Do Metal Roofs Save Energy?

April 17, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco

The popularity of metal roofs has soared in recent years … The post Do Metal Roofs Save Energy? appeared first on Earth911.com.

Original post:
Do Metal Roofs Save Energy?

Sustainable Roofing Buyers’ Guide

April 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco

For most people, buying a new roof is one of … The post Sustainable Roofing Buyers’ Guide appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read more:
Sustainable Roofing Buyers’ Guide

President Trump attacks wind turbines, claims the noise causes cancer

April 5, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on President Trump attacks wind turbines, claims the noise causes cancer

Speaking at an event for the National Republican Congressional Committee, President Trump took a shot at wind power as he continues his war against renewable energy. In a surprising statement, Trump claimed that having a wind turbine near your home will devalue the property and cause cancer. “If you have a windmill anywhere near your house, congratulations, your house just went down 75 percent in value,” Trump told his fellow Republicans. “And they say the noise causes cancer. You tell me that one, okay? Rerrrr rerrrr!” The allegation that wind turbines cause cancer is simply false. According to EcoWatch , some studies have looked into the issue but have found no link between wind turbines and health-related issues; this includes strokes and heart attacks. Simply put, the only real issue with wind turbines is that they might be a minor annoyance and create about as much noise as traffic. Trump also doubled down on his previous claims that wind power results in massive bird deaths. Although wind turbines do kill birds on an annual basis, they do so at a much lower rate than traditional energy sources. A study conducted in 2009 discovered that fossil fuel facilities kill almost 15 times the amount of birds as wind turbines. If wind turbines do not cause cancer or kill birds on a large scale, then why is Trump so against them? Turns out, Trump has a history with fighting wind turbines that dates back to 2006. At the time, Trump had purchased some land in Scotland that he intended to turn into a golf course. A nearby farm ruined those plans when it decided to put up a wind turbine. Trump sued the farmers but lost in court. Trump’s stance against wind power also sits nicely with the Republican party’s policy on energy. His administration has initiated plans to boost fossil fuel production in the United States and has made it clear that renewable energy is not high on its priority list. Exactly how this will affect the future of wind turbines in the United States is unclear. Via EcoWatch Image via Pixabay

Read the original: 
President Trump attacks wind turbines, claims the noise causes cancer

Modern farmhouse-inspired dwelling in Melbourne is largely self-sufficient

March 29, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Modern farmhouse-inspired dwelling in Melbourne is largely self-sufficient

Desirous of a “low-tech, country life,” a couple reached out to Brunswick-based architectural firm MRTN Architects for the design of the Trentham Long House, a contemporary home inspired by the traditional farming structures that once inhabited the Australian countryside. Located north of Melbourne, the dwelling consists of an elongated structure topped with a gable roof. To meet the client’s brief for a largely self-sufficient home, the architects optimized the thermal performance of the build, taking advantage of passive solar principles and installing a high-efficiency fireplace for supplementary heating in winter. Built for a couple that often hosts their extended family, the single-story home spans an area of 2,787 square feet and is oriented east to west. The main living spaces are located on the west side and include four bedrooms evenly split on either side of the central open-plan living area with a dining space and kitchen. Full-height glazing with custom sliding screens open the living space to an outdoor terrace. “The building’s muted material palette subtly and effectively reflects the surrounding environment, echoing buildings of the past,” MRTN Architects explained. “The spotted gum exterior cladding is left to naturally patina , relying on its innate aptitude to develop character and camouflage over time. The owners are not extravagant or wasteful people, they live with a careful intent behind all they do and their family is very important to them. The house is largely self-sufficient, heating costs are low, cooling costs are non-existent and the extended family can be accommodated at all times.” Related: A tiny, rustic, off-grid cabin sits on vast 300 acres in Australia The client’s son, a builder, constructed the project with finishes and materials selected on the basis of their durability, thermal performance and cost-effectiveness. To ensure energy efficiency, the architects kept glazed openings along the south facade at a minimum while roof overhangs and custom sliding screens help protect against unwanted solar gain. Stone tile set on a concrete slab provides  thermal mass . Moreover, all rainwater runoff from the roof is captured and stored in large water tanks and reused for all the home’s water needs and for irrigation. + MRTN Architects Photography by Anthony Basheer via MRTN Architects

See the original post here: 
Modern farmhouse-inspired dwelling in Melbourne is largely self-sufficient

Solar-powered eco hotel in Portugal offers surfers ocean views from green-roofed bungalows

March 29, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered eco hotel in Portugal offers surfers ocean views from green-roofed bungalows

The surf is always up at this gorgeous eco hotel along Portugal’s Silver Coast. Just steps away from the beach, Noah Surf House  has everything you need for a rad surf getaway. The boutique hotel, which is partially made out of reclaimed materials, was designed on some serious sustainable principles , boasting solar panels, energy-efficient systems and appliances, a rainwater harvesting system and even an organic garden that provides delicious meals to guests. Located in the area of Santa Cruz in northwest Portugal, the eco hotel is tucked into a rising hill just a short stroll from the beach. The project is made up of various buildings, but the most popular part of the complex is a restaurant that overlooks the ocean. Guests can enjoy a wonderful meal of organic fruits and veggies grown in the hotel’s garden, which operates on a “closed feeding cycle” with a little help from the hotel’s 12 chickens. Related: The Truck Surf Hotel is a traveling retreat that hits the best surf spots in Europe and Africa The guests rooms are comprised of various boho-style bungalows, most offering stunning ocean views through private decks. The rooms range in size, offering everything from dorm-style with bunk beds to private luxury bungalows that boast fireplaces and private terraces with outdoor showers. Although the setting itself is quite impressive, guests can rest assured that they are also staying in a very eco-conscious retreat. The hotel’s construction used quite a bit of reclaimed materials , such as old bricks recovered from industrial coal furnaces to clad the walls. Additionally, the buildings are filled with discarded items that have been given new life as decoration for the hotel. Plumbing pipes are incorporated into lamps, lockers from an old summer camp are available for storage and an old water deposit is now a fireplace in the reception area. The construction of the hotel implemented various sustainable materials as well, such as cork as thermic insulation. The bungalows are also topped with native plants . For energy, solar panels generate almost enough energy for the all of the hotel’s hot water needs. When there is an abundance of energy, it is used to heat the pool as well as the radiant flooring in the guest rooms in winter. LED lighting throughout the hotel and energy-efficient appliances help reduce the building’s energy use. Noah Surf House also has a rain water collection system that redirects water to a well to be used in toilet flushing, garden watering and linen laundering. + Noah Surf House Via Uncrate Images via Noah Surf House

Read the original:
Solar-powered eco hotel in Portugal offers surfers ocean views from green-roofed bungalows

A series of cylindrical volumes break up this modernist home in Mexico

March 27, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A series of cylindrical volumes break up this modernist home in Mexico

Merida-based architecture firm Garrido Lizarraga Arquitectos has unveiled a gorgeous,  modernist home comprised of a low-lying structure interspersed by several cylindrical volumes. Marked by clean, simple lines, white cladding and natural light, the contemporary House O + I is 1,776 square feet of pure, unadulterated sophistication. Located in Merida, Mexico, the family residence is set on an expansive plot of land, which inspired the incredible design. To take advantage of the building site, the architects opted to create an elongated, low-lying volume with an open floor plan. This strategy, according to the design firm, would allow the home owners to enjoy multiple perspectives of the natural surroundings from virtually any angle. Related: Award-winning Palm Springs home embraces the California climate in sustainable style The two-bedroom home is clad in smooth, all-white surfaces, both on the interior and exterior, that contrast with the existing rustic environment. Additionally, the home’s modernist aesthetic is enhanced with long, angular cutouts and various cylindrical volumes that rise up over the main structure’s roof line. The cylindrical volumes separate the home according to use, with one side housing the communal areas and the other side containing the two bedrooms. Clean, simple lines define the interior space, which, like the exterior, is clad in smooth, white surfaces. However, to create a bit of contrast, the architects used chukum, a limestone-based, red-hued stucco mixed with resin from chukum trees, to bring in hints of nature into the interior, from accent walls to bathroom features. At the heart of the home is the south-facing living room that leads out to the swimming pool through a series of sliding glass doors. This expansive outdoor space is enclosed with a textured, earthen wall that contrasts nicely with the all-white house. From the large terrace area, a “floating” staircase leads to a rooftop terrace that overlooks the surroundings. + Garrido Lizarraga Arquitectos Via World Architecture Photography by Diego Ayuso via Garrido Lizarraga Arquitectos

Read the rest here: 
A series of cylindrical volumes break up this modernist home in Mexico

Rammed concrete home in Portugal boasts passive design features and a green roof

March 26, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Rammed concrete home in Portugal boasts passive design features and a green roof

Portuguese firm  Atelier 1111 has unveiled a gorgeous home designed to strategically blend into the rural region of Grândola in southern Portugal. The Cottage House is an angular design embedded into a small hillside, putting part of the home underneath the arid landscape. This technique provides the house with a strong thermal envelope, which — along with additional passive cooling strategies such as a green roof and thickened stone walls — boosts energy efficiency. Using the idyllic setting as inspiration for the design, the exterior of the home is clad in a rammed concrete, which gives the exterior a textured, neutral color that blends in with the arid soil. According to the architects, the rammed concrete was part of the structure’s many passive features, which also include a green roof and thick, insulative walls. Related: This breezy, green-roofed home in Singapore embraces nature from all angles “Thermal comfort was one of our biggest concerns, especially in the summer, because it is a region with high temperatures,” the architects explained. “We avoid mechanical systems, because we have a green roof and considerable thick walls.” Although angular in form, the contemporary home manages to subtly and respectfully blend in with its surroundings. Using the rolling topography to their advantage, the architects created a main open-air corridor that weaves through the structure, leading to the interior living space as well as various cutouts that frame the incredible views. Throughout the interior, the home’s walls and ceilings are also made out of concrete , but in a polished version. Locally-sourced marble was used for the flooring, and the design is enhanced with brass features on the interior doors. The Cottage House is actually part of a bigger plan that is set to be built on the same site, including a garage and a swimming pool. The design of the home, as well as the remaining buildings, was almost entirely inspired by the surrounding landscape, which is characterized by protected stone pine, olive and  cork  trees. The sloped land at its highest point provides a stunning view of the Atlantic Ocean. + Atelier 1111 Photography by Nuno Pinto via Atelier 1111

See the rest here: 
Rammed concrete home in Portugal boasts passive design features and a green roof

A solar-powered home in Maine rises above the sand dunes on wooden stilts

March 20, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A solar-powered home in Maine rises above the sand dunes on wooden stilts

Portland-based firm  Caleb Johnson Studio has unveiled a beautiful cedar-clad home elevated off the ground on stilts so that the natural “landscape is allowed to flow under the house.” The solar-powered home, named “In the Dunes,” was designed to not only protect the natural dune terrain, but the resilient design also reduces the risk of damage caused by potential coastal flooding. Located in the coastal town of Wells in southern Maine, the three-story home is built on sand dunes overlooking the Atlantic Ocean. Due to instability of the dune landscape, the architects decided to elevate the home off the ground by large wooden stilts  built into a concrete plinth. According to the firm, this was a strategic decision to allow the landscape to continue in its natural state under the home. It is also a resilient feature to protect the home from coastal flooding. Related: Stormwaters sweep beneath this coastal beach house raised above dunes The design was meant to fit into the local vernacular, comprised mainly of charming beach houses . “This home was influenced by the vernacular coastal structures that can be found dotting the Maine coast,” Caleb Johnson Studio said in a project description. “The building was simplified to pure geometric forms and then manipulated and modernized to take advantage of the sea and marsh views.” With its cedar cladding, pitched roofs (installed with solar panels ) and multiple large windows, the home certainly manages to blend in with its natural surroundings. On the interior, the space is also focused on the incredible views. The ground floor is marked by the large wooden stilts that form a pleasant, open-air space, which wraps around the home with a wooden pathway leading the way to the glass-enclosed entryway. From the front door, a large window surrounded by natural stones leads up to the upper floors. Once inside, an abundance of strategically placed windows provide panoramic views from nearly any angle. An interior design comprised of a neutral color palette and minimal furnishings creates an incredibly welcoming home. + Caleb Johnson Studio Via Dezeen Photography by Trent Bell via Caleb Johnson Studio

Go here to see the original: 
A solar-powered home in Maine rises above the sand dunes on wooden stilts

The Greenest Little House Addition and Income Generator

March 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Greenest Little House Addition and Income Generator

If you’re an avid viewer of Tiny House Nation on … The post The Greenest Little House Addition and Income Generator appeared first on Earth911.com.

Go here to see the original:
The Greenest Little House Addition and Income Generator

Solar-powered home puts an eco-friendly twist on the farmhouse vernacular

March 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Solar-powered home puts an eco-friendly twist on the farmhouse vernacular

When architect Paul O’Reilly of the Australian architectural practice archterra was asked by his mother to design a modern farmhouse, he delivered a handsome dwelling that not only takes inspiration from traditional barn architecture, but also deftly addresses the region’s climatic extremes with its site-specific, energy-efficient build. Aptly named the Farm House, the roughly 2,000-square-foot abode features a gabled roofline, a veranda and timber cladding to mimic traditional barns, while the interior is decidedly contemporary and dressed in natural materials, including rammed earth and oiled timber cladding. Moreover, the home is energy-efficient , taking cues from passive solar principles and drawing power from a 2.5-kilowatt solar photovoltaic array. Located on a grassy paddock on a working cattle farm near Margaret River, the Farm House is a two-bedroom, two-bathroom abode that places the sleeping areas toward the south and the open-plan living areas to the north. Large outdoor decks open off of the two bedrooms and the living area toward the east. “Primary outlook across paddocks to the east and a need to maintain a passive solar orientation to the north generated a T-shaped plan response with the living pavilion orientated to the north, whilst the sleeping areas align east-west,” explained the architecture firm. “Morning sun is moderated on the sleeping pavilion by the traditional veranda to the east whilst a thick rammed earth wall to the west ensures the thermal lag effect of the earth wall keeps internal spaces cool into the early evening.” Related: Solar-powered Bush House exemplifies chic eco-friendly living in the Australian outback The home’s passive solar orientation mitigates unwanted heat gain and permits cooling cross breezes to flow through the home from all directions. In addition to the thermally efficient envelope, the energy efficiency of the Farm House is bolstered by the addition of an evacuated tube solar hot water heater, a solar photovoltaic array, rainwater collection  and wastewater treatment systems. Recycled timber and bricks lower the embodied energy of the project as well. + archterra Photography by Douglas Mark Black via archterra

Here is the original post:
Solar-powered home puts an eco-friendly twist on the farmhouse vernacular

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 971 access attempts in the last 7 days.