War ruins are reborn as a sustainable home in Lebanon

October 11, 2018 by  
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Having survived the Lebanese Civil War as a torture and detention center for militia forces, The House With Two Lives has a colorful past to say the least. So when Lebanese design practice Nabil Gholam Architects was asked to renovate the structure — originally built as a resort building in the 1930s — the firm took its time to sensitively pick apart the site’s history and breathe new and positive life into the property. Described as a “difficult exorcism,” the design process saw the reuse of the historic ruins and the insertion of a brand new home celebrating nature and sustainable design, from rainwater harvesting systems to passive cooling strategies. Located near the Lebanese mountain village of Bois de Boulogne and surrounded by beautiful pine forests, the House With Two Lives was designed to blend in with its idyllic surroundings. To “cleanse the house of its troubled history,” the architects introduced new plant growth to camouflage the building into the landscape, from vines that climb over the ruins to more than 1,000 pine trees planted in the garden, including umbrella pines, oak trees, cork trees, Lebanese cedars and more. The site has also gained a new rose garden. The theme of regrowth and revival has also been applied to the architecture of the house, which comprises a three-story main house of 2,000 square meters as well as an annex and guard house of 850 square meters. The new additions to the existing 1,500-square-meter stone ruins of the main house were articulated as a series of Corten steel -clad boxes that will develop a patina over time and are perforated with tree-shaped patterns. Sustainability guided the design of the renovated structure, which is built with high-performance insulation and follows passive solar strategies. The home also harvests solar energy for winter heating and uses rainwater collection systems. Related: Modern alpine home is built on the ruins of an old rustic structure “The case of this house is as dreadful as it is beautiful,” said the architects, who spent months stripping the existing structure of leftover torture devices, black ashes and graffiti. “The story behind it and the testimonials backing it makes it stand as a powerful message. The House With Two Lives restores faith in man’s will to fight and is with no doubt an example of an architectural work of high precision.” + Nabil Gholam Architects Photography by Geraldine Bruneel, Nabil Gholam, Joe Kesrouani and Richard Saad via Nabil Gholam Architects

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War ruins are reborn as a sustainable home in Lebanon

War ruins are reborn as a sustainable home in Lebanon

October 11, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Having survived the Lebanese Civil War as a torture and detention center for militia forces, The House With Two Lives has a colorful past to say the least. So when Lebanese design practice Nabil Gholam Architects was asked to renovate the structure — originally built as a resort building in the 1930s — the firm took its time to sensitively pick apart the site’s history and breathe new and positive life into the property. Described as a “difficult exorcism,” the design process saw the reuse of the historic ruins and the insertion of a brand new home celebrating nature and sustainable design, from rainwater harvesting systems to passive cooling strategies. Located near the Lebanese mountain village of Bois de Boulogne and surrounded by beautiful pine forests, the House With Two Lives was designed to blend in with its idyllic surroundings. To “cleanse the house of its troubled history,” the architects introduced new plant growth to camouflage the building into the landscape, from vines that climb over the ruins to more than 1,000 pine trees planted in the garden, including umbrella pines, oak trees, cork trees, Lebanese cedars and more. The site has also gained a new rose garden. The theme of regrowth and revival has also been applied to the architecture of the house, which comprises a three-story main house of 2,000 square meters as well as an annex and guard house of 850 square meters. The new additions to the existing 1,500-square-meter stone ruins of the main house were articulated as a series of Corten steel -clad boxes that will develop a patina over time and are perforated with tree-shaped patterns. Sustainability guided the design of the renovated structure, which is built with high-performance insulation and follows passive solar strategies. The home also harvests solar energy for winter heating and uses rainwater collection systems. Related: Modern alpine home is built on the ruins of an old rustic structure “The case of this house is as dreadful as it is beautiful,” said the architects, who spent months stripping the existing structure of leftover torture devices, black ashes and graffiti. “The story behind it and the testimonials backing it makes it stand as a powerful message. The House With Two Lives restores faith in man’s will to fight and is with no doubt an example of an architectural work of high precision.” + Nabil Gholam Architects Photography by Geraldine Bruneel, Nabil Gholam, Joe Kesrouani and Richard Saad via Nabil Gholam Architects

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War ruins are reborn as a sustainable home in Lebanon

There’s an ‘uprooted’ house floating in the middle of this German square

July 24, 2015 by  
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Construction sites are unconventional spaces for art exhibits, but it is the perfect spot for Leandro Erlich ’s “Pulled Up by the Roots” installation in Germany. Featuring a house suspended from a crane  with visible roots dangling from beneath it, the spectacle serves as a reminder of the connection and presence of Earth and nature, even in the midst of manmade chaos. Read the rest of There’s an ‘uprooted’ house floating in the middle of this German square

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There’s an ‘uprooted’ house floating in the middle of this German square

Day-lit House With an Empty Lot is Split Down the Middle for an Independent Couple in Japan

November 16, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Day-lit House With an Empty Lot is Split Down the Middle for an Independent Couple in Japan Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: compact footprint , Daylighting , eco design , fujisawa , House With an Empty Lot , Japan , Japanese design , ON Design , skylights , sustainable design , tiny homes , Urban design

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Day-lit House With an Empty Lot is Split Down the Middle for an Independent Couple in Japan

Spooky Gue(oh)st House Draped in a Melted White Veil Opens in France

October 4, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Spooky Gue(oh)st House Draped in a Melted White Veil Opens in France Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Berdaguer & Péjus , eco design , france , green design , green renovation , Gue(oh)st House , halloween , house with a spooky white veil , Marcel DuChamp , prison , spooky house , sustainable design

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Spooky Gue(oh)st House Draped in a Melted White Veil Opens in France

Nike’s Stunning Flyknit Feather Pavilion Lights Up the Night at Beijing Design Week

October 4, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Nike’s Stunning Flyknit Feather Pavilion Lights Up the Night at Beijing Design Week Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: arthur huang , Beijing Design Week , eco design , Feather Pavilion , green design , kinetic installation , kinetic sculpture , miniwiz , Nike Flyknit Collective , sustainable design

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Nike’s Stunning Flyknit Feather Pavilion Lights Up the Night at Beijing Design Week

House With Balls: Louis Kahn Meets Paul Rudolph via Matharoo Associates

January 26, 2011 by  
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image credit Matharoo Architects Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan of Architizer calls Matharoo Associates House with Balls “a veritable children’s treasury of the weirdest, coolest architectural photography we’ve seen in a while (cattle, camels, fish, lights facing concrete walls, is that someone up there on the roof? Is that a cow up there?).” I won’t get started about the who…

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House With Balls: Louis Kahn Meets Paul Rudolph via Matharoo Associates

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