100% solar-powered Fiji resort combines 5-star luxury with sustainability

June 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Luxury travel doesn’t have to come at the expense of the environment. At Six Senses’ new Fiji Resort , visitors can indulge in five-star comforts and minimize their stay’s carbon footprint. Crafted by Auckland design firm Space Studio , this 24-villa resort on Malolo Island is powered entirely with solar energy and promotes environmental awareness throughout. Opened last month, the Six Senses Fiji comprises 24 villas, two restaurants, a lounge, a library, welcome and guest service areas and a spa. The development will soon include a total of 60 privately owned residences — 11 of which have already been completed. The five-star resort blends contemporary design with elements of traditional Fijian culture, which is celebrated in the handiwork and artwork produced by local villagers, the Rise Beyond the Reef charity and the local material palette of grass cloth wallpaper and timber. In addition to cultural awareness, Six Senses Fiji also turns its spotlight on sustainability. The 100 percent solar -powered resort is equipped with its own water filtration plant on site so that staff can bottle water in glass and eliminate single-use plastic bottles. Reusable containers can be found in places like the on-site gourmet deli, and guests are encouraged to return those containers for reuse. Food waste is turned into compost for the resort’s farm and garden with a worm-based septic system. Recyclable waste is sorted in the resort’s “recycling corner,” after which the items are shipped to Denarau Island on the return barges that bring food supplies twice a week. Related: Experience bliss at a luxury Indian spa nestled in a former coffee estate “We also try to have as little waste as possible by creating a lot of our own homemade tonics and bitters using local produce and shrubs, so there’s no waste to begin with,” said Karen Morris, Six Senses Fiji director of sales and marketing. “We’re growing our own kombucha, so we don’t need to ship it in, and we’re creating our own tepache, a fermented pineapple drink.” A luxurious night at Six Senses Fiji starts at $870. + Space Studio + Six Senses Fiji Images via Six Senses Fiji

Go here to read the rest:
100% solar-powered Fiji resort combines 5-star luxury with sustainability

Foster + Partners turn an office tower into Hong Kongs newest luxury hotel

May 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Foster + Partners turn an office tower into Hong Kongs newest luxury hotel

Foster + Partners transformed a former government headquarters tower into a luxury hotel in Hong Kong , and it has just opened its doors to the public. Located on the southern edge of Central with sweeping views of The Peak, the 336-room hotel — named The Murray — not only includes a striking interior overhaul, but also features new street frontage and green space to reconnect the 25-story tower with the urban fabric. The adaptive reuse project preserved the existing self-shading facade to maximize daylight penetration while reducing solar gain. The office tower, known as the Murray Building, was designed in the 1970s during an era that primarily catered to the automobile. To make the site more pedestrian friendly , Foster + Partners created new street frontage and added landscaped parks on the ground level to remove the site’s road-dominated appearance. Inside the building, the architects replaced the former car park with hotel lobbies and restaurants; transformed the plant room spaces into banquet halls, pools and spas; and turned the upper-floor office spaces into guest rooms. Though dramatic, the transformation from office to luxury hotel was sensitively executed in order to preserve the building’s architectural integrity. The architects also took care to retain the original facade, which earned the structure an Energy Efficient Building Award in 1994. The exterior features deeply recessed windows that are carefully positioned to avoid harsh tropical sunlight. Enlarged insulated glazing units improve energy efficiency , while a new suite of luxury materials create the hotel’s sense of grandeur. Related: Foster + Partners unveils sustainable masterplan for India’s new state capital Luke Fox, the Head of Studio for Foster + Partners, said, “Our design for The Murray creates a dialogue between the old and the new – giving the building a new lease of life and a renewed purpose, with a unique sense of character that is embedded within the fabric of the building.” + Foster + Partners Images via Foster + Partners , by Nigel Young and Michael Weber

See more here:
Foster + Partners turn an office tower into Hong Kongs newest luxury hotel

Couple builds an ‘Earthship’ tiny home for less than $10K

May 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Couple builds an ‘Earthship’ tiny home for less than $10K

DIY home builds are never easy, and rarely cheap, but one ambitious couple managed to create a beautiful tiny home for under $10,000. Taylor and Steph Bode from Nomadic Roots created their sustainable 560-square-foot ‘Earthship’ mainly using reclaimed and repurposed materials. Inspired by the design principles of visionary architect Mike Reynolds and his company, Earthship Biotecture , the couple focused on creating a sustainable home that would employ passive and sustainable features to stay comfortable throughout the seasons, without air conditioning or heat sources. Related: Firefighter’s self-built tiny house is an earthship on wheels Once they found the perfect lot, the couple moved into a 14′ yurt while they slowly started the building process. To begin the project, they planned the home’s perimeters to maximize its potential thermal mass. Built into a south-sloping hill, the east, west, and north walls are buried underground , insulating the home and providing stable indoor temperatures. According to the owners, “The stylistic elements were secondary to creating a functionally competent structure that was well-suited for its environment.” To create the frame for the house, the couple cut down two young redwood trees from an adjacent grove. The siding and trim is crafted from old redwood fence boards. For the rest of the construction materials, Taylor and Steph scoured various sites to find discarded materials that could be reclaimed . They found new uses for countless thrown-away items such as automobile tires, glass bottles and aluminum cans. All of the home’s windows and doors were salvaged or found for free on Craigslist. Although the majority of the walls are buried, the many repurposed windows help flood the interior with an abundance of natural light . The couple created an earthen floor with a mixture of sand, clay, straw and water. After laying the mixture, they finished it with a hemp oil to create a warm, soft look. The Bodes used reclaimed barn wood for the interior walls, and they made or salvaged all their furnishings. + Nomadic Roots Via Apartment Therapy Photography by Taylor Bode via Nomadic Roots

View post: 
Couple builds an ‘Earthship’ tiny home for less than $10K

UK government wants to ‘eliminate’ wet wipes in plastic crackdown

May 8, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on UK government wants to ‘eliminate’ wet wipes in plastic crackdown

It’s not just plastic bottles and plastic bags clogging waterways — wet wipes are a pervasive problem, and the United Kingdom government is planning to banish them in a plastic waste crackdown. A Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (Defra) spokesperson told The Independent , “As part of our 25-year environment plan, we have pledged to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste, and that includes single-use products like wet wipes.” Many wet wipes, which contain plastic, are still flushed down toilets — and according to the BBC , are behind around 93 percent of sewer blockages in the UK. The Defra spokesperson didn’t say whether or not it would be illegal to sell or buy wet wipes. She did say, “We are continuing to work with manufacturers and retailers of wet wipes to make sure labeling on packaging is clear and people know how to dispose of them properly — and we support the industry’s efforts to make their customers aware of this important issue.” Related: Wet wipe pollution is clogging up riverbeds across the UK The BBC said manufacturers will either have to design wipes free of plastic, or people will have to live without them. They quoted Defra as saying it is “encouraging innovation so that more and more of these products can be recycled and are working with industry to support the development of alternatives, such as a wet wipe product that does not contain plastic and can therefore be flushed.” Besides congesting rivers, wet wipes are also part of so-called fatbergs , or congealed mounds of trash and fat in sewers — and the BBC said fatbergs are mainly comprised of wet wipes. The Independent said there are thought to be at least 12 fatbergs beneath London . Earlier this month, a UK environmental organization revealed over 5,000 wet wipes in a space as big as half of a tennis court near the River Thames . Tens of thousands of the wipes are sold every year in Britain. Via The Independent and the BBC Images via Depositphotos ( 1 , 2 )

See the original post: 
UK government wants to ‘eliminate’ wet wipes in plastic crackdown

Scandinavian-inspired hotel emerges from the lush Costa Rican landscape

May 2, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scandinavian-inspired hotel emerges from the lush Costa Rican landscape

European design elements meet Costa Rican craftsmanship in the newly completed Mint Santa Teresa , a modern hotel set into a steep hillside in Santa Teresa, Costa Rica. San Jose-based architecture firm Studio Saxe completed the upscale hotel for Swedish owners who fell in love with the beautiful area, which has become a hotspot for surfing and yoga. Built to harmonize with the landscape, the hotel is comprised of pavilion-like structures that step down towards the beach. Mint Santa Teresa has multiple spacious,  pavilion -like guest rooms that fully open up to views of the surrounding nature while preserving privacy. Each room comes with a personal terrace overlooking the ocean in front of the hotel, as well as the tropical gardens behind it. Guests also enjoy access to a rooftop terrace with hammocks , lush landscaping, and elevated views. Rattan furniture sourced from the famous crafts town Sarchí is used throughout the hotel, as are locally sourced materials, such as the caña brava grass ceilings and other custom furniture made from  locally sourced wood. An infinity pool and sunset bar are located at the heart of the hotel, in the communal lounge area where the breakfast buffet is served. Related: Costa Rica eco-resort combines jungle yoga with sustainable design “Hotels traditionally became vast objects in the landscape that bear no relation to their surroundings and are devoid of genuine human interaction,” according to architect Benjamin Garcia Saxe. “At Mint, we endeavored to create a contextual design that adapts to its landscape and offers a new type of experience for a breed of traveler seeking authenticity.” + Studio Saxe

Here is the original: 
Scandinavian-inspired hotel emerges from the lush Costa Rican landscape

Thousands of California ‘hipster succulents’ are being stolen in plant poaching crisis

April 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Thousands of California ‘hipster succulents’ are being stolen in plant poaching crisis

The dudleya, a California native succulent , has become a symbol of hipster lifestyle, according to The Guardian . But now so-called plant poachers are stealing the succulent by the thousand to smuggle to buyers in Asia, and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has made several busts this year alone. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.12’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); CDFW wildlife officers have made a series of arrests this year while working to halt a trend of individuals poaching the Dudleya succulent plant on the north coast of California. Posted by California Department of Fish and Wildlife on  Friday, April 6, 2018 Dudleya plants aren’t rare in the Golden State. But they do take years to grow in nurseries. The Guardian said nursery owners said the plants aren’t available in the massive amounts Asian shippers seem to desire. Smugglers are stealing the plants, which have a market value of around $40 to $50 overseas. CDFW warden Pat Freeling, who’s led the plant poaching investigation, told The Guardian, “Right now these plants are a boom in Korea, China, and Japan. It’s huge among domestic housewives. It’s a status thing. It’s become an exotic lotus flower succulent. Someone likened it to the next Pokémon.” Related: Man caught smuggling 51 turtles in his pants pleads guilty An anonymous woman gave Freeling a tip in January; she had been waiting in line at a Mendocino County post office behind a man with dozens of boxes to be sent to Asia. As the man was holding up the line, the woman asked what he was sending and the man said, “Shhhhh, something very valuable.” The CDFW has already made several busts; in a post earlier this month, they said they arrested three people — two from Korea and one from China — and intercepted 1,334 dudleya en route to be shipped. 1,000 more were uncovered in the hotel room of the suspects. In another bust, they recovered 50 succulents; in another, 1,400 dudleya. CDFW said, “The removal of dudleya can result in environmental degradation of habitat and a destabilization of bluffs and cliffs on the coastline.” Multiple volunteers and CDFW staff recently came together to replant around 2,000 dudleya on the cliffs they came from in the Humboldt and Mendocino counties. + CDFW News + California Department of Fish and Wildlife Via The Guardian Image via CDFW News

The rest is here:
Thousands of California ‘hipster succulents’ are being stolen in plant poaching crisis

This alpine hotel is built with modular rooms stacked together

April 13, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This alpine hotel is built with modular rooms stacked together

This minimalist and modular hotel in the mountain resort of Lenzerheide, Switzerland offers a streamlined and modern take on the traditional mountain chalet. Carlos Martinez Architekten designed Hotel Revier with prefabricated room modules, each with a glazed end wall and lined in natural, unfinished plywood. The long and narrow larch-clad building comprises three rectangular segments angled to follow the shoreline of the Heidsee and positioned to face panoramic mountain views. An exercise in minimalism, the sports-oriented Hotel Revier is “reduced to the bare essentials,” wrote Carlos Martinez Architekten. “The hotel unites the atmosphere of a mountain chalet with the liberating feeling of a campervan and the functionality of a ship’s cabin. All rooms face West toward the water and bring to mind the image of a VW bus: one park at the lake opens the tailgate and feels a sense of freedom.” Related: Hotel Tverskaya Transforms a Disused Building in Moscow with Sleepbox Modules The hotel’s communal core, made up of the lobby, bar, and restaurant, occupies the ground floor, while the four floors with a total of 96 rooms are stacked above. The 160-square-foot standard rooms, prefabricated and fully equipped offsite, were assembled into a metal framework. Each standard room includes a wall-to-wall bed that can be folded up into a sofa, TV, floor-to-ceiling window , hooks, narrow ventilation wings, a deep windowsill, and a heating unit for drying gloves and clothing. Hotel Revier also includes four barrier-free and 29 triple-bed rooms, also prefabricated. By stacking the modules side by side, the architects create a “double-wall” effect with the advantage of improved acoustic insulation. + Carlos Martinez Architekten Via ArchDaily Images © Marc Lins, Hannes Thalmann, and Revier Mountain Lodge

Go here to see the original:
This alpine hotel is built with modular rooms stacked together

Sleep beneath the Milky Way in Bubble Domes in Ireland

April 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Sleep beneath the Milky Way in Bubble Domes in Ireland

Want to wake up in the great Irish outdoors without compromising comfort? These luxurious Bubble Domes at Finn Lough promise a cozy night beneath the stars with luxurious touches to boot. Located on a 45-acre peninsula in Fermanagh, Northern Ireland , these transparent domes offer 180-degree views of the forest as well as bespoke, Scandinavian-inspired interiors. Designed and built by Dome Experience , the Bubble Domes at Finn Lough are one of four accommodation types offered by the family-run resort. The futuristic domes , which sleep two, are perfect as a romantic getaway and digital detox destination—the domes do not have wifi or cell service. Kept inflated with an air pressure system, each dome features underfloor heating, a four-poster bed, Nespresso coffee machine, and a smaller annex bubble housing the ensuite bathroom. Related: CasaBubble’s inflatable prefab domes let you enjoy 360 degree views of nature in comfort Guests can choose between the standard Forest Bubble Dome or the larger Premium Bubble Dome, which includes a tub and other special furnishings. Each dome is accessed via a private path. Pricing for the Bubble Domes start at £245 ($345) a night . + Finn Lough Via Dwell Images via Finn Lough

Read more from the original source: 
Sleep beneath the Milky Way in Bubble Domes in Ireland

Steven Holl Architects unveils designs for geothermal-powered Angers Collectors Museum

March 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Steven Holl Architects unveils designs for geothermal-powered Angers Collectors Museum

Steven Holl Architects and Compagine de Phalsbourg have won an international design competition for the new Angers Collectors Museum (Le Musée des Collectionneurs) and hotel in the heart of Angers , France. Envisioned as a new cultural gateway, the sculptural museum is undeniably modern yet pays homage to its historic settings and derives inspiration from the nearby historic Chateau d’Angers located across the river. Geothermal heating and cooling will be used in the museum to reduce the building’s energy footprint. Built of exposed titanium white concrete, the 4,742-square-meter museum has a striking sculptural appearance that will be set within a series of reflecting pools—filled with recycled water—in a nod to the site’s riverine history. The museum will be connected to a linear hotel clad in clear and translucent glass for a mosaic-like effect inspired by the 14th century Apocalypse Tapestry on display in Chateau d’Angers. Related: Gigantic Slugs Made From 40,000 Recycled Plastic Bags Crawl Through the Streets of Angers, France In addition to the museum and hotel’s prime riverside location on the east bank of the Maine River, their proximity to Le Quai, the city’s largest theater , further cements the buildings’ future as the cultural heart in Angers. The museum will share a rooftop restaurant with the hotel as well as a public sculptural garden at the ground level. + Steven Holl Architects Images via Steven Holl Architects

Read more from the original source:
Steven Holl Architects unveils designs for geothermal-powered Angers Collectors Museum

This modern hiking hotel blends into the dark alpine forests of Italy

February 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This modern hiking hotel blends into the dark alpine forests of Italy

The darkened wood façade of the award-winning Hotel Bühelwirt is tinted to complement the moody, dark green of the surrounding forest. Pedevilla Architects designed the hotel as an extension of the breathtaking alpine landscape in South Tyrol, Italy. While designing the space, the architects sought to create harmony with the environment and give every room a breathtaking view of the landscape. The 20-room hotel references traditional hiking hotels of the region. Rectangular forms meet an asymmetrical saddle roof and feature diagonally protruding bay windows that offer expansive views of the mountains. Each room in the hotel features stunning views, strengthening the connection between guests and the surrounding landscape. Related: 17th-century farm transformed into amazing hotel in the hills of Norway The minimalist interior features accents that add warmth and a feeling of coziness to the space, while creating focus on the outdoor environment. This is achieved through the use of locally sourced materials such as larch wood . Handcrafted copper lamps and locally manufactured curtains reflect a strong regional connection between the design of the hotel and its locale. + Pedevilla Architects Via Dwell Photos by Gustav Willeit

Read the original here: 
This modern hiking hotel blends into the dark alpine forests of Italy

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 8981 access attempts in the last 7 days.