8 Ways to Green Your Water

August 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

You H2O it to yourself to read this – get it? The post 8 Ways to Green Your Water appeared first on Earth911.com.

More:
8 Ways to Green Your Water

Architect Stefan Hitthaler breathes new life into a 1970s UFO-inspired chalet

August 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

A UFO-inspired house may be one of the last things you’d expect to find in a quaint Italian village, but this Space Age mountain chalet fits surprisingly well in its forested surroundings. Charmed by the unusual home, which had been designed by Innsbruck-based architect Josef Lackner in 1973, Bruneck-based architect Stefan Hitthaler has given the five-sided building a modern refresh and expansion for better usability and comfort. The remodeled chalet is used as a holiday retreat that can sleep multiple guests. When architect Stefan Hitthaler was commissioned to renovate the UFO House, the dwelling had fallen into disrepair and was in sore need of an amenities update. Hitthaler decided to replace all the siding and introduce a fresh material palette mainly comprising untreated larch , fir and gray-waxed concrete. The home, set on six low concrete pillars, was also expanded to include a more spacious outdoor deck and a retracting spaceship-inspired ladder entrance. The relatively compact mountain chalet offers just over 61 square meters of space across a main floor and smaller basement level, which is why the architect opted for an open plan . Full-height glazing that frames landscape views and opens up to a balcony also brings plenty of natural light into the main room, which is anchored by a fireplace and two large beds on either side. Behind the fireplace is a small kitchen unit and two extra, smaller bedrooms. A bathroom has been added to the lower level, which is finished in waxy gray concrete. Related: Off-grid UFO home is completely powered by wind, water and sun “The project provides better usability and optimized living comfort thanks to an increase in thermal insulation and the installation of floor heating with heat pump and ventilation,” said Stefan Hitthaler of the energy-efficient upgrades to the UFO House. “All these solutions generate a greater energy savings. These interventions haven’t compromised the idea and the structural quality of the outer shell and the interior.” + Stefan Hitthaler Images via Harald Wisthaler

Read more: 
Architect Stefan Hitthaler breathes new life into a 1970s UFO-inspired chalet

Treehaus combines contemporary design and passive energy in the Utah forest

August 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

If you were lucky enough to have a treehouse as a child, you understand the thrill of having the wonders of nature at your fingertips instead of admiring them from afar. Now you can live every day in that wonderland in a home just put on the market in Summit Park, Utah. Treehaus, a beautiful passive house from Park City Design + Build , blends into the nearby forest, allowing residents to return to nature in an energy-efficient setting. With three diverse levels strategically stacked on top of each other among a pine grove, the home’s black cedar cladding makes for a low profile against the lush greenery. The simple, efficient lines of the exterior design veil a surprisingly roomy 3,643-square-foot interior. In stark contrast to the home’s exterior, the interior features austere white walls in every room, complemented by light oak floors. Black stair rails, fixtures and trim provide dramatic contrast and exposed stainless steel ceiling beams illuminate the ashen palette. Related: Stay in a dreamy treehouse inside an ancient English forest The sprawling, open floor plan includes four bedrooms, four baths, and an oversized kitchen with expansive counters, cabinets and a large island that serves double-duty as an informal eating hub. Custom staircases separate the three levels. The top story houses the home’s main suite, which nestles gently into the forest’s green foliage. Two decks attached to the front of the house and a terrace in the back make communing with nature easy. Additional balconies beckon off the other three bedrooms and first floor kitchen and living room. + Park City Design + Build Images via Kerri Fukui/City Home Collective

The rest is here:
Treehaus combines contemporary design and passive energy in the Utah forest

Take a trip to the shire in this tiny ‘Hobbit House’ on wheels

August 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Not only have we found the cutest hobbit tiny home on wheels , but there’s a whole gaggle of these cute dwellings at the WeeCasa Tiny House Resort set in picturesque Colorado. Guests can choose from 22 tiny homes , but the Hobbit House is by far the most adorable, complete with a circular front door, ivy-clad roof and hand-crafted wood features. The WeeCasa Resort is located in Lyons, Colorado , just outside of Rocky Mountain National Park. The resort’s tiny homes, which range in size between 135-400 square feet, are set up neighborhood-style to foster a sense of community among the guests. Visitors can enjoy a peaceful stroll around the neighborhood, a dip in the nearby river or a hiking or biking excursion through the beautiful surrounding landscape. Related: Spend the night in this magical Hobbit House tucked into the Washington shire Each tiny house in the resort is different, with its own distinctive charm and character. The 170-square-foot Hobbit House is one of the most popular choices by far. Built by Incredible Tiny Homes , this four-person guesthouse immediately gives off “shire” vibes, which are enhanced by the cedar shake siding and an ivy-covered roof. The entryway is through a large round door — of course — that opens up into a cozy, wood-clad interior. The fairytale structure has a spacious kitchen and living area punctuated with more circular windows. For sleepy hobbits, there is a queen-sized bed in the sleeping loft at the far end of the tiny home. The retreat even houses a small felt Frodo, who can often be found perched in the windows or lounging on the couch. An electric fireplace heater keeps the space nice and toasty while guests enjoy a nice warm cup of mead. + WeeCasa Tiny House Resort + Incredible Tiny Homes Via Tiny House Talk Images via WeeCasa Tiny House Resort

Read more from the original source:
Take a trip to the shire in this tiny ‘Hobbit House’ on wheels

Locally salvaged zinc panels clad a seaside getaway in Chile

August 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Designed by Chilean architecture firm Ortuzar Gebauer Arquitectos , the Coo Lodge is a seaside getaway that is tied into the surrounding landscape history with its weathered zinc cladding. The reclaimed metal plates, sourced from old construction sites, have been oxidized to a reddish color similar to the color of the ground. Located on the beach with spectacular views of the sea and distant volcanoes, the building was constructed to feel like an extension of the landscape. The zinc -clad Coo Lodge is located in Queilen, a tiny town in the southern Chilean archipelago of Chiloé known for its beaches and beautiful views. The architects looked to the landscape for much of the inspiration for the house design and even delved into the early history of the original inhabitants, nomadic navigators known as ‘Chonos or Payos’ who made their living from the sea. “To discover their vestiges was to discover their vernacular condition, it was to discover a culture,” the architects wrote. “The above opened our senses to work on the pre-existing.” The architects also divided the site into three main parts: a green field near the main road, a grass-covered rocky “intermediate level” and the white sand beach that was formerly covered by a large growth of weeds before the designers cleared out the space. Because the 1,722-square-foot Coo Lodge was placed on the “intermediate level,” the architects created a series of block-y volumes — six of which house bedrooms and one larger structure for the communal living areas — to complement the large sculptural rocks. The buildings are elevated  and fan out across the landscape, and they are connected by outdoor walkways. Large windows punctuate the sea-facing facades. Related: Chile’s rustic Casa Pollo is made from recycled zinc plates and reclaimed wood “The enclosures being separated are intimate, typical of the visitors who keep them in their status as a nomad in the place,” the architects continued. “A great volume is the space of encounter, public space, exposed, that around the fire and the kitchen , invites to live according to the logic of the rural ensemble in Chilo.” + Ortuzar Gebauer Arquitectos Images by Federico Cairoli

Read the rest here:
Locally salvaged zinc panels clad a seaside getaway in Chile

This tiny Victorian cottage on a wildflower meadow belongs in a fairytale

August 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Living in a tiny home doesn’t have to mean sacrificing style. Case in point: this beautiful Victorian tiny cottage located in Monroe, Maine . The home is less than 430 square feet but big on character. Not only is the two-story tiny home gorgeous and elegant, but it also sits on four acres of an open meadow covered in wild flowers and lined with orchards. The best news is that this charming cottage can be yours for just $125,000 . The magical cottage, which was built in 1986, is truly an outstanding example of tiny home design done right. The Victorian-style exterior, complete with a corner turret, is clad in light blue siding with white trim and nicely contrasted by dark shingled roofs. A stone path leads up to the home’s front door, which is shaded by a large tree. Related: Kettal and Patricia Urquiola create Kettal Cottage: a part tiny house, part tent escape The tiny cottage is two floors, with the living space, bathroom and kitchen on the ground floor and the bedroom on the second floor. The interior is flooded with natural light  thanks to an abundance of large windows, which also provide stunning views of the expansive greenery that surrounds the home. Although the home is compact, its beautiful setting adds a lot of value. The Victorian  cottage sits on a natural lot of land that includes flower gardens, stone walls and fruit trees and is just steps away from a waterfall that feeds into a nearby stream. The waterfall is so close that the future residents will be able to listen to the sounds of the water as they drift off to sleep. As an added bonus, there is also another small cottage, complete with a  composting toilet , on the land. It would need a little bit of work, but this additional tiny cottage could be a perfect space for an artist studio or guest quarters. + Berkshire Hathaway Via Tiny House Talk Images via Berkshire Hathaway

Here is the original: 
This tiny Victorian cottage on a wildflower meadow belongs in a fairytale

Solar-powered home takes advantage of Silicon Valleys mild climate

August 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

San Francisco-based architecture firm Bohlin Cywinski Jackson recently completed the Los Altos Residence, a modernist family home for a couple who strives to be environmentally conscious. Located in Los Altos in northern Silicon Valley , the home and adjacent guesthouse boasts an energy-efficient design that follows passive cooling principles and is equipped with renewable energy systems. The low-slung residence mimics the Northern California ranch-style home with a distinctly modernist slant marked with clean lines and a restrained material palette. The Los Altos Residence comprises two buildings: a main residence of 4,151 square feet and an additional 479-square-foot guesthouse. The existing landscape played a large part in the design of the site-specific home, which is organized around a mature Japanese maple tree. The windows and doors were strategically placed to frame views of the diverse landscaping surrounding the home and to take advantage of cooling cross breezes. “The home is detailed with a natural, crisp palette, reflecting the client’s fondness for simplicity and tranquility,” explains Bohlin Cywinski Jackson in its project statement. “A variety of woods, including Douglas fir , western red cedar, and gray elm, are used throughout and provide a sense of warmth directly contrasted by exposed structural steel, polished concrete floors, and a textured concrete fireplace. A locally sourced Claro walnut table, measuring 10-feet in length, creates a comfortable dining space, its live edge balancing the clean lines of the living room. Additional furnishings reinforce the client’s desire for a minimalist environment.” Related: This modern vacation home embraces indoor-outdoor living in Ontario In addition to passive cooling and use of the stack effect in the double-height living space, the energy-conscious Los Altos Residence is also equipped with photovoltaic and domestic hot-water rooftop panels to offset electricity consumption. Energy is further conserved with a highly insulated building envelope and large overhangs that block unwanted solar gain. Concrete radiant floors also provide added warmth in the winter season. + Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Images by Nic Lehoux

Go here to read the rest: 
Solar-powered home takes advantage of Silicon Valleys mild climate

A minimalist home in Portugal emphasizes stunning valley views

August 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Architects and their clients are often surprised when their visions don’t quite align after the initial ideas are transformed into renderings, specs and floor plans. But when MJARC Arquitectos met with a couple who wanted a house in Douro Valley in Marco de Canaveses,  Portugal , it was a euphoric meeting of minds. All parties shared the same vision — a pristine and absolute articulation of minimalist architecture. With a setting as picturesque as this one, highlighted by sweeping views of the rolling curves of vineyard -covered valleys and the mesmerizing Douro River, the goal was to leave the undulating landscape unscathed. The house was constructed as close to the terrain as possible, with the upper levels providing more encompassing vistas. The “crouching building” concept drove the choices for the size, design and exterior accouterments of the home. Related: Derelict property transformed into a vibrant, sunny hostel in Portugal The interior is warm and inviting, with an open floor plan that gracefully flows from room to room, clad in a combination of deep wood shades, rustic stones, concrete and stark, black accents. The pool is designed to give the illusion of it flowing directly into the river. The views from every level focus on the surrounding forest and foliage and achieves the symbiosis with nature desired by all parties. To accommodate the tastes of the homeowners’ visitors throughout the year, MJARC Arquitectos incorporated sustainable construction and energy sources as well as clever spaces that could easily be adapted for multiple uses. The roof is even topped with lush greenery, a welcome addition to the home. The combined efforts on this project not only thrilled the architects and clients — the house was recently nominated for an award in the Home category by the World Architecture Festival , where it is one of 18 finalists. The winner will be announced at ceremonies scheduled for November 28-30 in Amsterdam. + MJARC Arquitectos Images via João Ferrand

See the rest here:
A minimalist home in Portugal emphasizes stunning valley views

The Goldtree House is designed for sustainable family living

August 3, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Goldtree House is designed for sustainable family living

When kids hit their teens, your house suddenly feels smaller. The atmosphere is hectic, groups of friends traipse in and out, and parents often retreat to a bedroom for peace and quiet. However, one clever family with teenage twins got ahead of the curve, asking Hartree and Associates Architects to remodel their home to accommodate these changes and create a private apartment for the parents down the road. The owners of the Goldtree House, a 1950s home in East Fremantle, Australia, wanted the renovation to include ample space for their children to entertain guests, as well as help the house withstand frequently inclement weather. They also needed a revamp that adhered to their firm budget while providing the best views of nearby Fremantle Harbor. The first step was removing the existing roof and constructing a new top story. The added level includes a new master bedroom, plenty of living space, and a kitchen with sweeping views all around. The owners envision this level as their private “apartment” many years in the future. The ground level is devoted to the needs and tastes of teenagers and their friends. The internal spaces were simplified and revamped to include ample views of the surrounding landscape as well as optimum sunlight and a current of internal breezes. The floor plan easily flows from the entryway to the great room for adolescent games and socializing. It also provides easy access to the terrace, thriving garden and pool, the latter of which was designed to eliminate the need for a privacy fence. Related: A 1950s house receives a bioclimatic renovation in Mexico Besides a photovoltaic solar panel array , the home also includes eco-friendly water and energy management through natural air ventilation, energy-efficient fixtures and equipment, and native garden plants that require minimum watering. Two wind turbines and storage batteries for power are also part of the home’s green technology. The twins were involved in the renovation from inception through completion, which gave them a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment. They proudly share the outcome with their friends. + Hartree and Associates Architects Images via Robert Frith

Here is the original: 
The Goldtree House is designed for sustainable family living

Architects build their own rammed-earth office around existing trees

August 3, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Architects build their own rammed-earth office around existing trees

Paraguay-based design firm  Equipo de Arquitectura has created a number of innovative structures, but when it came to constructing their own office space, its designers decided to go back to basics. The team has just unveiled the Caja de Tierra – a beautiful,  rammed-earth construction that was built around existing trees. When the architects set out to build a new office space for themselves, they decided to focus the design on nature, with the goal of fostering a sense of connection to the earth. As the structure’s concept began to take form, the architects decided they would employ just three basic materials: earth, wood and glass. Related: Striking rammed earth home blends into the hills of Santa Fe The architects built the cube-like structure on-site themselves. First, they had to sieve the earth to eliminate rocks, roots and large particles. Once the soil was “clean”, they mixed it with cement and placed it in mold-like modules. The mixture was then pummeled with a pressure tool to get rid of air and pack it tightly into place. When the elongated, 30-cm-thick earthen blocks  reached a sufficient consistency, the team placed them on top of each other, forming four beautiful rammed-earth walls. The result? A gorgeous facade with red and orange tones that blends seamlessly into the natural surroundings. Contrasting with the all-earthen walls is a large glass skylight, cut into one of the corners in order to flood the interior with natural light – a feature that also reduces the structure’s energy usage. In keeping with the environmentally-conscious design, all of the furniture and doors were made out of reclaimed wood. With a lot surrounded by greenery, the team did what it could to protect the existing plants growing on-site. Specifically, the architects designed the layout to leave space for two existing trees . A flame tree is framed in an all-glass box that juts into the interior while a majestic guavirá tree holds court right in the middle of the office space. + Equipo de Arquitectura Via Archdaily Photography by Leonardo Mendez and Federico Cairoli via Equipo de Arquitectura

Read more from the original source:
Architects build their own rammed-earth office around existing trees

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 954 access attempts in the last 7 days.