Take your sustainable lifestyle to the next level in 2021

January 1, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Take your sustainable lifestyle to the next level in 2021

Are you already recycling? Carrying around a refillable water bottle rather than contributing to the ocean-bound plastic problem? Composting your food scraps? That’s all commendable, but there’s more to be done to achieve a net-zero lifestyle. If you’re ready to up your environmental commitment this year (and hold larger entities accountable along the way), here are a few ideas — some more dramatic than others — for sustainable resolutions in 2021. Get rid of your car If you have a car , sell or donate it. Once you’ve unloaded the gas guzzler, do your errands on foot or by bike. If you don’t have your own bike, join your city’s bike-share program. With proper COVID-19 precautions, take public transportation for longer distances. Related: The pros and cons of electromobility Ditch the plastic liners Do you know how long those kitchen trash bags take to decompose? Anywhere from 10 to 1,000 years. Instead, go au naturel and regularly clean your trash, recycling and compost containers. Change your laundering style Did you know that most of the energy it takes to run a washing machine comes from heating the water? Only 10% of energy is for working the machine, so switch to cold-water washing . Once your clothes are clean, hang them to dry. If you live somewhere sunny and have space for a clothesline, this won’t be too hard. If you live somewhere cold and rainy, see if you can hang an inside clothesline or set up a drying rack. But if this is impractical and you must run the dryer, make sure it’s fairly full so you make the most of the energy. Dryers are the third-biggest energy hogs in the average house, after the refrigerator and washer. Forget the lawn Lawns are a huge waste of space and resources. In the U.S., people spray about 3 trillion gallons of water on them every year, use 800 million gallons of gas in their lawnmowers and treat them with nearly 80 million pounds of pesticides . But who are we trying to impress with this golf course-looking terrain around our homes? Instead, go with xeriscaping or planting vegetables. Let clover take over, or fill your yard with pollinator-friendly plants. Control your climate Invest in ways to weatherize your home and lifestyle year-round. If you have the money and own a home, a heat pump can cut your energy use in half. Try low-tech solutions like wearing thicker socks and a fleece bathrobe over your clothes so that you don’t need to turn the heater up as much in winter. Add an extra blanket to the bed, and turn your thermostat down at least seven degrees at night. You use about 1% less energy per eight hours for every degree you turn it down. In summer, air conditioning is a massive energy hog. Three-quarters of U.S. homes have air conditioners, which use 6% of the total electricity produced in the nation, according to Energy Saver . Annual cost? About $29 billion dollars and 117 million metric tons of carbon dioxide released. If you must use AC, don’t set it so low. Add insulation to your house. Wear a bikini. Eat more ice pops. Sweat a little, it won’t hurt you. Go vegan Yes, Meatless Mondays are a terrific start. But this year, try adding Tuesday. And Wednesday. Et cetera. A University of Oxford study concluded that cutting out meat and dairy could reduce your carbon footprint by 73%. “A vegan diet is probably the single biggest way to reduce your impact on planet Earth, not just greenhouse gases, but global acidification, eutrophication, land use and water use,” said lead author Joseph Poore, as reported by The Independent . Boycott new One way to stop supporting the constant addition to more junk in the waste stream is to boycott buying anything new (excluding food, prescriptions or emergency items). Perhaps you already enjoy thrifting and flea markets. If so, committing to buying nothing new might be a fun challenge. Make 2021 your year of browsing the free libraries, finding your new look at a garage sale and swapping useful items with other folks in your neighborhood. Set up regular donations to environmental organizations Just about every organization needs your help right now. Whether you prefer whales or bats, oceans or rivers, an environmental charity exists that would greatly appreciate your recurring donation, even if it’s just five bucks a month. Control your food waste The U.S. is one of the top countries for food waste in the world, tossing almost 40 million tons annually. Most of this food goes to landfills. In fact, food waste is the second-largest component of the average American landfill behind paper. This year, commit to only buy what you’ll eat and to eat what you buy. If you don’t already compost, get yourself a compost bin and throw in all your banana peels, coffee grounds, etc. Get political On the most basic level, vote. Beyond that, support causes you believe in by writing letters to your politicians or boycotting companies that are contributing to the global climate crisis. Attend town hall meetings with your local or state representatives. If you have the time, energy, resources and moxie, run for office. Images via Adobe Stock

View original here:
Take your sustainable lifestyle to the next level in 2021

A friendly rescue dog inspired this sustainable home remodel

December 25, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A friendly rescue dog inspired this sustainable home remodel

This property in Lithuania is shared by “the real owner of the area,” a rescue dog named Brownie. According to the architects at Arches, the firm responsible for the sustainable home remodel , the calm dog was the first to greet them when they initially came to visit the site. Apparently, Brownie had been there longer than the current owners. Years ago, the former owners noticed a lost stray on their property and decided to feed and shelter the dog while letting him come and go as he pleased. When the owners sold the home and moved away, Brownie stayed loyal to the place, even sticking around waiting patiently through the construction period. Brownie has since become a beloved and well-known dog in the area, and he has remained on-patrol on the property with the new owners, helping to greet visitors. Related: Get away from it all in this tiny hut tucked into a Lithuanian forest The project focused on reconstructing the existing older buildings to better compliment that picturesque landscape. There is a main residential house located in the upper area of the site as well as a separate storehouse sitting on the lower part. A granite pavement connects the two with some newly planted pines to continue the undergrowth of the former trees. Only ecological and sustainable materials are used in the project. The facades, made from natural cedar , are what help give this project its name of Cedar House. The window and door details are made from copper. The materials offer a traditional and reliable option by giving long-lasting protection. Pinewood is used for the main construction of both buildings, and the designers chose natural wood wool for the heat insulation. Clay plaster , a locally sourced material, covers the inner walls. Cedar House requires minimal interventions and helps celebrate the natural context of its surroundings, including Brownie the loyal watchdog. + Arches Photography by Norbert Tukaj via Arches

Original post:
A friendly rescue dog inspired this sustainable home remodel

Proposed skating rink uses melted ice to sustain wetland habitats

December 25, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Proposed skating rink uses melted ice to sustain wetland habitats

Designed by FaulknerBrowns Architects, the $40 million Lee Valley Ice Centre in London will feature two Olympic-sized ice rinks and use ice from the facility to benefit the sustainability and biodiversity of the building site. Along with sustainable design features like high performance insulation and rooftop solar panels , the facility’s melted ice will be filtered through reed beds to create new wetland habitats onsite. The design, which will replace an existing 36-year-old single rink, is pending second-round approval from the Greater London Authority. If the project does get approved, it will double the center’s capacity to 557,000 visits per year, providing more community access and complementing the surrounding Lee Valley Regional Park. The 26-mile-long park comprises 10,000 acres and a mixture of diverse heritage sites, natural reserves and award-winning gardens, along with another Olympic-sized venue also designed by FaulknerBrowns. Related: Renewable energy to power 2024 Olympic aquatic center The building site is in an important region for nature conservation , so the design team remained aware of the responsibility to preserve the unique, natural character of the area with the smallest possible environmental footprint. Their response was a pavilion-like structure that uses a heavy base plinth on the lower portion of the elevation to anchor the building to the flat landscape. The base forms a podium under the ice halls, which are insulated with cladding panels to create two environmentally controlled “fridges” that are wrapped by a copper-colored metal band. This band is separated from the plinth with a flowing, curved edge to create the illusion of a building floating within the landscape. The Lee Valley Ice Centre has also been rotated from its previous position to allow natural movement through the green spaces and to create a more welcoming gateway to the neighboring marsh. According to the architects, this reimagined position plus the proposed landscaping design with native plants and melted ice filtration system will result in a biodiversity net gain of 35%. + FaulknerBrowns Architects Images via FaulknerBrowns Architects

See original here: 
Proposed skating rink uses melted ice to sustain wetland habitats

The top 7 amazing tiny homes weve seen this year

December 24, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on The top 7 amazing tiny homes weve seen this year

2020 was certainly one for the history books. But among all of the negativity in the news throughout this past year, there were also plenty of innovative and creative design solutions to the world’s problems shining through. While a large portion of Americans adjusted to life working remotely and others faced economic struggles due to the pandemic, tiny homes and inventive office spaces have never been so relevant. True to form, tiny luxury also flourished, with some of the best designs of the year combining space-saving minimalism with luxurious creature comforts despite small square footage. Read on to learn more about the top seven tiny homes we’ve seen this year here at Inhabitat. Canada Goose Brought to us by Mint Tiny Homes, the Canada Goose is a gorgeous, rustic tiny home on wheels that will make you feel like you’ve walked into a minimalist’s sustainable farmhouse . With a spacious kitchen and bathroom, an entire area dedicated to a living room, and a full-sized bedroom on the gooseneck hitch, it is clear that the designers at Mint put a lot of thought into space utilization. Plus, we can’t get enough of the reclaimed barn doors and the dark wood accents to complement the bright white interior. Available in 38 and 41 feet, the Canada Goose fits three beds and can house six to eight people comfortably. Related: Tiny House Sustainable Living blog documents life in an off-grid tiny home LaLa’s Seaesta This quirky tiny house located only blocks from the beach has a design that’s just as clever as its name. Texas-based Plum Construction uses every inch of the property’s small square footage with a cute dining nook that converts into a sleeping area and a secret, hidden patio underneath. Just 410 square feet of space with an additional 80-square-foot loft inside, the home’s gable decoration is constructed from reclaimed cypress wood from a local house dating back 120 years. We think the best part of this property is the hidden patio, which takes advantage of the space left clear from the home’s stilts and features a hammock, a bar and an outdoor shower. The patio’s ventilated, slatted walls allows the ocean breeze to flow in. The Natura It might be enough for some sustainable design companies that the Natura tiny house is powered by 1000W-2000W rooftop solar panels, but not for U.K.-based The Tiny Housing Company. The firm goes several steps further by using natural materials such as cork and wood for the construction, as well as adding a wood-burning stove connected to underfloor heating, clean water filtration from an under-sink system, energy-efficient appliances and rockwool insulation (a rock-based mineral fiber composed of volcanic basalt rock and recycled steel or copper byproduct). The Kirimoko Looking at the interior of the Kirimoko in New Zealand, one would never guess that Condon Scott Architects would be able to fit all those amenities into a 322-square-foot footprint. This passive house boasts high-efficiency structural insulated panels paired with larch weatherboards to help keep out moisture as well as asphalt shingles and natural ventilation. This means the tiny home requires virtually no additional energy to keep temperatures comfortable in an unforgiving Central Otago climate. Characterized by a gable form, a black rain screen and massive windows, there is an abundance of natural light that makes this home look exceptionally bright and airy. Denali XL Denali XL, which is a larger version of Alabama-based Timbercraft Tiny Homes’ popular Denali model, features 399 square feet of floor space and a 65-square-foot loft. This tiny home may look like a rustic cabin from the outside, but once you cross the threshold, you’ll find a king-sized loft bedroom with powered skylights that open automatically on a timer or rain sensor, a large walk in closet, a luxurious steam shower and quartz countertops. Additional sustainable elements such as a trash compactor, high efficiency insulation and an incinerating toilet help earn this tiny home a spot on the list. Oasis Tiny House It’s easy to see how the Oasis Tiny House got its name. This 260-square-foot tiny home is located on the Big Island of Hawaii and features several luxurious touches that highlight the tropical ambiance of the space. An outdoor bar, for example, can be found directly below the curly mango wood kitchen window, designed to allow food and drinks to be passed through with ease. There is also a skylight in the bathroom to give the feel of an outdoor shower thanks to the home’s verdant jungle surroundings. The Oasis Tiny House is the creation of the sister-brother duo at Paradise Tiny Homes. The Culp A spa-like, walk-in hot tub is not something you’d expect to see inside of a 500-square-foot tiny home, but that didn’t stop Florida-based Movable Roots tiny home design company. When the client requested room for a soaking tub, the designers rose to the occasion and even added an incinerating toilet for good measure. The tiny home also has a galley kitchen and a primary bedroom with storage stairs leading up to dual loft spaces, which are naturally lit and spacious enough to be used as guest rooms, offices or storage. Another feature we love inside The Culp is its low-maintenance, two-tone metal exterior and the cork plank flooring.

Continued here: 
The top 7 amazing tiny homes weve seen this year

The Cyril tiny home has space for everything including the cats

December 18, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The Cyril tiny home has space for everything including the cats

Tiny houses are intended to feel cozy, so when clients Summer and Jason told the designers at Build Tiny that their house couldn’t be a home without space for their two rescue cats , the team worked the couple’s needs into the design. The Cyril tiny house, a project name inspired by Summer’s grandfather’s love of tiny homes , was originally going to be a labor of love for the couple themselves. However, once working on the details with Build Tiny, they decided to have the company take over the building process. The clients did contribute heavily to the 13-plus revisions and are thrilled with the end result. “Living in Cyril is like being on holiday every day,” Summer and Jason said. “We couldn’t be happier with what the team has built for us and will always remain friends and fans of the company.” Related: Tiny House Sustainable Living blog documents life in an off-grid tiny home Cyril is a two-story tiny house with plenty of space for an office, full kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and living room stuffed with few material possessions and a ton of amenities. Bamboo countertops, room for a washing machine and copious cabinetry in the kitchen appropriately take center stage in the middle of the tiny house . This area also connects to an outdoor dining counter through a fully-retractable passthrough window. Above the sitting area is a loft bedroom with a queen bed, cubicle and drawer storage on both sides, plus enough room to stand up. Across the tiny home, a loft office has a wall-to-wall desktop and chairs perched in front of a long window. Between the two spaces, the two cats can explore wall-mounted ramps at varying levels. The bathroom also accounts for the kitties, leaving room for a litter box amongst the various storage shelving and drawers. In addition to creating a welcoming space for the two-human, two-feline family, the goal was to use sustainable materials and systems. In alignment with that goal, solar panels produce enough power for the Cyril tiny house, and battery storage (tucked inside the sides of the home near the bathroom) holds any excess power that is produced. Another energy-efficient addition is the dome surrounding the shower, which holds in heat. The Natureshead composting toilet reduces water consumption. A gas water heater provides hot water, and there are plans to add a small fireplace to the living room, too. + Build Tiny  Via Yanko Design Images via Build Tiny Limited

View post: 
The Cyril tiny home has space for everything including the cats

Luxury timber home mimics a rocky outcropping for minimal site impact

December 18, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Luxury timber home mimics a rocky outcropping for minimal site impact

As part of an ongoing series to promote the eco-friendly use of renewable materials, Montreal-based studio Natalie Dionne Architecture has completed the Forest House I, a low-impact luxury home that celebrates timber inside and out. Set atop an outcrop of the Canadian Shield in the forested Eastern Townships, roughly 100 kilometers southeast of Montreal , the recently completed dwelling was commissioned by a couple who had long dreamed of a home in the heart of nature. In addition to a predominately timber palette, the architects inserted large glazing and outdoor living spaces to achieve a seamless transition between the indoors and out. Though rich in natural beauty, the client’s 3-acre property posed major siting challenges in the beginning due to suboptimal orientation and the presence of many rocky outcrops. Rather than fill in the landscape with concrete, the architects took inspiration from a “particularly impractical” 3-meter-tall rock formation to devise an elevated design solution that would not only minimize site impact to the existing terrain but would also improve the home’s access to views and natural light. Related: This timber-clad cabin appears to hover over an idyllic lake landscape Wrapped in low-maintenance eastern white cedar pretreated to encourage a silvery gray patina , the linear, 215-square-meter home rises out of the landscape like a rocky outcropping that is anchored on one end atop a base where a rock once stood. The other end, which is supported by slim columns, appears to hover over the rocky cleft and culminates in a partially sheltered terrace pointing toward a moss-covered escarpment. Glazed sliding doors allow for an uninterrupted transition between the outdoor living area and indoor kitchen, dining room and living room. The couple’s bedroom suite is tucked away on the southern end of the house. A staircase leads down to the smaller ground floor, where the entrance hall and a bunkroom — capable of accommodating up to 10 guests — are located.  Views of the forest are pulled indoors by floor-to-ceiling glazing, and a variety of timber surfaces reinforce the design’s connection with nature. Solid maple was used for the kitchen islands as well as for the vanities and stairs. The built-in cabinetry is constructed from Russian plywood. The timber palette is harmoniously integrated with polished concrete floors, white gypsum walls and natural aluminum windows. + Natalie Dionne Architecture Photography by Raphaël Thibodeau via Natalie Dionne Architecture

View original post here: 
Luxury timber home mimics a rocky outcropping for minimal site impact

Embracing the stylish, sustainable cottagecore trend

December 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Embracing the stylish, sustainable cottagecore trend

It’s the birthright of every generation to rebel against its forebears. So how can young people today define themselves as different from their phone-obsessed, digital-native parents? By donning Little House on the Prairie dresses, baking pies and cavorting with fairies. The cottagecore aesthetic has become popular with Gen Z, but what many don’t realize is how this trend actually finds its roots in sustainability. According to the Urban Dictionary, cottagecore is “a niche aesthetic based around the visual culture of an idealized life on a Western farm. Common themes include sustainability, gardens , farm animals, rural living and nature.” That makes this trend a good way to embrace an eco-lifestyle, learn some new skills, breathe fresh air and have fun. Related: What is cottagecore? “During the worldwide pandemic and long periods of stay-at-home orders, the movement accelerated rapidly as people looked for an escape from our dark reality,” said Amelia Ansink, accessories editor for Fashion Snoops, as reported by Today. “Cottagecore unintentionally represents the ideal quarantine life, where isolation in nature is strived for and everything we need can be produced at home and by our own hands.” Cottagecore apparel When the world is in lockdown and people are working from home (if at all), choosing clothes can feel like a game of dress-up. Who are we dressing for right now? Mostly ourselves. So if you’ve ever yearned to dress like a Holly Hobbie doll, this is your fashion moment. Whether you’re baking muffins, embroidering on the porch swing or picnicking in a field, prairie-inspired dresses of seersucker, faded denim, cotton and linen fit the aesthetic. Think ruffles and soft colors, paired with straw hats, jute bags and a wicker picnic basket. Gingham checks and floral prints are top choices. Hair is worn long and natural, topped with flower crowns or wrapped in a bandana. If you’re doing something a little dirtier — say, cleaning up after the chickens — striped overalls may be a better wardrobe option. Courtney Fox, 27, runs the cottagecore Instagram account @thefoxandtheivy . “I grew up in rolling farmland in rural Pennsylvania, not too far from Lancaster County, which has a large population of Amish, so this landscape and way of living helped to inspire me,” she said, as reported in Today. Her fashion role models include literary heroines like Anne of Green Gables and the characters in Little Women. The trend has helped Fox live in a more eco-friendly manner. “For me, cottagecore has meant trying to reduce my waste production and purchase things more sustainably, including my clothing,” she said. “There was a time when I was buying fast fashion , but I realized it didn’t really align with my values.” While cottagecore fashion tends to be femme, anyone can join in. Flat caps, tweed, knitted sweaters and walking sticks all help you dress the part. Bonus points if you take up beekeeping and baking. Your cottagecore home Because cottagecore makes the old new again, that means upcyling , thrifting, garage sales and flea markets are all part of the lifestyle. No need to contribute to the manufacturing of new goods and the accompanying emissions. If you picture a stereotypical grandmother’s cottage — lace curtains, floral tablecloths, vintage baskets and antique vases — you’ve got the right idea. Related: Unpacking the cottagecore home decor trend You may be able to tweak existing household accessories for the cottagecore look. Tone down brightly colored wood furniture with white chalk paint, which gives a rustic, shabby-chic feel, or use other muted paint colors like cream, light pink, yellow or green. If you’re lucky enough to live close to your mother or grandmother, raid their garage or attic — with their permission, of course — for cottagecore finds. They’ll probably be thrilled you can use something that’s just gathering dust and taking up space. Your cottagecore home needs a soundtrack. The Irish artist Hozier is at the top of the playlist, with Bon Iver, Florence and the Machine and any kind of romantic dark folk rock right behind. Taylor Swift has even joined in on the act with her new albums folklore and evermore. Cottagecore hobbies Cottagecore is about more than the way you and your house look. It also involves reviving wholesome hobbies of yesteryear. Gardening has become very popular during the pandemic and is directly tied in to other sustainable activities like baking and canning. Nothing beats growing your own rhubarb then serving it in a pie. Lockdown is the ideal time to improve your needle skills by sewing or embroidering. Top embroidery subjects are natural things like mushrooms , foxes and woodland fairies. Then there’s gaming. Cottagecore aficionados who can’t give up their technology can play rural- and nature-inspired games like Animal Crossing and Farmville. Everybody needs a break from the pandemic right now. Of cottagecore, popular British Instagrammer Keri-Anne Pink who runs @ gingerlillytea says, “I think it gives people a little bit of escapism from their own world and busy life.” Images via Bertrand Bouchez , Lê Tân , James DeMers and Lexi T

More:
Embracing the stylish, sustainable cottagecore trend

The Good Life House uses passive design for year-round comfort in Melbourne

December 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Good Life House uses passive design for year-round comfort in Melbourne

When Mark and Kate approached Brunswick-based firm MRTN Architects to design a new, energy-efficient home for their family of five in Fairfield, they brought with them a wealth of design ideas that included memories of family farm visits and the eco-friendly Alistair Knox houses that they had considered purchasing previously. The resulting home — dubbed the Good Life House — thoughtfully integrates those stylistic influences into a contemporary design that also references the Californian Bungalow and Arts and Crafts houses typical to the Fairfield suburb. Sustainability also informed many design choices, from the use of heat pump technologies to passive design elements, such as reverse brick veneer construction for thermal mass and high operable windows that take advantage of the stack effect. Instead of an open-plan layout, Mark and Kate made it clear from the start that they wanted a home where their family of five could “live together and also live together apart.” As a result, the architects divided the home into a series of smaller spaces that allow for a range of social and solitary activities. For example, instead of a main living space, the architects sandwiched the combined kitchen and dining room at the heart of the home between an “active living room” to the west and a “quiet living room” to the east. Related: Modern farmhouse-inspired dwelling in Melbourne is largely self-sufficient Though undeniably contemporary, the Good Life House respects the surrounding homes’ hip and gable roof forms with a similar roofline to fit in with its existing neighbors. But unlike its neighbors, the home eschews a front door in favor of a variety of entrance options that include entry via the covered outdoor space, the large sliding gate or the garden in the north. To ensure year-round comfort, the architects chose materials for optimal thermal performance and low-maintenance durability. In-slab hydronic flooring, ceiling fans and operable windows help maintain a comfortable thermal environment while energy-efficient appliances and a heat pump reduce the home’s energy footprint. + MRTN Architects Photography by Dave Kulesza via MRTN Architects

Read more: 
The Good Life House uses passive design for year-round comfort in Melbourne

Treat Fido and Fluffy with these eco-friendly holiday gifts for pets

December 3, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Treat Fido and Fluffy with these eco-friendly holiday gifts for pets

Our  pets  constantly give to us, from a morning lick on the forehead to a bedtime purr. They bring out our best, most loving selves, and inspire us to get exercise in all types of weather. Even when they’re naughty — climbing the Christmas tree, zooming around the house when you’re trying to sleep, begging for a taste of your food — they’re so dang cute. They deserve to be number one on our gifting lists, so here are some eco-friendly gifts they’ll enjoy this holiday season. Wool toy Does your  dog  love a good game of tug-of-war? These 100% domestic wool  LooHoo Wooly Tug Toys  are soft enough not to hurt Spot’s teeth but easy to get a grip on. The 14- to 16-inch length gives you extra space between your hand and those powerful doggy teeth. Related: Keep your cat safe with these eco-friendly cat toys Zero-waste pet kit As those with canine companions know, walking Fido serves multiple purposes, not just exercise. In addition to quality time together, walks provide an opportunity for your dog to … um … let loose. With the  Zero Waste Fur Baby Kit , you won’t have to worry about  plastic  bags sitting in the landfill for the next few centuries. The kit includes biodegradable dog waste bags, plus a dog brush, conditioning dog shampoo bar and a toy. Fido will look his best while also saving the planet. Organic catnip During the recent election results, was Tigger showing signs of great cat interest — such as opening her eyes, or even blinking — when state measures on recreational marijuana passed? She’s clearly trying to tell you something. Sprinkle this USDA-certified  organic catnip  on toys or scratching posts, and your kitty will soon be rolling around on the floor in all sorts of silly positions. Dog shampoo bar Every dog owner believes (incorrectly) they have the world’s cutest dog (sorry, I do!). But we don’t always like to admit that sometimes our dogs can be a little smelly. This organic  natural shampoo bar  combines cedarwood and lavender with organic shea butter, castor oil, soap nuts and calendula. The castor oil and shea butter softly penetrate even the coarsest fur. Your dog will love the skin-soothing feel and anti-inflammatory benefits of calendula. Endorsed by cats that want the dog in the household to smell better. Cat basket Many people who live with cats notice that their little friends can get crabby if they aren’t allowed to sleep about 16 hours a day. All this sleeping should take place somewhere that befits your elegant cat. This  fair trade cat basket  is made of recycled saris , recycled plastic and hogla grass, which grows abundantly in Bangladesh, where this basket is made. The pillow and pillow cover are washable. At 13 inches in diameter and 11 inches high, this basket best fits the petite feline. Wood pet tags Rover can proudly wear this attractive  pet tag , and if/when he roves, it will be easy for somebody to direct him home using the tag’s info. Choose from natural, chestnut or black wood in various sizes of bones or circles. These tags are handmade in Palo Alto,  California and promise to be “water/drool and tear resistant.” Pet bowls These  bowls by Whom  artistically blend  wood  and metal in a way that will enhance the corner of your kitchen floor far more than an ordinary, plastic food bowl. As the website promises, “Each is manufactured to order and handmade by our expert craftsman. No warehouse full of these!” It’s kind of like getting Mr. Whiskers a bespoke suit instead of buying him something off the rack. There are even double and triple bowls for pets that enjoy eating next to each other. A word of warning, though — once you buy a beautiful custom bowl, Mr. Whiskers might expect you to fill it with filet mignon, not kibble. Paw rescue balm Do your hands dry out on those cold  winter  days? Well, dog and cat paws can, too.  Organic Winter Dog Paw Rescue Balm  eases the pain of chapped noses and rough paw pads. It uses natural ingredients like coconut oil, beeswax, shea butter, olive oil, calendula, vetiver and rosemary. While this treatment will feel divine for many pets, always check with your vet before applying any new topical products to your fur friends. Magical malachite Friendship Collar Paws down, this is one of the cutest  gifts  you can give this holiday season: matching vegan, cruelty-free, scratch-resistant bracelet and collar sets for human/canine duos. Buy a set for you and your dog, and extra sets to give as gifts to all your dog-loving friends. For every  Friendship Collar  set you buy, the maker will donate six pounds of food to shelter animals. Eco-friendly treats Is your best friend food-motivated? V-Dog makes  cruelty-free treats  that include pumpkin, carrots, broccoli and spinach in the ingredients list.  Pet Naturals of Vermont  has a whole line of treats that do double duty: tasting delicious while cutting down on Fluffy’s hairballs and easing hip and joint pain. Images via Unsplash, LooHoo, Package Free Shop, Pixabay, Eco Girl Shop, WoodLeon, Whom Home, BestFriendBeauty, Friendship Collar and V-Dog

Here is the original post: 
Treat Fido and Fluffy with these eco-friendly holiday gifts for pets

5 Easy Solutions to Narrow the Green Gap in Your Home

November 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 5 Easy Solutions to Narrow the Green Gap in Your Home

“Green” has quickly become one of today’s hottest buzz words, … The post 5 Easy Solutions to Narrow the Green Gap in Your Home appeared first on Earth 911.

Go here to read the rest:
5 Easy Solutions to Narrow the Green Gap in Your Home

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 3249 access attempts in the last 7 days.