This alpine hotel is built with modular rooms stacked together

April 13, 2018 by  
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This minimalist and modular hotel in the mountain resort of Lenzerheide, Switzerland offers a streamlined and modern take on the traditional mountain chalet. Carlos Martinez Architekten designed Hotel Revier with prefabricated room modules, each with a glazed end wall and lined in natural, unfinished plywood. The long and narrow larch-clad building comprises three rectangular segments angled to follow the shoreline of the Heidsee and positioned to face panoramic mountain views. An exercise in minimalism, the sports-oriented Hotel Revier is “reduced to the bare essentials,” wrote Carlos Martinez Architekten. “The hotel unites the atmosphere of a mountain chalet with the liberating feeling of a campervan and the functionality of a ship’s cabin. All rooms face West toward the water and bring to mind the image of a VW bus: one park at the lake opens the tailgate and feels a sense of freedom.” Related: Hotel Tverskaya Transforms a Disused Building in Moscow with Sleepbox Modules The hotel’s communal core, made up of the lobby, bar, and restaurant, occupies the ground floor, while the four floors with a total of 96 rooms are stacked above. The 160-square-foot standard rooms, prefabricated and fully equipped offsite, were assembled into a metal framework. Each standard room includes a wall-to-wall bed that can be folded up into a sofa, TV, floor-to-ceiling window , hooks, narrow ventilation wings, a deep windowsill, and a heating unit for drying gloves and clothing. Hotel Revier also includes four barrier-free and 29 triple-bed rooms, also prefabricated. By stacking the modules side by side, the architects create a “double-wall” effect with the advantage of improved acoustic insulation. + Carlos Martinez Architekten Via ArchDaily Images © Marc Lins, Hannes Thalmann, and Revier Mountain Lodge

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This alpine hotel is built with modular rooms stacked together

Sleep beneath the Milky Way in Bubble Domes in Ireland

April 6, 2018 by  
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Want to wake up in the great Irish outdoors without compromising comfort? These luxurious Bubble Domes at Finn Lough promise a cozy night beneath the stars with luxurious touches to boot. Located on a 45-acre peninsula in Fermanagh, Northern Ireland , these transparent domes offer 180-degree views of the forest as well as bespoke, Scandinavian-inspired interiors. Designed and built by Dome Experience , the Bubble Domes at Finn Lough are one of four accommodation types offered by the family-run resort. The futuristic domes , which sleep two, are perfect as a romantic getaway and digital detox destination—the domes do not have wifi or cell service. Kept inflated with an air pressure system, each dome features underfloor heating, a four-poster bed, Nespresso coffee machine, and a smaller annex bubble housing the ensuite bathroom. Related: CasaBubble’s inflatable prefab domes let you enjoy 360 degree views of nature in comfort Guests can choose between the standard Forest Bubble Dome or the larger Premium Bubble Dome, which includes a tub and other special furnishings. Each dome is accessed via a private path. Pricing for the Bubble Domes start at £245 ($345) a night . + Finn Lough Via Dwell Images via Finn Lough

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Steven Holl Architects unveils designs for geothermal-powered Angers Collectors Museum

March 19, 2018 by  
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Steven Holl Architects and Compagine de Phalsbourg have won an international design competition for the new Angers Collectors Museum (Le Musée des Collectionneurs) and hotel in the heart of Angers , France. Envisioned as a new cultural gateway, the sculptural museum is undeniably modern yet pays homage to its historic settings and derives inspiration from the nearby historic Chateau d’Angers located across the river. Geothermal heating and cooling will be used in the museum to reduce the building’s energy footprint. Built of exposed titanium white concrete, the 4,742-square-meter museum has a striking sculptural appearance that will be set within a series of reflecting pools—filled with recycled water—in a nod to the site’s riverine history. The museum will be connected to a linear hotel clad in clear and translucent glass for a mosaic-like effect inspired by the 14th century Apocalypse Tapestry on display in Chateau d’Angers. Related: Gigantic Slugs Made From 40,000 Recycled Plastic Bags Crawl Through the Streets of Angers, France In addition to the museum and hotel’s prime riverside location on the east bank of the Maine River, their proximity to Le Quai, the city’s largest theater , further cements the buildings’ future as the cultural heart in Angers. The museum will share a rooftop restaurant with the hotel as well as a public sculptural garden at the ground level. + Steven Holl Architects Images via Steven Holl Architects

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This modern hiking hotel blends into the dark alpine forests of Italy

February 23, 2018 by  
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The darkened wood façade of the award-winning Hotel Bühelwirt is tinted to complement the moody, dark green of the surrounding forest. Pedevilla Architects designed the hotel as an extension of the breathtaking alpine landscape in South Tyrol, Italy. While designing the space, the architects sought to create harmony with the environment and give every room a breathtaking view of the landscape. The 20-room hotel references traditional hiking hotels of the region. Rectangular forms meet an asymmetrical saddle roof and feature diagonally protruding bay windows that offer expansive views of the mountains. Each room in the hotel features stunning views, strengthening the connection between guests and the surrounding landscape. Related: 17th-century farm transformed into amazing hotel in the hills of Norway The minimalist interior features accents that add warmth and a feeling of coziness to the space, while creating focus on the outdoor environment. This is achieved through the use of locally sourced materials such as larch wood . Handcrafted copper lamps and locally manufactured curtains reflect a strong regional connection between the design of the hotel and its locale. + Pedevilla Architects Via Dwell Photos by Gustav Willeit

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This modern hiking hotel blends into the dark alpine forests of Italy

Snhetta unveils designs for worlds first energy-positive hotel in the Arctic Circle

February 13, 2018 by  
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Snøhetta has revealed designs for the world’s first energy-positive hotel in the Arctic Circle —an incredible proposal given the region’s below-freezing temperatures. Located at the foot of Svartisen, Norway’s second largest glacier, the circular Svart hotel will offer panoramic 360-degree views of the fjord and use solar panels to produce more energy than it needs. The sustainable building is being developed in collaboration with Arctic Adventures of Norway, Asplan Viak and Skanska. Set partly on shore at the foot of the Almlifjellet mountain, Svart also extends into Holandsfjorden fjord’s crystal-clear waters where kayakers can paddle beneath the circular building . Elevated off the ground for low-impact, the hotel’s V-shaped timber structure is a nod to the local vernacular architecture, more specifically the form of the A-shaped fiskehjell, a wooden device used for drying fish and the local fisherman “rorbue” house. A boardwalk built into the timber structure serves as a walkway for guests in summer or as boat storage in winter. “Building in such a precious environment comes with some clear obligations in terms of preserving the natural beauty and the fauna and flora of the site,” said Founding Partner at Snøhetta, Kjetil Trædal Thorsen. “It was primordial for us to design a sustainable building that will leave a minimal environmental footprint on this beautiful Northern nature. Building an energy positive and low-impact hotel is an essential factor to create a sustainable tourist destination respecting the unique features of the plot; the rare plant species, the clean waters and the blue ice of the Svartisen glacier.” Related: Jaw-dropping hotel made of ice and snow opens in Sweden The new hotel aims to reduce its yearly energy consumption by approximately 85% as compared to an equivalent hotel built to modern building standards in Norway. Snøhetta hopes to reduce the hotel’s carbon footprint by topping the rooftop with solar panels produced with clean hydro-energy and by using materials with low-embodied energy like timber over energy-intensive materials such as structural steel and concrete. Extensive site mapping informed the placement and design of the hotel to best exploit solar energy during the day and minimize unwanted solar gain. + Snøhetta Images via Snøhetta

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Snhetta unveils designs for worlds first energy-positive hotel in the Arctic Circle

BIG and CRA break ground on greenery-infused Singapore skyscraper

February 13, 2018 by  
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Bjarke Ingels Group and Carlo Ratti Associati have broken ground on a new nature-infused skyscraper that’s bringing Singapore a step closer to its ‘City in a Garden’ vision. Located in the heart of the financial district, the 280-meter-tall Singapore Tower will be one of the city’s tallest and offer a mixed-use program including an “office of the future,” residences, and retail. Greenery is integrated into the multiple parts of the building from a public rainforest plaza and park on the ground floor to a multi-level green oasis visible from the outside. Commissioned by CapitaLand, the 51-story high-rise comprises a podium of retail and restaurants beneath eight floors of serviced residences. Residents will enjoy access to a wide variety of facilities and landscaped spaces such as an outdoor pool, jacuzzi, jogging track, and barbecue pits. Offices will occupy the building’s top 29 floors and look out to panoramic views of the Singapore River and Marina Bay. Separate lobbies will service the offices and residences. Sensors, Internet-of-Things and artificial intelligence are embedded into the smart tech building for the benefit of tenants. “BIG’s design seeks to continue Singapore’s pioneering vertical urbanism with the 280m tall diverse community of places to work, live and play inside as well as outside,” said Bjarke Ingels. “At multiple elevations, the facade peels open to reveal urban oases for its users and the surrounding city – animating the elegant smoothness of modern architecture with the ubiquitous tropical nature.” Singapore Tower’s glass-and-steel facade appears to pull open at the base, core, and rooftop to reveal glimpses of tropical greenery within. Related: A rainforest-like green heart grows within Singapore’s Marina One Lush landscaping can be enjoyed at the ground floor park that transitions into the 19-meter-tall City Room in the tower’s mixed use podium. A four-level Green Oasis occupies the core of the building—between the residences and offices—and houses a 30-meter open-air garden with winding walkways, diverse seating, jungle gym, treetop cocoons, sky hammocks, and a cafe. The Singapore Tower is expected for completion in 2021. + Bjarke Ingels Group + Carlo Ratti Associati Images via Bjarke Ingels Group, Exterior images by Bjarke Ingels Group and VMW

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Tokyo capsule hotel gets a Finnish-inspired refresh and sauna

January 22, 2018 by  
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Capsule hotels are commonplace in Tokyo, but the recently renovated ºC (Do-C) Ebisu hopes to stand out from the pack with its contemporary Finnish-inspired refresh. Designed by Tokyo-based practice Schemata Architects , the renovated hotel is one of the newest offerings by capsule hotel chain 9h (nine hours). Though guests won’t have much room in their tiny capsule units, they do have access to a roomy Finnish-inspired sauna. 9h hotels typically redesign and build their capsule hotels from scratch, but decided to take the renovation route with ºC (Do-C) Ebisu. Schemata Architects was asked to preserve the existing capsule units but otherwise gut the interior and overhaul the exterior. The building was also retrofitted with new saunas . “In Japan, people often stereotypically associate capsule hotels with saunas due to the conventional style of capsule hotels in the past,” wrote the architects. “The existing building was actually not equipped with saunas, but we intentionally recreated the stereotypical image by adding saunas there, while eradicating the conventional impression, to establish a powerful combination of capsules and saunas representing the identity of ºC.” Related: Kyoto’s Futuristic Nine Hours Capsule Hotel Offers a First Class Sleeping Experience in Tiny Pods The eight-floor capsule hotel’s narrow building facade was repainted in a rusty red hue, matching the color of the anti-corrosive paint applied to the structural steel members. Natural timber is used throughout the interior, while clear fiber-reinforced plastic, chosen for waterproofing purposes, can be seen in the space connecting the shower room and sauna. The project was completed December 2017 and is located a one-minute walk away from Ebisu Station. You can make bookings online ; the capsule hotel is open to both men and women. Per the name, each stay at the minimalist hotel is only nine hours: one hour to get ready for bed, seven hours of sleep, and one hour before checkout. + Schemata Architects Images by Nacasa & Partners

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Recycled materials make up this quirky solar-powered hotel in West Africa

November 17, 2017 by  
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A beautiful sun-soaked retreat on Cape Verde’s island of Sao Vicente prides itself on sustainability. Ramos Castellano Arquitectos designed the Terra Lodge Hotel using recycled and found materials, water recycling systems, and a rooftop solar array . The hotel draws the eye with its gridded timber frame, constructed from unfinished African wood, that partially encloses private verandas. Built predominately from lime-plastered concrete, the Terra Lodge Hotel’s five structures are rotated to optimize views and cross breezes. The hotel includes 12 rooms and a suite, a breakfast room, a lap pool, and a large outdoor terrace on the roof of an old green colonial house that now houses the owner’s tourist agency. The architects used found materials in construction, such as the recycled metals from petroleum barrels for the gate and the locally sourced rocks for the walls. Related: Hotel Shabby Shabby: Pop-Up Hotel Offers Recycled Rooms Built for Under €250 “Every solution is simplified adapting to the island lack of material and resources, simple and essential for satisfying basic needings, not for ephemeral fashion,” wrote the architects. “Almost everything is handmade, employing people from the neighborhood, from the floor finishing to the furniture, trying to distribute the economy of the building construction in the social environment.” The architects also designed the furnishings and light systems with locally handcrafted and recycled wood. + Ramos Castellano Arquitectos Via ArchDaily Images © Sergio Pirrone

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Recycled materials make up this quirky solar-powered hotel in West Africa

Jordanian repurposes old VW Beetle into ‘world’s smallest hotel’

November 14, 2017 by  
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One enterprising man deep in the Jordanian desert is proving that when it comes to hotel design , it’s the spirit that counts. Mohammed Al Malaheem, 64, has converted an old VW Beetle into a mini hotel for guests visiting his hometown of Al Jaya. Although it may not technically be the world’s smallest hotel, it certainly runs large when it comes to hospitality. A former tour guide for the area, Malaheem (who goes by the name Abu Ali) and his daughter revamped the tiny vehicle into a hotel room in 2011 after his retirement. The roadside hotel was designed to provide a nice place for visitors to the largely deserted village to feel comfortable. After working on the car’s design, Ali converted an adjacent cave into a reception area named “Baldwin’s Grotto”, complete with a bathroom, kitchen, and gift shop. Related: These campers made from 1970’s VW Bugs are the cutest things ever Ali told CNN that the mini hotel project was mainly inspired by his love of his hometown, “This village is my homeland, I was born here, I grew up here, I lived here. I wanted to start a project that improves its situation and places it on the tourism map, because it truly overlooks some of the most beautiful scenery in the region.” Although the village may not be on top of many travel bucket lists, Al Jaya does have its charms. The area is located near Al Shoubak, home to the 12th century castle called Montreal. What it lacks in fancy amenities, the hotel more than makes up for in off-grid relaxation, full of peace and quiet, and of course, Malaheem’s warm hospitality. The VW hotel – which charges 40 Jordanian Dinars (approx. $56) for an all-inclusive, one-night stay – can only accommodate two guests at a time, but from the looks of the many “thank you” notes left by previous visitors, the hotel is beloved by many. In fact, Ali’s place has received so many positive reviews that he’s planning to add several more VWs in the future. Via CNN Photography by Anas Al Rawashdeh/Mohammed Al Malaheem

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Jordanian repurposes old VW Beetle into ‘world’s smallest hotel’

Vipp launches very untraditional hotel rooms, starting at 1,000 Euro per night

November 6, 2017 by  
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Danish design brand Vipp just launched its first two hotel rooms that promise the height of luxury design—starting at 1,000 Euros per night. The “very untraditional” hotel are centered on good design and not the typical hospitality experience, which means that in place of room service or a restaurant they’re banking on unique design experiences. The first two rooms of the Vipp hotel are located in a Swedish forest and atop Vipp’s Copenhagen headquarters, with many more planned for the future. While Vipp is best known for their sleek pedal-controlled trash bin, the design brand expanded into the hospitality business after they received a flood of requests to stay at their prototype Shelter, a prefabricated plug and play dwelling created in 2014. Starting this month, the metal-and-glass Vipp Shelter is available for booking and offers 55 square meters of modern cabin space on the forested shore of Sweden’s Lake Immeln. The second destination available is the 400-square-meter Vipp Loft, designed in collaboration with Danish architect David Thulstrup , that’s set above Vipp’s Copenhagen headquarters in an old paperprinting factory. The Vipp Shelter and Vipp Loft are both outfitted in Vipp home products, but have very different characters. Vipp Shelter, which the firm describes as a “battery-charging station for humans,” is clad in black with felt-lined walls, ceramic tile floor, and full-height glazing overlooking the lake. In contrast, the Vipp Loft is much more urbane, filled with light-toned wood, and decorated with vintage furnishings and contemporary art. A stay at the Vipp shelter is 1,000 euros per night, while the Vipp Loft starts at 2,000 euros per night. Related: The Vipp Shelter is a plug-and-play prefab home that can be placed just about anywhere “Our destinations all share the same goal; we want to invite people to experience firsthand our philosophy of good design in a place out of the ordinary,” says Kasper Egelund, CEO at Vipp. “Our ambition is to have a palette of destinations with rooms curated to people who seek a one-off design experience, or customers who want to try to live with the Vipp kitchen in a home-away-from-home setting. A Vipp kitchen is for life, but you can start with just a weekend.” VIP’s third room, the Chimney House, will open in early 2018 inside a historic water pumping station in northern Copenhagen . + Vipp

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