HIVE Project proposes biophilic, self-sufficient homes of the future

August 21, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on HIVE Project proposes biophilic, self-sufficient homes of the future

As part of RIBA’s The Home of 2030 design competition, Gianluca Santosuosso Design has created The HIVE Project, a honeycomb-inspired modular solution for lower carbon and low-energy housing. Developed for scalability, the prefabricated timber-framed hexagonal structures would offer residents a great degree of flexibility in customizing their homes throughout different stages of life. The honeycomb-inspired homes are also designed for energy self-sufficiency via renewable energy sources and would be integrated with a water recycling strategy that sustainably handles wastewater as well. The HIVE Project — short for ‘Human-Inclusive & Vertical Ecosystem’ — is a scheme for a circular economy that includes residences as well as shared facilities and onsite food- and energy-generating systems. This “Socio-Eco-System” promotes social cohesion and nature regeneration by incorporating the needs of not only humans, but also the existing site and local flora and fauna. For instance, the ideal starting site for the HIVE Project would be a brownfield that would be rehabilitated and enriched as the community grows. Related: Green-roofed Hive home opens and closes with the sun The hexagonal modules would be prefabricated offsite, where they would be bound together with a mix of locally sourced industrial hemp and natural binder that also provides strong insulation properties. As the community expands, more modules can be quickly added with minimal site impact. At the end of the solar-powered building’s lifecycle, the biodegradable construction materials can be easily disposed of while the remaining elements can be reused for new construction. “HIVE combines the properties of the honeycomb with the shape of the archetypal house and creates a new hybrid type of living space able to merge nature’s efficiency with the ingenuity of humans,” the architects explained. “We intend to provide the HIVE with a wide spectrum of co-owned and shared facilities that will empower individuals, families and communities to be self-sufficient while allowing local authorities and administration to limit the need for public investments. … Using these ‘Kits-of-Parts’, every single plot development will be unique and diverse.” + Gianluca Santosuosso Design Images via Gianluca Santosuosso Design

Continued here:
HIVE Project proposes biophilic, self-sufficient homes of the future

Green-roofed Hive home opens and closes with the sun

July 3, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Green-roofed Hive home opens and closes with the sun

Ahmedabad-based  Openideas Architecture  has completed Hive, an adaptable and sustainable family home that takes inspiration from nature in more ways than one. Located in Vesu, an up-and-coming area in Surat, Gujarat, the luxury home was commissioned by a client who sought to manufacture a flawless home inspired by his work with diamond industry machinery. Informed by extensive solar and site studies, the 600-square-meter residence’s name comes from its honeycomb-inspired facade embedded with solar sensor-based modules that open and close in response to lighting conditions.  When the client approached Openideas Architecture, he brought with him a nearly 90-point brief that covered everything from the structural materials and landscaping to sustainability needs and a year-long solar study. In response, the architects conducted an in-depth analysis of external temperature, humidity, solar radiation, cloud cover and wind pattern conditions that informed the creation of the V-shaped, metal-framed home, which opens up to greenery on multiple levels. In addition to a sunken court and stepped garden, the home features a walkable  green roof  with varying slopes and pockets of greenery dispersed throughout. The most eye-catching feature of the home is the  honeycomb-inspired  facade with a unique opening mechanism engineered to optimize sunlight exposure and thermal comfort levels inside the home. “Analyzed as per the structure, function and mechanism, its design is based on structural strength, transformability and biomimicry ,” noted the architects, who also took inspiration for the modules from the doors of airport buses. As the modules open and close, the sun creates changing patterns of light and shadow indoors.  Related: Honeycomb shading keeps Büro Ole Scheeren’s skyscrapers naturally cool in Singapore In contrast to the metal-clad exterior, the  open-plan  interior includes a mix of wood and stone that create a sense of warmth. As a continuation of the expressive facade, the indoor furnishings and structures feature strong geometric shapes and clean lines.  + Openideas Architecture Images by FABIEN CHARUAU

Read more: 
Green-roofed Hive home opens and closes with the sun

Honeycomb shading keeps Bro Ole Scheerens skyscrapers naturally cool in Singapore

March 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Honeycomb shading keeps Bro Ole Scheerens skyscrapers naturally cool in Singapore

Büro Ole Scheeren recently completed DUO, a pair of sculptural glass towers in Singapore’s Kampong Glam neighborhood. The striking mixed-use development is partly wrapped in a honeycomb facade designed to promote solar shading and to accentuate the curved facades. The concave facades also help create a cooling microclimate by channeling winds towards the lushly landscaped parks below. In addition to its eye-catching appearance, DUO also marks a historic joint venture development between the governments of Malaysia and Singapore. Located between Singapore’s historic Kampong Glam district and commercial Bugis Junction, the twin towers will transform the area into a new civic hub with welcoming public spaces including 24-hour covered and open-air gardens , walkways, cafes, and restaurants. “DUO is about a sense of urban responsibility,” says Ole Scheeren , principal of Büro Ole Scheeren. “It shows how architecture can become a tool of reconciliation within an otherwise disparate and fragmented urban context. The project repairs a broken piece of the city and celebrates public life as the central quality of a socially responsible urban environment.” Related: Ole Scheeren unveils designs for a stunning “sky forest” in Vietnam The taller of the two towers at 186 meters is solely residential and houses 660 units. The second 170-meter-tall building includes corporate offices and a five-star Andaz hotel. Additional commercial areas are placed at the public ground floor that’s entirely passively cooled in an oasis-like environment. + Büro Ole Scheeren Via ArchDaily Images © Iwan Baan

See original here: 
Honeycomb shading keeps Bro Ole Scheerens skyscrapers naturally cool in Singapore

Natural light floods this solar-powered business school in Frankfurt

October 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Natural light floods this solar-powered business school in Frankfurt

According to the World Green Building Council , students score higher on tests and learn up to 26% faster when placed in rooms lit by natural light. Danish practice Henning Larsen Architects took this report to heart when they designed the Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, a light-filled academic building that officially opens today. Powered by solar and wind energy, this sustainability-minded business school takes cues from its urban surroundings while setting “new standards for transparent and open learning in the world of business and finance.” Transparency, community, and visibility are key to the design of the 32,790-square-meter Frankfurt School of Finance & Management . To open the school up the urban setting, the architects centered the development around the Street of Knowledge, a long public atrium that echoes The Zeil, one of Frankfurt’s oldest commercial streets. A wide variety of glass-fronted rooms branch off on either side of the Street of Knowledge in two north-south facing volumes that reinforce the atrium’s likeness to a real city street. Above the third floor terrace, these two parallel buildings turn into five offset towers of flexible 400-square-meter office units. Designed to the DGNB Platinum standard, the school reduces demands of primary energy by 60 percent as compared to the German energy saving ordinance (EnEV) standards. Computer simulations and calculations led the architects to optimize the building shape and facade, constructed with a mix of opaque and transparent elements, early on in the design process to minimize energy needs, solar radiation, noise pollution, and wind. Rooftop photovoltaics and a wind turbine supplement energy needs, while rainwater retention systems slow the effects of intense rainfall. The skylight and careful building orientation maximize access to natural light . Related: Frankfurt named the most sustainable city on the planet “As architects we know that light is one of the most important factors for learning,” said Partner and Design Principal at Henning Larsen, Louis Becker. “It helps improving our focus and performance. My hope and ambition is that the varied daylight-filled spaces we have created for Frankfurt School of Finance & Management will contribute to the important task of educating students that will excel within their field and give something back to the city of Frankfurt.” + Henning Larsen Images by Henning Larsen/Karsten Thormaehlen

Original post: 
Natural light floods this solar-powered business school in Frankfurt

WineHive: Modular 100% Recycled Aluminum Honeycomb Rack “Grows” with Your Wine Collection

October 2, 2014 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on WineHive: Modular 100% Recycled Aluminum Honeycomb Rack “Grows” with Your Wine Collection

If you’re a wine lover tight on living space, you’ll love the space-efficient Winehive, a modular wine rack inspired by the honeycomb structure. Made from 100% recycled aluminum, the WineHive uses a patented interlocking system to fit together an infinite array of honeycomb structures. The stylish rack even packs flat for efficient shipping and can be easily assembled with no tools required. + WineHive The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: honeycomb , honeycomb-inspired , reader submitted content , Recycled aluminum , space efficient , wine , wine rack , winehive

Read more:
WineHive: Modular 100% Recycled Aluminum Honeycomb Rack “Grows” with Your Wine Collection

World’s First Kinetic Energy-Powered Football Stadium Opens in Rio de Janeiro

October 2, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on World’s First Kinetic Energy-Powered Football Stadium Opens in Rio de Janeiro

It’s a strange partnership, but Brazilian football legend Pelé and Shell Oil have teamed up to launch the world’s first player-powered community football field–right in the heart of a Rio de Janeiro slum. Built for the Morro da Mineira community, the innovative sports facility is part of Shell’s ‘Make The Future’ project , which supports ideas that “come from anywhere.” The local pitch was refurbished by Shell using 200 high-tech, underground tiles that capture the players’ kinetic energy , which is then combined with solar energy to power the pitch’s lights and provide a safe and brightly lit community space. Read the rest of World’s First Kinetic Energy-Powered Football Stadium Opens in Rio de Janeiro Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: brazil football , favela , kinetic energy , kinetic football , kinetic football pitch , kinetic power , pele , rio slums , Royal Dutch Shell , Shell , shell oil , solar panels , Solar Power

See more here:
World’s First Kinetic Energy-Powered Football Stadium Opens in Rio de Janeiro

These Amazing Honeycomb Sculptures Are Made by Bees!

August 12, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on These Amazing Honeycomb Sculptures Are Made by Bees!

We all know honeybees are essential to our food system and tireless workers, but who would have thought they could be artists too? Bejing-based artist Ren Ri collaborates with these fascinating insects to create stunning sculptures that incorporate the element of chance. Each sculpture is the result of a joint effort between Ri and a colony of bees he has been keeping since 2008. Read the rest of These Amazing Honeycomb Sculptures Are Made by Bees! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , Artist , bees , beeswax , Beijing , china , chinese , honeybee , ren , ri , sculptures , t museum , yuansu

Here is the original:
These Amazing Honeycomb Sculptures Are Made by Bees!

New Zealand Student Designs Doorless Refrigerator That Saves Energy and Reduces Food Spoilage

October 1, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New Zealand Student Designs Doorless Refrigerator That Saves Energy and Reduces Food Spoilage

Ben de la Roche, an industrial design student at Massey University in New Zealand , has designed a doorless refrigeration wall, called Impress, that prevents food waste and saves energy. De la Roche’s design is a finalist in the 2012 Electrolux Design Lab competition . His refrigerator is one of ten home appliance concepts chosen by Electrolux out of 1,200 entrants and will be on exhibit at the Triennale Design Museum in Milan, Italy, on Oct. 25. Read the rest of New Zealand Student Designs Doorless Refrigerator That Saves Energy and Reduces Food Spoilage Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , ben de la roche , Competition , Design , doorless , eco design , Electrolux , Green Appliances , green design , green home , honeycomb , impress , lab , massey university , New Zealand , refrigeration , refrigerator , Student , sustainable design , wall

Go here to read the rest:
New Zealand Student Designs Doorless Refrigerator That Saves Energy and Reduces Food Spoilage

Bad Behavior has blocked 5554 access attempts in the last 7 days.