn the sweater into a rounded shape. Close the sweater with another running stitch around the top and add a piece of twine for a stem. Lastly, run some twine in sections from the top of the sweater to the bottom to create ridges, pulling tight for a more pumpkin-like appearance. Related: Front porch decorating for fall Basket Storage We could all use some extra storage around the house. Instead of buying new plastic totes, you can convert an old basket to serve as decorative storage space for all the seasonal items taking over your house, like blankets, scarves and boots. All you have to do is take an old basket and repaint it a solid color to match your existing decor. You can also paint a pattern on the basket to really make it stand out. Attach thick rope to the top of the basket to serve as handles, making a basket full of scarves, coats or blankets easier to move from the living room to the laundry room. Fall Clothing There are plenty of things around the house or at your local thrift store that you can upcycle and wear in the cooler fall weather. If you have any sweaters that are beyond repair, you can cut off the sleeves and use them as leg warmers, knit socks or tall boot socks. You can even make several pairs using just one sweater, depending on the size. If you have a blanket that has seen better days, cutting it just right can turn it into your new favorite scarf. The key is to getting the right dimensions. If you have another scarf on hand, use it as a reference point. Traditional scarves are anywhere between 55 and 82 inches long and 5 to 10 inches wide. Depending on the condition and size of the blanket, you should be able to get multiple scarves out of one piece. Seasonal Throw Pillows Take your love for fall to the next level by making throw pillow covers with old sweaters or flannel shirts. Start by cutting off the sleeves of the sweater or flannel, carefully following the seams. Then, put the pillow inside the shirt to get an idea of the best placement. Try to center the pillows with the pockets or buttons, which will lend these covers extra charm. Trim around the pillow, leaving an inch of fabric all the way around. Flip the fabric inside out and sew all of the sides together. Avoid sewing shut the buttons, as this is where you will insert the pillow. Once everything is sewed together, turn the shirt the right side out, unbutton the front, insert the pillow and re-button the cover. If your top of choice doesn’t have buttons, sew in buttons or a zipper on one side of the pillow cover. Related: Refresh your furnishings for fall Mason Jar Pumpkins You can make super cute DIY fall decor using old glass jars. All you need are the glass jars, non-toxic paint , twine and some faux leaves and corks for the stems. Start by painting the lids brown and the jars a dark orange. Once they have dried, screw the lids on the jars and use a piece of twine to tie around the jar just below the base of the lids. Add faux leaves and corks to the top of the lids, and feel free to paint on some fun Jack O’Lantern faces as well. Patio Lights Turning old tin cans into patio lights is a lot easier than you might think. All you need are some snips or shears, a hole punch, paint and tea lights. Start by removing any labels from the cans and cleaning them thoroughly. Use a strong hole punch to create patterns on the cans and paint them a warm fall color. If you do not have a hole punch on hand, you can carefully use a hammer and nail to create the same effect. Simply insert the tea light into the cans and place them around your patio, porch or even indoors. Images via Kamelia Hayati ,  John M. P. Knox , Sarah Dorweiler , Max Conrad , Shutterstock

See the original post here: 
DIY fall decor using upcycled items from thrift stores

5 Energy-Saving Tips for Colder Weather

September 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on 5 Energy-Saving Tips for Colder Weather

The days are getting shorter and winter will be here … The post 5 Energy-Saving Tips for Colder Weather appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read more here:
5 Energy-Saving Tips for Colder Weather

A 6-foot-tall man lives comfortably in this custom tiny home

September 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A 6-foot-tall man lives comfortably in this custom tiny home

We’ve seen tiny homes built for a number of distinct uses, such as homes for veterans , students and families. But one “large” group has been left out of the movement — until now. The Light Haus is a tiny home on wheels custom-built for a couple, including a man who is over six feet tall. Designed by Vina Lustado from Sol Haus Design , the light-filled home has an interior height of 6’8″. Going vertical didn’t mean sacrificing on space or style; the house has two separate offices, tons of storage space, a luxurious bathroom with a rainfall shower and even special access for the couple’s cat. Anna and Kevin approached Vina with their hopes of finding a tiny home on wheels that would be comfortable for Kevin’s height, but still provide the amenities of a traditional home. By creating a height clearance of 6’8″, there would be ample room for him to stand up, but that wasn’t sufficient when it came to creating a spacious living area. Therefore, the solution was to extend the structure horizontally to 24 feet long, which added much-needed space. The living space is flooded with natural light thanks to an abundance of windows, especially the multiple clerestory windows that wrap around the home’s upper level. The layout has a central living area with a compact kitchen on one side. On the adjacent wall, stairs with hidden storage lead up to the sleeping loft. Again, space efficiency was essential here, so there is a whopping 4’6″ of space above the loft. Related: This off-grid, prefab tiny cabin in Michigan fits a family of five A light color palette and custom-made, multi-functional furniture give the space a fresh, modern aesthetic. Ample storage in every nook and cranny helps keep the space clutter-free. Adding to the healthy atmosphere is the fact that the tiny home was built with non-toxic materials . + Vina Lustado Via Tiny House Talk Images via Vina’s Tiny House

Go here to read the rest: 
A 6-foot-tall man lives comfortably in this custom tiny home

Shipping containers inspire a light-filled musicians home

September 4, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Shipping containers inspire a light-filled musicians home

When a couple tapped Coates Design Architects to design a house that could accommodate their baby grand piano, they were also intrigued by the idea of using shipping containers to do the job. In response, the American architecture studio researched cargotecture  and settled on a cost-effective solution that combined traditional wood framing with a “container-like” design. Located on Washington’s Bainbridge Island, the Musician’s House features a layout optimized for acoustics as well as natural ventilation and daylighting. Completed in 2014, the Musician’s House spans an area of 2,775 square feet across two floors. “The couple was intrigued with the idea of building a container house from real containers ,” said Coates Design Architects in a project statement. “We researched the idea — searching for a ‘sweet spot’ that could utilize containers in a manner that required as little alteration as possible, taking advantage of their natural structural integrity. The alternative was to force them into a different role that requires significant alterations. Considerable research was spent on the topic … only to arrive at the more cost-effective solution of traditional wood framing.” Despite their findings, the architects designed the home with a “container-like” aesthetic using industrial corrugated metal cladding combined with natural materials , including a variety of timber and even a green roof above the entry vestibule. Inside, the Musician’s House comprises a spacious master en suite on the ground floor along with a kitchen and a double-height living and dining area. The upper level houses a guest bedroom suite, workshop, covered outdoor decks and a loft/music room with a connecting studio space. Related: Architect turns four shipping containers into an affordable and eco-friendly home In contrast to the industrial cladding, the interiors are bright, colorful and playful. Full-height windows, particularly around the double-height living space, stream in natural light, and select art and furnishings add bright pops of color to the modern home, from the yellow accent wall behind the stairs to the multicolored seating in the eat-in kitchen. + Coates Design Architects Images via Coates Design Architects

See original here:
Shipping containers inspire a light-filled musicians home

Do You Have Hazardous Waste in Your House?

August 29, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Do You Have Hazardous Waste in Your House?

If you’ve painted your house, refinished your floors, or switched … The post Do You Have Hazardous Waste in Your House? appeared first on Earth911.com.

Go here to read the rest:
Do You Have Hazardous Waste in Your House?

The Edge of the Rainforest holiday home stands true to its name

August 28, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Edge of the Rainforest holiday home stands true to its name

First constructed in 2003, the RLC Residence was simply known as a holiday home , a place for family and friends to gather for leisurely vacations in the lush greenery of Noosa National Park on the Sunshine Coast of Queensland, Australia . It was lovely and luxurious but lacked a connection with its idyllic surroundings. MIM Design of Melbourne recently renovated the house, also called the Edge of the Rainforest, to bond it with the forest and sea, creating a sublime sanctuary in a magnificent tropical setting. In order to strengthen the holiday home’s bond with nature, the remodel centered around making the outdoors meld with the indoors, creating an entity that inspires tranquility. “The residence’s existing floor plan lacked connection to the rainforest and ocean , missing the sentiments of relaxation from nature’s surrounding abundance,” Miriam Fanning, principal at MIM Design, said. “Through clever planning and reconfiguration of each room, a sanctuary has been created.” Related: Australia’s Glasshouse blends minimalism with a tropical resort-like twist The interior lets the vibrant surrounding greenery take center stage, with navy blue accents, stark white woodwork, silky marble surfaces and calming smoked oak floors. What were once conventionally defined rooms have been remodeled to create a breezy flow through all the levels of the home. The kitchen is now much larger, and the basement was transformed into an entertainment space to be enjoyed by both kids and adults. The icing on the proverbial cake of the upgrade is a breathtaking floor devoted to an enchanting master bedroom and en suite. A freestanding tub in the bathroom inspires long baths for mental and physical relaxation and contemplation. The glass-enclosed shower maintains the theme of transparency, and the vertical pattern of the bathroom’s subway tiling references the impressive height of the adjacent palm trees . To further celebrate the incredible foliage that envelops the house, the glass kitchen backsplash provides a clear, exhilarating view of the forest . Throughout the home, all the windows are bordered in black, making each pane appear like a prize-winning photograph of palm branches, plant life and the sea. Shutters filter light from outside and let breezes flow through the house. A refined boardwalk leads directly from the home into the nearby rainforest . All in all, this 6,997-square-foot holiday home is an inspirational haven that stirs Utopian fantasies. + MIM Design Via Dwell Images via Andrew Richey

See the original post:
The Edge of the Rainforest holiday home stands true to its name

This striking, gorge-inspired Sydney home celebrates outdoor play

August 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This striking, gorge-inspired Sydney home celebrates outdoor play

Soaring ceilings and natural light define the Iron Maiden House, a contemporary home that pays tribute to the local site context in Sydney’s lower North Shore. Designed by Darlington-based CplusC Architectural Workshop , the Iron Maiden House was created for a family of five and offers generously sized rooms that spill out to outdoor-facing areas. The dwelling’s asymmetrical mountain-like forms mimic the appearance of a natural gorge and even feature a series of linear ponds that cut lengthwise through the center of the home. Covering an area of 3,089 square feet, the Iron Maiden House consists of metal-clad angular volumes that the architects describe as their modern take on the gable houses typically found throughout the region. A solar study determined the orientation as well as the overall layout of the home to fill the interior with natural light. Meanwhile, the architects also added flowering creeping plants to the exterior for seasonal variation and to heighten the home’s likeness to a natural gorge. The interiors feature cathedral -like spaces with tall ceilings and white walls. Massive walls of glass and the ponds that bisect the house bring the outdoors in. The main living spaces—which also flow from indoors to out—as well as a guest en-suite bedroom, study and swimming pool are located on the ground floor while the master suite, a lounge and three additional bedrooms can be found upstairs. Related: Glass elements dramatically open up a solar-powered Sydney home “The home aims to elevate everyday activities,” note the architects. “Occupants are encouraged to pause and enjoy the view through a large window near the spiral stair and generous stair treads which meet nearby walls, forming a place to sit. Each room has a view through green space into different parts of the house. The sophisticated use of levels within the home creates distinct yet akin spaces.” The Iron Maiden House was also shortlisted in the 2018 World Architecture Festival and Houses Awards. + CplusC Architectural Workshop Via ArchDaily Images by Murray Fredericks and Michael Lassman

The rest is here:
This striking, gorge-inspired Sydney home celebrates outdoor play

Bioclimatic home optimizes thermal comfort and energy efficiency in Cancun

August 22, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Bioclimatic home optimizes thermal comfort and energy efficiency in Cancun

International architecture firm sanzpont has designed a bioclimatic home sculpted by site conditions in Cancun , Mexico. Currently under development, the single-family home — dubbed the T&N Villa — will occupy prime waterfront property within the subdivision “La Laguna 1” in Puerto Cancun. The contemporary building’s sculptural form is largely informed by the architects’ varied site analyses, which include thermal radiation studies and data collection on climate to determine optimal massing and orientation for energy efficiency. The proposed T&N Villa spans 3,414 square feet over two habitable floors, in addition to a basement parking pad and accessible rooftop. The street-facing front facade will comprise two main volumes — the left features a green wall backed by wooden ribs, while the right volume is predominately finished in white vinyl paint. The water-facing rear consists of white vinyl-painted walls that jut outward to provide protection against the sun. Large expanses of glazing will be treated with UV protection, and the windows at the front facade will be tinted shades of green for extra privacy. Non-reflective silver roller blinds will offer added sun protection. Using careful climate analyses that cover the area’s temperature, humidity levels, wind speed, solar incidence and even cloudiness over time, the architects devised a bioclimatic design to achieve thermal comfort year-round. Comfort is also ensured through careful placement of windows to facilitate cross ventilation and the best natural lighting, while the architecture was also modified with solar shades, like louvers and a “Serge Ferrari” roll-over solar protection membrane, to reduce unwanted solar gain and lessen dependence on air conditioning. A green roof also provides an additional layer of insulation. Related: Soak Up the Sun at Casa de las Olas’ Solar Powered Eco-Escape in Tulum “In order to improve the thermal comfort and the efficiency of the energetic demand, it was decided that the façades would be composed of mainly solid materials, with very little openings,” the architects explained. “Sun protection and privacy is resolved with narrow vertical windows, a green wall, walls with air chambers with thermal insulation and a series of louvers to prevent solar radiation inside the house, creating an emphasis on verticality.” + sanzpont

See the original post:
Bioclimatic home optimizes thermal comfort and energy efficiency in Cancun

Breath Easy: Reduce Indoor Air Pollution

August 21, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Breath Easy: Reduce Indoor Air Pollution

Although it may be counterintuitive, indoor air is commonly two … The post Breath Easy: Reduce Indoor Air Pollution appeared first on Earth911.com.

Here is the original post:
Breath Easy: Reduce Indoor Air Pollution

« Previous PageNext Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 720 access attempts in the last 7 days.