Gorgeous year-round bath house in Sweden soaks up the winter sun

May 19, 2017 by  
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This minimalist bath house allows inhabitants of Karlshamn, Sweden, to enjoying the sea all year round. White Arkitekter designed the timber-clad building to age naturally for low-maintenance facilities that straddle both the water and the land. The town’s first bath house was carefully situated to soak up as much sunlight as possible all winter long, while protecting visitors from the chilly winter winds. Local organization Kallbadhusets Vänner (Friends of the Bath House) worked with local sponsors and the municipality to realize a project which would allow people to enjoy the sea all year round. Kallbadhus is located along a beach promenade, close to the public swimming hall . Sitting at a height of three meters above sea level, the sharply angled timber-clad volume straddles solid land and water while offering views of the sea. Related: Tiny Norwegian Prefab Bathhouse is Clad in Sustainable Kebony Wood Two glulam beams provide structural support for a small bridge that links the building to the beach. A common room with an adjoining terrace is flanked on one side by the women’s sauna and the by the men’s sauna on the other. The architects designed the saunas to receive optimal amount of sunlight while simultaneously offering protection from the wind. The exterior cladding is treated with a grey-pigmented oil which allows the wood to age naturally. + White Arkitekter Via World Architecture News

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Gorgeous year-round bath house in Sweden soaks up the winter sun

10 groundbreaking designs by Shigeru Ban that changed our ideas about architecture

May 8, 2017 by  
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Shigeru Ban, one of Inhabitat’s favorite architects , is renowned for his disaster relief design and his ingenious use of lightweight, unconventional, and environmentally responsible materials — in particular, paper and bamboo. His signature water-proof and fire-proof paper tube architecture is iconic around the world. In recognition for his inspiring work, Ban was named the 2014 winner of the prestigious Pritzker Prize . A leader for humanitarian architecture and experimental design, Shigeru Ban said of his accolade: “Receiving this prize is a great honor, and with it, I must be careful. I must continue to listen to the people I work for, in my private residential commissions and in my disaster relief work. I see this prize as encouragement for me to keep doing what I am doing – not to change what I am doing, but to grow.” We’ve rounded up some of our favorite projects by the accomplished Japanese architect, click below to see some of his most inspiring work. Shigeru Ban designed, pro-bono, this stunning temporary Cardboard Cathedral for Christchurch following a devastating earthquake in 2011. Built with his signature paper-tubes, the transitional church can hold up to 700 people and is built to last 50 years. Centre Pompidou-Metz in Metz, France The curvaceous Centre Pompidou-Metz is an extension of the Pompidou arts center of Paris. Its undulating roof made up of a hexagonal pattern was inspired by the woven structure of a Chinese hat that Shigeru Ban found in Paris. Curtain Wall House in Tokyo, Japan One of Ban’s most iconic works, the Curtain Wall House is a contemporary twist on the traditional Japanese home. Two-story-tall billowing curtains wrap around the perimeter of the house like a cocoon that can be opened or closed to allow transparency between the interior and exterior. Cardboard Bridge over Gardon River, France In another display of paper’s structural might, Ban transformed cardboard tubes and recycled paper-plastic composite into a a bridge spanning the Gardon River in southern France . The temporary masterpiece was created out of 281 cardboard tubes and was strong enough to support 20 people at a time. Paper Church in Kobe, Japan After the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake destroyed the Takatori Church in Kobe, Ban designed a temporary paper-tube church pro-bono. Ten years later, the paper church was deconstructed and donated to a Catholic community in Taiwan, where it served as a place for worship. Onagawa Container Temporary Housing in Onagawa, Japan When a powerful earthquake devastated the Japanese town of Onagawa in 2011, Shigeru Ban was quick to design and install temporary disaster-relief housing built from paper tubes and shipping containers. The lightweight, affordable, and clean design provided fast relief to the earthquake survivors while simultaneously lifting spirits with its dignified design. Paper Partition System, Iteration 4 After the 2011 earthquakes and tsunami in Japan, Ban designed his fourth iteration of the Paper Partition System, which provide privacy in existing emergency shelters . Constructed from paper tubes, white canvas sheets, and safety pins, these pop-up partitions were financed with donations from around the world. Tamedia New Office Building in Zurich, Switzerland Built for the Swiss media company Tamedia in Zurich, this carbon neutral office building was created from interlocking wooden beams without the need for metal joints and glue. The beautiful wooden structure also features a glass facade to fill the interior with light. Post-Tsunami Kirinda Project in Kirinda, Sri Lanka In 2004, Ban designed 100 small homes for Sri Lankan villagers displaced by a tsunami in Kirinda. The tiny homes are built from earth bricks and locally-sourced rubber tree wood. Villa at Sengokubara in Kanagawa, Japan Villa at Sengokubara is a minimalist wooden house that wraps around a teardrop-shaped courtyard. Like in his other architecture works, Ban creates a nearly seamless transition between the interior and exterior spaces. + Shigeru Ban

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10 groundbreaking designs by Shigeru Ban that changed our ideas about architecture

Germany just generated a record 85% of its energy from renewable sources

May 8, 2017 by  
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Germany has outdone itself yet again when it comes to clean energy . From April 30 through May 1, the country set a national record by generating 85% of all its energy needs using renewable wind, solar, biomass, and hydroelectric power. And this isn’t just an anomaly – experts believe that this will be the new normal for Germany by 2030. “Most of Germany’s coal-fired power stations were not even operating on Sunday, April 30th, with renewable sources accounting for 85 per cent of electricity across the country. Nuclear power sources, which are planned to be completely phased out by 2022, were also severely reduced,” said Patrick Graichen of Agora Energiewende Initiative . Related: Google’s Project Sunroof expands to 7 million homes in Germany Germany has worked hard to invest in clean energy sources under Angela Merkel , a vocal supporter of renewable energy. It has paid off. In addition to record-breaking weekends like the one on April 30, more and more energy is coming from renewables. In March, the country average 40% energy from green sources. via Clean Technica images via Flickr ( 1 , 2 )

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Germany just generated a record 85% of its energy from renewable sources

Celebrate Cinco de Mayo: Make Your Own Recycled Piñata

May 5, 2017 by  
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Cinco de Mayo is here, and I’m going to help you get in the spirit of the day by showing you how to reuse materials you have around the house to make your own simple recycled piñata. I can’t be the only one who has a closet full of reusable…

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Celebrate Cinco de Mayo: Make Your Own Recycled Piñata

This 18th-century London townhouse hides a swimming pool under a glass floor

May 4, 2017 by  
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This 18th-century London townhouse hides a swimming pool under a glass floor

Seoul’s multi-tiered Deep House slopes into a gorgeous grassy roof

April 26, 2017 by  
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This house in South Korea’s capital utilizes negative space to create various micro-environments that boost the building’s energy efficiency. Architecture firm poly.m.ur designed the Deep House as a single volume featuring a slanted roof and walls where one room flows into another. The tilted roof provides ample storage inside and gives each residential unit expansive views of the surroundings. The house features a slanted roof and stone louvers along the sloping sides of the building. Taking inspiration from a design philosophy based on the idea of dispersing the main volume through the use of shallow depth, the architects created hollow spaces that improve the energy efficiency of the building and provide ample storage space . Related: Angular residence by Moon Hoon maximizes privacy and a tiny plot Box-type corner windows are strategically laid out to provide optimal views of the surrounding landscape while minimizing the effects of cold winter winds. Instead of treating windows as two-dimensional elements, the architects conceived them as “micro-spaces” or “rooms inside rooms”. + poly.m.ur Via Archdaily Photos by Kyungsub Shin

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Seoul’s multi-tiered Deep House slopes into a gorgeous grassy roof

Europes tallest modular tower snaps together in north London

April 20, 2017 by  
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The last module has slotted into place on Europe’s tallest modular tower. Designed by multidisciplinary practice HTA Design LLP , the record-breaking Apex House is a new student housing development that rises to the height of 29 stories in the Wembley Regeneration Area. Completed in just 12 months, the modular high-rise makes use of highly advanced prefabrication techniques and boasts energy-saving systems to achieve a BREEAM rating of Excellent. Developed by Tide Construction and Vision Modular Systems , the Apex House comprises 679 modules with over 580 rooms that’ll be ready for students to move into this fall. The modules were prefabricated in Tide Construction and Vision Modular Systems’ factory 60 miles away in Bedford with all the furniture, windows, electric wiring, and plumbing installed before they were transported to the site. The modules were stacked to a height of 90 meters in just 13 weeks. Related: Apartment Tour: Inside the world’s tallest modular building “Modular construction provides a much faster alternative to traditional construction without compromising on the quality of the building, or the versatility of the design,” said Christy Hayes, chief executive officer at Tide Construction, according to WAN . “Modular produces 80% less waste, requires fewer onsite workers and provides certainty of cost and time. Apex House is a shining example of what modular construction can bring to UK property, whether its hotels, residential apartments, build to rent or student accommodation .” The Apex House is the second tallest modular building in the world. + HTA Design LLP + Tide Construction and Vision Modular Systems Via WAN Images via http://www.visionmodular.com , photos by Richard Southall

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Europes tallest modular tower snaps together in north London

Architect Jim Olson spent 55 years renovating this breathtaking Puget Sound cabin

April 5, 2017 by  
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It would be safe to say that architect Jim Olson from Olson Kundig Architects is an incredibly patient man. In a world where architects strive to build skyscapers at record-breaking speed , the award-winning architect took his time with the construction of his own lake house, as in 55 years. Olson began to build the cabin, located in Longbranch, Washington, in 1959. What began as a mere 14-square-foot bunk house has been patiently and lovingly transformed over the years into a breathtaking lake-side cabin . Starting the cabin construction when he was just 18-years-old, Olson has worked on the structure for decades, always adding new features to the design. However, the word “renovation” doesn’t adequately describe the cabin’s decades-long transformation; rather it was a creative layering process that always incorporated the cabin’s past features into its more modern present. Related: Enproyecto Arquitectura’s Spanish Coastal Stone Cabin Holds More Than a Few Surprises Details hidden among the modest cabin mark each remodeling stage, architecturally revealing the cabin’s design history. Distinct textures and color schemes make up the impressive living space which lies under the exposed glulam beams. Steel columns mark the living space divisions and impressive floor-to-ceiling windows allow for incredible full-frame views of the Puget Sound. In addition to the architect’s sophisticated design features, there are various signs of Olson’s love of nature within the home. Fir flooring extends throughout the living room onto the exterior deck, seamlessly connecting the interior with the exterior. The outdoor deck was also built around three large trees that grew up during the long construction period. Olson wanted to make sure that they were able to continue to grow uninterrupted no matter what new construction may come to the house. + Olson Kundig Architects Via Gessato Images via Olson Kundig Architects  

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Architect Jim Olson spent 55 years renovating this breathtaking Puget Sound cabin

This futuristic metal-clad residence is segmented like a lobster tail

April 5, 2017 by  
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This futuristic residential building in Luxembourg has a segmented facade that resembles the tail of a lobster or an exotic insect. Design studio Metaform sought to eliminate some of the major problems that occur in multi-family housing projects – such as the lack of privacy, natural light , and open space. Metaform approached the project in an experimental way in order to respond to the steep topography and preserve the existing three-century-old trees located on the plot. These elements inspired the form of the building, which is split into six smaller, vertically shifted blocks. This allowed the designers to preserve the required density while providing residents with a sense of belonging, identity and human scale. Thanks to the resulting layout, the units receive ample amounts of natural light and have panoramic views of the surrounding landscape and the city. Related: Innovative Gap House in Seoul saves space with communal living areas The ventilated facade is clad in triangular aluminium panels . Passive house design features work together with a well-insulated facade and glass elements coated with anti-UV film that protects the interior from overheating. Solar panels and living roofs round out the home’s green building strategies, ensuring low-energy performance. Related: Belles Townhomes is SF’s First LEED Platinum Multi-Family Housing The design eliminates long, horizontal circulation routes, which can often be dark and acoustically problematic. Three vertical cores connect underground parking directly to the apartments–an element that allows the units to have three-sided orientations. Apart from offering privacy, the architects also wanted to give residents the possibility to meet and get to know each other in common shared indoor spaces like kitchens and living rooms. + Metaform Via v2 com Photos by Steve Troes Fotodesign

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This futuristic metal-clad residence is segmented like a lobster tail

The original Brexit: ancient Britain’s geological split from Europe

April 5, 2017 by  
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Brexit – or Britain’s vote to leave the European Union – remains controversial even as Prime Minister Theresa May begins the process of leaving. But it turns out this process may not have been the first Brexit ever. Research led by Imperial College London scientists found evidence of an ancient geological Brexit – “the Brexit nobody voted for” – in the Dover Strait. According to their research a land bridge once existed between England and France . Ancient Britain, regardless of the lack of cities and people, might have been almost unrecognizable according to geophysical and seafloor data. In this Britain, which could have existed 450,000 years ago during an ice age, the whole English Channel would have been a frozen tundra crossed only by small rivers. Britain may have been physically connected to Europe by a chalk rock ridge spanning the Dover Strait that held back a proglacial lake , or lake in front of an ice sheet according to Imperial College London, in what is today the North Sea. Giant waterfalls from the lake could have contributed to erosion that breached the ridge. Related: UK’s Brexit vote could reverse environmental protections and contribute to climate change The data shows a valley system and huge holes on the seafloor. In France, there are around seven of these holes, or plunge pools, around 328 feet deep in a solid rock line between Dover and Calais. The straight line backs up the idea the holes were created by waterfalls cascading over a ridge about 328 feet high and around 20 miles long – the land bridge – to hit the ground below and erode rock. Catastrophic flooding is thought to have finished the ancient Brexit. The researchers found evidence of megaflood processes, which could have carved the valleys. Imperial College London professor Sanjeev Gupta, co-author on a paper published online yesterday in Nature Communications , said in a statement, “The breaching of this land bridge between Dover and Calais was undeniably one of the most important events in British history, helping to shape our island nation’s identity even today. When the ice age ended and sea levels rose, flooding the valley floor for good, Britain lost its physical connection to the mainland. Without this dramatic breaching Britain would still be part of Europe. This is Brexit 1.0 – the Brexit nobody voted for.” Via Imperial College London Images courtesy Imperial College London and Wikimedia Commons

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The original Brexit: ancient Britain’s geological split from Europe

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