Hong Kongs Skypark is an urban oasis for millennials

July 10, 2017 by  
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A gorgeous green oasis has surfaced in one of the world’s most densely populated areas in Mongkok, Hong Kong . New World Development’s Adrian Cheng teamed up with Dutch architecture studio concrete to craft Skypark, an innovative luxury development where like-minded millennials can connect in beautiful co-living spaces. The project’s crown jewel—and the inspiration behind the development’s name—is the unique rooftop park, as well as the rooftop solar and wind turbines. Partially powered by clean energy , Skypark paves the way for local developers to take a more eco-friendly approach in construction. “Inspired by the crowded and narrow streets of Mongkok, where space is limited and people bump into each other, concrete created a place for residents to escape the chaos and for people to truly connect,” wrote the architects, which designed the residential complex with young professionals in mind. “Almost literally, by ‘breaking down the walls’ of a generic clubhouse , an open and transformable public space was made.” Garden designer Adrian L Norman created the Skypark roof garden using principles from New World Development’s Artisanal Movement concept that combines creativity, craftsmanship, and community. The sky park is distinguished by its large lawned garden, called The Lawn, that offers residents the luxury of picnicking next to stunning panoramic views. A wealth of other social spaces are available, including private nooks and an outdoor kitchen with a grill. Below the rooftop garden is The Aurora, a modern clubhouse on the 28th floor with an indoor swimming pool, poolside bar, library, and a gym. The Sky Stairs, a set of oversized steps with colorful cushions that double as seating, connect The Lawn with The Aurora. Related: A Lush Living Wall Skirts Aedas’ New Composite Building in Hong Kong The rooftop wind turbines generate electricity for some of the lighting, while solar energy is used to heat the clubhouse showers. Recycled rainwater is used for rooftop irrigation. The Skypark was completed in March 2017 and comprises mostly studio and one-bedroom apartments. + New World Development + concrete Via Dezeen Images via concrete

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Hong Kongs Skypark is an urban oasis for millennials

Tropical park with native species will add much-needed green space to Hong Kong

January 30, 2017 by  
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The concrete jungle of Hong Kong will soon become a bit greener. Landscape architecture firm Gustafson Porter + Bowman revealed landscape designs for Taikoo Place to create a new public space that will inject much-needed green space to the dense urban environment. The 69,000-square-foot project will promote biodiversity and public awareness of Hong Kong’s local landscapes with the planting of 53 native trees grown specifically for the park. Taikoo Place’s landscape design will offer a sequence of active and passive spaces, from open areas suitable for jazz concerts and markets to more intimate meeting areas. The park spaces will be tied together by large bands of brown and white granite that run through the site, surrounding streetscape, and lobby of one of the development’s planned towers. Taikoo Square, the largest space in the design, comprises water features designed using 3D modeling to introduce dynamic movement and sounds that reference the former Quays that had existed on the site. Densely planted tropical plants and over 70 trees that provide shade and a cooling microclimate will be neatly framed by sculpted stonework. “To promote biodiversity and raise public awareness of Hong Kong’s heritage of Fung Shui woodlands, 53 of the trees are native species , grown specifically for the project,” writes the firm. “Fung Shui woodlands are remnants of native woodlands which are protected from agricultural clearances due to their spiritual significance. At Taikoo Place, these remnant species have found a new home and bring additional natural elements to an otherwise dense urban space.” Related: Glowing bamboo pavilion promotes ecological design in Hong Kong The lush public park is designed as part of the HK$15 billion redevelopment for Taikoo Place spearheaded by Swire Properties. The development’s planned pair of Grade-A office towers, designed by Wong Ouyang, will target LEED Platinum ratings. The towers will be connected by a new elevated walkway designed by Hugh Dutton Associés. The project is slated for completion in 2021. + Gustafson Porter + Bowman Via ArchDaily Images via Gustafson Porter + Bowman

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Tropical park with native species will add much-needed green space to Hong Kong

Plastic ‘tsunami’ trashes Hong Kong beaches

July 11, 2016 by  
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A deluge of garbage is overwhelming Hong Kong beaches. In what some refer to as a trash ‘ tsunami ,’ Hong Kong beaches have seen an estimated six to 10 times the usual amount of trash recently. And most of that garbage is plastic that won’t easily decompose. Trash washing up on beaches isn’t unheard of for Hong Kong, but this amount of trash is abnormal. Lantau Island’s Cheung Sha Beach and Hong Kong Island’s Stanley Beach have seen ” tens of thousands of tons ” of garbage washed ashore in areas where children typically play. Hong Kong’s Environmental Protection Department blames June flooding in China and monsoon winds. Councilor Paul Zimmerman said the trash washed in from illegal and legal dumps in Hong Kong and China. Related: How two amazing teenage girls convinced Bali to ban plastic bags Many think the trash is coming from China as well as Hong Kong because of the trash packaging and labels. Sea Shepherd Hong Kong , a conservation group, points to a dump on the island of Wai Ling Ding. Just south of Hong Kong, the island is administrated by China and home to a dump which Sea Shepherd director Gary Stokes described as a “glacier of trash” that could be flowing downhill into the ocean . An Environmental Protection Department April 2015 report claims Hong Kong ocean trash ” does not constitute a serious problem .” But Coastal Watch , a World Wildlife Fund project, said up to 15,000 metric tons of ocean trash are gathered yearly in Hong Kong. One local described the current issue as ” effectively a solidified ‘oil spill’ of trash/plastic .” One Green Planet writes, “8.8 million tons of plastic” end up in our oceans every year. That trash poses a threat to marine creatures and pollutes the environment, and likely won’t break down for about 1,000 years. Via One Green Planet and CNN Images via Ocean Recovery Alliance Facebook

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World’s oldest panda celebrates with cake and bamboo. Happy Birthday Jia Jia!

July 28, 2015 by  
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Celebrations took place Tuesday, July 28 at Ocean Park in Hong Kong as Jia Jia took her place the Guinness Book of World Records as the oldest living panda in captivity. Jia Jia was presented with a colorful cake of ice and fruit juice, as well as a handful of fresh bamboo shoots to mark the occasion, as her caretakers at Ocean Park noted that she is remarkably active and healthy for a panda of her highly advanced years. Read the rest of World’s oldest panda celebrates with cake and bamboo. Happy Birthday Jia Jia!

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Hong Kong’s Community Green Station blends bamboo screens and shipping containers

May 20, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Hong Kong’s Community Green Station blends bamboo screens and shipping containers Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architectural Services Department , bamboo screens , Community Green Station , contemporary Chinese-style , Hong Kong , modular architecture , open courtyards , prefab architecture , recycled shipping containers , Sha Tin

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Hong Kong’s Community Green Station blends bamboo screens and shipping containers

WING multi-use loft transforms a derelict warehouse into a cultural hub in Hong Kong

April 28, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of WING multi-use loft transforms a derelict warehouse into a cultural hub in Hong Kong Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: derelict warehouse , event space , green renovation , Hong Kong , industrial warehouse , lead , natural light , performance space , Wing loft

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WING multi-use loft transforms a derelict warehouse into a cultural hub in Hong Kong

Poachers in Mozambique are Killing Elephants on an Industrial Scale

September 25, 2014 by  
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The elephant poaching crisis in Africa, fueled in part by demand for ivory in the far east, is getting worse. Environmentalists warn that elephants are being killed on an industrialized scale in Mozambique, where 22 elephants were killed for their tusks in the first two weeks of September alone. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) said organized crime syndicates are slaughtering between 1,500 and 1,800 elephants a year in the east African country. Read the rest of Poachers in Mozambique are Killing Elephants on an Industrial Scale Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Africa , carlos pareira , convention on international trade in engangered species , elephant poachers , elephants , Hong Kong , ivory demand , Ivory Trade , killing elephants , maputo , niassa reserve , poachers , poaching , poaching crime syndicates , poisining drinking water sources , querimbas reserve , Taiwan , tete province , wildlife conservation society

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Fukushima Radiation is Still Wreaking Havoc on Insects Around the Plant

September 25, 2014 by  
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Three years later and the world has slowly returned to normal after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station disaster , but the frightening consequences just keep on going. This time, it’s the insects surrounding the plant that are suffering. Scientists have found that even today, butterfly larvae that feed on radiation-tainted leaves have lower survival rates and physical abnormalities as a result. Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Read the rest of Fukushima Radiation is Still Wreaking Havoc on Insects Around the Plant Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Butterfly nuclear contamination , Fukushima butterflies , Fukushima disaster , fukushima nuclear disaster , Fukushima plant disaster , fukushima radiation , Fukushima radiation butterflies , Fukushima tainted food , Fukushima tainted plants , Fukushima wildlife , nuclear disaster contamination , nuclear disaster wildlife

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Are These Incredible Rice Paddy-Topped Hong Kong Towers the Skyscrapers of the Future?

August 22, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Are These Incredible Rice Paddy-Topped Hong Kong Towers the Skyscrapers of the Future? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: futuristic architecture , futuristic cities , futuristic skyscrapers , gray water system , Hong Kong , Hong-Kong towers , mass transit , mixed-use , rice paddy terraces , skyscrapers , Studio Cachoua Torres Camilletti , studio ctc , urban agriculture , vertical farm

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Are These Incredible Rice Paddy-Topped Hong Kong Towers the Skyscrapers of the Future?

7 Million Bats Killed by White Nose Syndrome: How You Can Help

August 22, 2014 by  
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We’ve reported on the white nose syndrome (WNS) afflicting and killing bats across the U.S. for a few years now. However, the latest estimates from the Defenders of Wildlife put the number of bats killed by the disease near seven million. The population of the northern long-eared bat alone has reduced by almost 99 percent of 2007 levels. In response to the devastation wrought on this particular species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has sadly decided to do nothing for another six months ! Read on to find out how you can help campaign to get this species protected under the Endangered Species Act , before it’s too late. Read the rest of 7 Million Bats Killed by White Nose Syndrome: How You Can Help Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agriculture , bat deaths , bats , Campaign , Defenders of Wildlife , endangered species , fungal disease , habitat loss , northern long-eared bat , petition , US Fish and Wildlife Service , white-nose syndrome

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