Wright-inspired home has trees growing through the roof

April 12, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Moscow-based firm Kerimov Architects has crafted a custom, luxury home for a new villa community in Repino, Leningrad that follows Frank Lloyd Wright’s philosophy of organic architecture by knitting the built environment into the natural landscape. Dubbed the House in Repino, the project, which is still in the design phase, will include nearly 11,000 square feet of living space and focus on minimizing the removal of existing trees. Created to complement a forested landscape, the house will feature a natural materials palette and allow some of the trees to grow through the roof. The conceptual project is proposed for a community in Repino, an area northwest of St. Petersburg on the edge of the Gulf of Finland with a forested environment. To keep the natural landscape intact as much as possible, the villa community has required that all residences be designed in the style of Frank Lloyd Wright, a stipulation that Kerimov Architects has let guide its design process.  Related: Former railway yard to receive a green transformation in St. Petersburg “The house is well integrated into the landscape, practically dissolving into it,” the firm explained. “We’ll try to preserve as many existing trees as possible; some of them will go through the canopies to create a unique rhythm and build a strong relationship between architecture and nature.” The expansive home will be built with a natural materials palette of stone, wood and metal that complements the local environment. The materials will also be encouraged to develop a patina to help blend the home into the landscape over time. To strengthen the connection with nature, the architects have emphasized indoor/outdoor living throughout with the creation of individual terraces for every room, from the primary bedroom and two children’s bedrooms to the spa with a swimming pool, hammam (a Turkish bath) and sauna. The house is organized around a central living space that serves as the “main square” from where all circulation passes through. The site will also include a guest block comprising two guest bedrooms along with a garage housing staff rooms and a workshop. + Kerimov Architects Images via Kerimov Architects

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Wright-inspired home has trees growing through the roof

This will be the largest CLT affordable housing complex in the Netherlands

April 2, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Rotterdam-based architecture office Powerhouse Company has unveiled designs for Valckensteyn, a circular and sustainable building expected to become the largest timber-built affordable housing complex in the Netherlands. Commissioned by housing corporation Woonstad Rotterdam, the pioneering, 12-story project will feature 11 stories built of cross-laminated timber without the use of adhesives to allow the building to be demounted and reassembled elsewhere as needed. Proposed for the post-war Rotterdam neighborhood of Pendrecht, the 40-meter-tall Valckensteyn will occupy the site of a residential complex that was demolished a decade ago. Due to Valckensteyn’s relatively lightweight timber build as compared to steel-and-concrete construction, the architects will be able to repurpose the old building’s foundations — a sustainable design decision that helps to significantly reduce the project’s carbon footprint . Related: Self-sufficient floating office building for GCA will take anchor in Rotterdam For stability, the affordable housing complex will comprise a concrete ground floor and core. The ground-floor lobby will be clad in travertine — a post-war material with strong ties to the neighborhood — and house a large, inviting space with what the architects hope will be “the most beautiful bicycle storage in Rotterdam.” Cross-laminated timber construction will be exposed in the above floors, where all 82 homes will enjoy connections to the outdoors via floor-to-ceiling windows and timber-clad, west-facing balconies. A lush landscaping plan designed by LAP Landscape & Urban Design will surround the building and stimulate biodiversity. The carpark will also integrate cement-free paving stones and water filtration systems to take on the appearance of a “green carpet.” “With project Valckensteyn, Woonstad set out the challenge to develop a responsible and sustainable housing supply for middle-income families,” said Robbert Groeneveld, senior project manager at Woonstad Rotterdam. “The desire of Woonstad for a wooden building has been developed into an integrated design where sustainability, housing comfort and nature inclusivity come together.” Construction on Valckensteyn is expected to start in January 2022. + Powerhouse Company Images via Powerhouse Company

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This will be the largest CLT affordable housing complex in the Netherlands

Green-roofed Swiss homes promote solar via 65 degree rotation

March 30, 2021 by  
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In the Swiss municipality of Bussigny, Crissier-based architecture practice  Bertola & Cie – SIA  has completed the 65 Degree Group Housing project, a collection of low-energy housing units that are deliberately oriented at 65 degrees to optimize solar collection and to ensure private garden spaces for every dwelling. Created as an “alternative to densification,” the housing complex consists of a mix of simplex and duplex typologies that cater to a variety of residents across different generations. In addition to  solar  panels, the project further avoids dependence on fossil fuels and promotes healthy living with the inclusion of two air-to-water heat pumps, green roofs and a double-flow air mechanical ventilation system for reducing micropollutants.  Completed in 2020 after three years of development, the 65 Degree Group Housing project in West Bussigny was created as part of a larger development scheme to introduce 3,000 inhabitants to the area by 2030. At the heart of the architect’s design is the desire to create a village-like  community  where each resident can enjoy an outdoor balcony and green space for winter gardening.  “The architectural concept rigorously follows the will to mark volumes plastically in a suite or a repetition of units voluntarily marked on the street side so that the future inhabitants identify their dwellings not with a housing bar but with small houses of 3 levels joined together,” the architects said of their design intent. “The building thus develops linearly and parallel to the street over a distance of almost 100m. A grid structures the project and is reflected in the structure of the building for the stairwells and is identified by the structural entablature of the in-situ and  prefabricated  concrete terraces.” Related: Experimental prefab home eschews fossil fuels in Geneva Metal railings and clinker  brick  help break up the concrete facade along the southwest side of the housing complex, while light-toned wood surfaces line the light-filled interiors.  + Bertola & Cie – SIA Photography by Mathieu Gafsou

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Green-roofed Swiss homes promote solar via 65 degree rotation

Supporting multimodal public transit in a post-pandemic future

March 30, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Supporting multimodal public transit in a post-pandemic future Shin-pei Tsay Tue, 03/30/2021 – 01:45 This article first appeared on Meeting of the Minds. Cities have been severely impacted by COVID-19 on a number of fronts, and it has laid bare the severe disparities that result from ever-dwindling budgets. The pandemic has also dramatically changed how we experience the urban environment and required us to re-envision how people navigate and interact with their locales. On a regional basis, commutes to central business districts have dropped dramatically, while surrounding town centers, however small they may be, have gained more activity. For the privileged, who have the ability to shelter-in-place and are supported by flexible work-from-home policies, trips have become more concentrated near their homes and rarely reach beyond neighborhood amenities. As a result, open-street networks have blossomed to allow more space for walking and biking, and cities have pivoted to allow restaurants to expand outdoor dining and retail areas into the public right-of-way (ROW). As a fundamental public service, public transit should be conceived as a scalable, resilient and adaptive system … A map released by Lime , a scooter-share company, showed that over the summer, trips have become more concentrated within neighborhoods, rather than sprawling across the city. Meanwhile, Apple Mobility Data showed that private driving returned to pre-COVID levels, after a brief reprieve in April 2020, while transit ridership is still well below normal. It is clear that this crisis has affected communities in different ways. While central business district commutes might have fallen during the pandemic, cross-town trips persisted, and these are more representative of essential workers’ routes. Cities have adjusted their transit systems, cutting some routes in order to ensure more resources for higher volume routes or contracting out late night or expanded service areas in order to ensure that all customers can be continuously served. These changes in transportation patterns should inform how we analyze and address old problems. A longstanding challenge has been how to meet the growing transportation demand across an entire region and during traditionally off-peak times, while also ensuring that neighborhoods, town centers and other nodes outside of the central business district can be supported with sustainable mobility options. Historically, and more than ever today, the most convenient way to travel within a region is by private car. But, as we look forward to a post-pandemic public realm, could emerging mobility technologies help? More than ever, urban transit services are in need of sustainable and affordable solutions to better serve all members of our diverse communities, not least among them those that are traditionally car-dependent. New mobility technologies can be a potential resource for local transit agencies to augment multi-modal connectivity across existing transit infrastructures. As we all witnessed in the last decade, technological innovation (such as transportation network companies and micro-mobility) has triggered a profound transformation of the urban mobility ecosystem, enabling new shared, on-demand and multi-modal transportation options. By being open to new technologies in the realms of both operations and vehicles, transit agencies can establish a more resilient and sustainable urban mobility ecosystem and even remove some friction in payment and trip-planning. We envision a new decentralized and distributed model that provides multi-modal access through nimble and flexible multi-modal Transit Districts, rather than through traditional, centralized and often too expensive Multi-modal Transit Hubs. Working in collaboration with existing agencies, new micro-mobility technologies could provide greater and seamless access to existing transit infrastructure, while maximizing the potential of the public realm, creating an experience that many could enjoy beyond just catching the next bus or finding a scooter. So how would we go about it? Step 1: Identify an area of the city with the highest concentration of transit services (local bus stops, light rail, etc.). For many communities, multi-modal transit services, when provided, come in the form of uncoordinated schedules, infrequent service, and physically disjointed and often unsafe stops located across multiple city blocks. While such areas are served by a certain level of multi-modal transit, the physical conditions in these public realms make the user experience unappealing for most, which results in low transit ridership, a deserted public realm and an increase car traffic (along with attendant pollution). Step 2: Define the most convenient path to access each transit mode available within walking or biking distance. What are the most trafficked and convenient routes to get from one mode to another for a local transit rider? Can we determine an area within walking or biking distance that includes the most comprehensive range of local transit options available? And are there specific landmarks, destinations and ground floor activities that could enhance these commutes? Step 3: Provide the glue. Provide micro-mobility services and enhanced public realm solutions that enable easier, more convenient and more desirable access to local transit. Imagine an open-air concourse: an area of the city geared to best serve pedestrians and transit commuters alike, where wider sidewalks clearly and intuitively lead you from one transit mode to another; where shared bicycle and e-scooter services are readily accessible near each local transit stop and have safe and dedicated lanes. This would be an area of the city with existing landmark destinations, active ground floors and tailored wayfinding strategies are all coordinated to support a convenient and attractive mode transfer; where each single strategy that best serves the commuter also has positive outcomes for local residents and businesses by way of providing a more vibrant, pedestrian-oriented and safe public realm. The measures listed above range from low-cost, temporary solutions to permanent, long-term investments, and this range is key to a step-by-step implementation approach that should benefit communities with limited financial resources. To start, temporary parklets, paired with shared bike and e-scooter docking stations, could be next to key local transit stops, serving commuters and providing opportunities to engage with existing ground-floor businesses. An easily identifiable network of paths comprised of easy to deploy low-tech way-finding solutions and dedicated micro-mobility lanes could allow commuters to intuitively find their way to the next stop. Tactical urbanism strategies, many of which we have seen deployed in cities as a response to the current health crisis, have demonstrated how big changes can happen with small budgets when there is the will and the support of local communities. In the long term, access to efficient multi-modal services and the resulting vibrant public realm could represent a catalyst for new urban development infill to support long term capital investments.   As the network expands beyond the central district, there are opportunities to meet demand more easily, particularly through the use of on-demand, shared transportation that is integrated with fixed route transit. Beyond the initial identification of one area that has a concentration of transit and micro-mobility, there may be several nodes throughout a region that have been reinvigorated post-COVID, and thus could benefit from the distributed transit network model as well. This coincides with shifts away from traditional “hub-and-spoke” transit models and towards an approach that allows greater lateral movement outside the city center. Imagine regions that are no longer concentrated around a single anchor of the central business district, but that have multiple anchor districts that connect to one another. And within those nodes, many points of connection could allow people to move around freely along an enhanced public realm. Crises expose and deepen underlying societal inequity. Urban residents are more than ever relying on the public realm to access jobs and services, conduct a healthy lifestyle and nurture social relations. The current crisis is causing us to reconsider both the nature of transit and the role of the public realm. As a fundamental public service, public transit should be conceived as a scalable, resilient and adaptive system that helps communities where they are, from large cities to small towns; a system that relies on affordable and easy to deploy solutions that is at the foundation of more equitable and thriving urban communities. Pull Quote As a fundamental public service, public transit should be conceived as a scalable, resilient and adaptive system … Contributors Luca Giaramidaro Gerry Tierney Topics Transportation & Mobility Cities Infrastructure COVID-19 Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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Supporting multimodal public transit in a post-pandemic future

Supporting multimodal public transit in a post-pandemic future

March 30, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Supporting multimodal public transit in a post-pandemic future Shin-pei Tsay Tue, 03/30/2021 – 01:45 This article first appeared on Meeting of the Minds. Cities have been severely impacted by COVID-19 on a number of fronts, and it has laid bare the severe disparities that result from ever-dwindling budgets. The pandemic has also dramatically changed how we experience the urban environment and required us to re-envision how people navigate and interact with their locales. On a regional basis, commutes to central business districts have dropped dramatically, while surrounding town centers, however small they may be, have gained more activity. For the privileged, who have the ability to shelter-in-place and are supported by flexible work-from-home policies, trips have become more concentrated near their homes and rarely reach beyond neighborhood amenities. As a result, open-street networks have blossomed to allow more space for walking and biking, and cities have pivoted to allow restaurants to expand outdoor dining and retail areas into the public right-of-way (ROW). As a fundamental public service, public transit should be conceived as a scalable, resilient and adaptive system … A map released by Lime , a scooter-share company, showed that over the summer, trips have become more concentrated within neighborhoods, rather than sprawling across the city. Meanwhile, Apple Mobility Data showed that private driving returned to pre-COVID levels, after a brief reprieve in April 2020, while transit ridership is still well below normal. It is clear that this crisis has affected communities in different ways. While central business district commutes might have fallen during the pandemic, cross-town trips persisted, and these are more representative of essential workers’ routes. Cities have adjusted their transit systems, cutting some routes in order to ensure more resources for higher volume routes or contracting out late night or expanded service areas in order to ensure that all customers can be continuously served. These changes in transportation patterns should inform how we analyze and address old problems. A longstanding challenge has been how to meet the growing transportation demand across an entire region and during traditionally off-peak times, while also ensuring that neighborhoods, town centers and other nodes outside of the central business district can be supported with sustainable mobility options. Historically, and more than ever today, the most convenient way to travel within a region is by private car. But, as we look forward to a post-pandemic public realm, could emerging mobility technologies help? More than ever, urban transit services are in need of sustainable and affordable solutions to better serve all members of our diverse communities, not least among them those that are traditionally car-dependent. New mobility technologies can be a potential resource for local transit agencies to augment multi-modal connectivity across existing transit infrastructures. As we all witnessed in the last decade, technological innovation (such as transportation network companies and micro-mobility) has triggered a profound transformation of the urban mobility ecosystem, enabling new shared, on-demand and multi-modal transportation options. By being open to new technologies in the realms of both operations and vehicles, transit agencies can establish a more resilient and sustainable urban mobility ecosystem and even remove some friction in payment and trip-planning. We envision a new decentralized and distributed model that provides multi-modal access through nimble and flexible multi-modal Transit Districts, rather than through traditional, centralized and often too expensive Multi-modal Transit Hubs. Working in collaboration with existing agencies, new micro-mobility technologies could provide greater and seamless access to existing transit infrastructure, while maximizing the potential of the public realm, creating an experience that many could enjoy beyond just catching the next bus or finding a scooter. So how would we go about it? Step 1: Identify an area of the city with the highest concentration of transit services (local bus stops, light rail, etc.). For many communities, multi-modal transit services, when provided, come in the form of uncoordinated schedules, infrequent service, and physically disjointed and often unsafe stops located across multiple city blocks. While such areas are served by a certain level of multi-modal transit, the physical conditions in these public realms make the user experience unappealing for most, which results in low transit ridership, a deserted public realm and an increase car traffic (along with attendant pollution). Step 2: Define the most convenient path to access each transit mode available within walking or biking distance. What are the most trafficked and convenient routes to get from one mode to another for a local transit rider? Can we determine an area within walking or biking distance that includes the most comprehensive range of local transit options available? And are there specific landmarks, destinations and ground floor activities that could enhance these commutes? Step 3: Provide the glue. Provide micro-mobility services and enhanced public realm solutions that enable easier, more convenient and more desirable access to local transit. Imagine an open-air concourse: an area of the city geared to best serve pedestrians and transit commuters alike, where wider sidewalks clearly and intuitively lead you from one transit mode to another; where shared bicycle and e-scooter services are readily accessible near each local transit stop and have safe and dedicated lanes. This would be an area of the city with existing landmark destinations, active ground floors and tailored wayfinding strategies are all coordinated to support a convenient and attractive mode transfer; where each single strategy that best serves the commuter also has positive outcomes for local residents and businesses by way of providing a more vibrant, pedestrian-oriented and safe public realm. The measures listed above range from low-cost, temporary solutions to permanent, long-term investments, and this range is key to a step-by-step implementation approach that should benefit communities with limited financial resources. To start, temporary parklets, paired with shared bike and e-scooter docking stations, could be next to key local transit stops, serving commuters and providing opportunities to engage with existing ground-floor businesses. An easily identifiable network of paths comprised of easy to deploy low-tech way-finding solutions and dedicated micro-mobility lanes could allow commuters to intuitively find their way to the next stop. Tactical urbanism strategies, many of which we have seen deployed in cities as a response to the current health crisis, have demonstrated how big changes can happen with small budgets when there is the will and the support of local communities. In the long term, access to efficient multi-modal services and the resulting vibrant public realm could represent a catalyst for new urban development infill to support long term capital investments.   As the network expands beyond the central district, there are opportunities to meet demand more easily, particularly through the use of on-demand, shared transportation that is integrated with fixed route transit. Beyond the initial identification of one area that has a concentration of transit and micro-mobility, there may be several nodes throughout a region that have been reinvigorated post-COVID, and thus could benefit from the distributed transit network model as well. This coincides with shifts away from traditional “hub-and-spoke” transit models and towards an approach that allows greater lateral movement outside the city center. Imagine regions that are no longer concentrated around a single anchor of the central business district, but that have multiple anchor districts that connect to one another. And within those nodes, many points of connection could allow people to move around freely along an enhanced public realm. Crises expose and deepen underlying societal inequity. Urban residents are more than ever relying on the public realm to access jobs and services, conduct a healthy lifestyle and nurture social relations. The current crisis is causing us to reconsider both the nature of transit and the role of the public realm. As a fundamental public service, public transit should be conceived as a scalable, resilient and adaptive system that helps communities where they are, from large cities to small towns; a system that relies on affordable and easy to deploy solutions that is at the foundation of more equitable and thriving urban communities. Pull Quote As a fundamental public service, public transit should be conceived as a scalable, resilient and adaptive system … Contributors Luca Giaramidaro Gerry Tierney Topics Transportation & Mobility Cities Infrastructure COVID-19 Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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Supporting multimodal public transit in a post-pandemic future

Passive House-certified residence frames ski resort views in Utah

March 29, 2021 by  
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When a family decided to relocate from Silicon Valley to the Utah ski town of Park City, they tapped local design studio Klima Architecture to realize their dream of an energy-efficient home. Known for its carbon-efficient designs, the firm exceeded expectations with its design of the Meadows Haus, a Passive House-certified home with a 10 kW solar shade canopy, airtight construction and recycled and low-VOC materials throughout. The handsome, modern home also emphasizes indoor/outdoor living with rooftop decks and expansive, triple-pane windows that frame southern ski mountain views. Set on a slope nearly 7,000 feet above sea level, the 5,120-square-foot Meadows Haus features an upside-down layout that places the five bedrooms on the lower two floors and the communal areas on the topmost level to take advantage of elevated landscape views. Massive lift-and-slide glass doors seamlessly connect the upper living spaces to rooftop decks partly shaded by a solar canopy . Related: This will be the world’s largest Passive House-certified office building To help blend the expansive building into the landscape, the architects wrapped the bulk of the building’s 14-inch-thick, double-stud exterior walls in shou sugi ban charred wood. Quartzite stone walls used for part of the exterior base also extend into the home to create a seamless transition between indoors and out. A natural materials palette and large, glazed openings emphasize the connection to the outdoors. “Mountain views surround this simplified structure, allowing landscaping and architecture to flow into each other,” explained the architects, who designed for minimal thermal bridging and high-performance insulation for minimal heating and cooling in the home. “The clients’ goal was to achieve as near net-zero or net-positive as possible. We chose PHIUS+ Certification to help guide those goals. Utilizing WUFI passive, we dialed in the thermal envelope and accompanying assemblies to achieve that goal.” + Klima Architecture Photography by Kerri Fukui via Klima Architecture

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Passive House-certified residence frames ski resort views in Utah

Kiribati Floating Houses address rising waters and land limitations

March 25, 2021 by  
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Architectural design takes all forms, with a focus from the ground up. But UOOU, an Amsterdam- and London-based design practice, came up with an architectural proposal that doesn’t consider the ground at all. Instead, the team focused on creating a housing solution for a group of atolls floating in the South Pacific Ocean, somewhere between Hawaii and Australia. Gianluca Santosuosso and Eri Pontikopoulou, with consultation from Matthias Kimmel, came up with the sustainable urban planning concept, which addresses the need for controlled growth over time. The area is known as the Republic of Kiribati. The problem is rising waters and limited landmass; the solution is floating structures. Related: Sneci houseboat leaves no footprint while floating on Lake Tisza The overall blueprint for the community resembles a tree, with the town center being the trunk while the housing units make up the branches. These units are focused on not only providing shelter but communing with the surrounding elements of nature. The designers kept the division between outdoors and inside thin, with openings to enjoy sunlight, the sky and the view of the Pacific Ocean from inside. Locally sourced, natural materials , particularly wood, are used to honor the culture and the oceanscape. In the center of each housing pod group is a versatile, open-air space for meeting the needs of the community. The land on an otherwise floating structure can house gardens, animals or pools for fish farming. The area offers protection from the corrosive effects of the surrounding waters while providing the opportunity to grow food and raise animals that are essential to the residents. The primary source of electricity comes from photovoltaic panels placed on slanted roofs of the homes. In addition to harvesting energy from the sun, the tilted roofs act as a source of rainwater collection. The water runs through enclosed pipes for maximum collection efficiency and is then stored in tanks below the homes. Although the floating houses would be connected to a larger community, the solar and water systems allow them to be more self-sufficient and even contribute to the neighbors as needed.  The Kiribati Floating Houses concept is presented by UOOU Studio, which said, “Our work focuses on architecture that connects man-made environments with nature, putting eco- and human-oriented design at the core of our mission.” + UOOU Studio Images via UOOU Studio

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Kiribati Floating Houses address rising waters and land limitations

19th-century Catalan ruins are revived into a self-sufficient home

March 24, 2021 by  
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Spanish architecture firm Andrea Solé Arquitectura has given new life to the ruins of Can Tomeu, a historic Catalan building from the 1800s that is now a modern, self-sufficient home. In addition to sensitively restoring and reinforcing the remaining walls from the original construction, the architects expanded the building footprint with an annex and inserted site-sensitive materials that imbue the home with a sense of warmth. The house has also been outfitted with solar panels, diesel tanks and rainwater harvesting and graywater systems for off-grid use. Located at the entrance of the Parc Natural de Garraf just outside of the town of St Pere de Ribes, Can Tomeu was originally used for agricultural and stone-crafting purposes for the Masia Corral d’en Capdet. Although the building was later abandoned and deteriorated into ruins comprising only bearing walls, Can Tomeu was classified as a Cultural Asset of Local Interest (BCIL), a designation that requires the preservation of the building’s remaining elements. Despite the strict regulations and the poor conditions of the ruins, the architects took on the challenge by carefully rehabilitating the original walls and expanding the footprint by 30%. Related: Old ruins are transformed into a cozy, off-grid guesthouse in France The architects used iron mesh and concrete reinforcement to repair and join the original stone walls. Concrete was also used to raise the height of the existing walls and form a new roof structure. In contrast, the exterior walls of the new annex are rendered as smooth, white surfaces. Large, timber-framed windows punctuate both the old and new construction to visually tie the buildings together, bring a sense of warmth into the home and frame exterior landscape views. The light-filled interiors match the minimalist design approach of the exteriors with a simple materials palette that includes ceramic tiling to evoke a Mediterranean character. “The performance represents a second life for the building, rediscovering the existing interior spaces of clear and powerful geometry that after the intervention constitute a new spatial experience,” the architects noted. + Andrea Solé Arquitectura Photography by Adria Goula via Andrea Solé Arquitectura

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19th-century Catalan ruins are revived into a self-sufficient home

EconOdome offers versatile, DIY dome home kits

March 24, 2021 by  
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Illinois-based designer and builder Wil Fidroeff has been helping people build their own dome homes for the past 30 years. His company, Faze Change Produx, creates six models of 10-sided DIY dome home building kits utilizing wood and thermoplastic polyolefin, a type of single-ply roofing material that is low-cost and highly durable. The EconOdome frame and triangle panel kits come pre-cut and partially assembled with detailed instructions; the company even offers personal consultation if necessary. According to Fidroeff, EconOdome homes are built similarly to conventional homes, starting with the foundation and main floor. Next, the vertical walls are constructed, followed by the roof frame. Once the walls are up, 130 triangular roofing elements connect to form the domed top. The dome’s 10 equally sized sides make it easier to keep everything organized. Related: Permaculture design expert Matthew Prosser builds a family dome home “Our two most popular frame kit types are the ‘T-Beam’ frame kit, which features an exposed wood interior, and, the more economical ‘Basic’ frame kit. The third type of frame kit is called the ‘Double Dome,’” Fidroeff told Inhabiat. “A Double Dome frame kit can consist of two 2×4 Basic EconOdome frame kits (one dome inside a larger dome). Or, a Double Dome can consist of a 2×4 exterior Basic EconOdome frame kit plus an interior T-Beam EconOdome frame kit. EconOdome frame kits are most often used to build a two-story home above a 10-sided perimeter riser wall.” Parts in the frame kit are precisely cut to fit exactly and minimize construction waste . The wood includes pre-drilled holes for stainless steel screws and caps. A 26-foot fully insulated model runs about $18,000, although the company also offers cheaper options with its smaller models. The 26-foot model spans just over 800 square feet, featuring two stories with a fully equipped kitchen on the first floor as well as a bedroom on the top. The top floor has room for a half-bath and space for an office or storage. Available colors range from white, tan and light gray, while the interiors are finished with exposed wood. A smaller option, the 13-foot Little Dome , keeps the signature, 10-sided design but cuts down the number of rooftop triangles to 40. People who live in tropical climates can opt for hurricane panels made with three layers of 3/4-inch plywood and an apex vent to ventilate heat and moisture. + EconOdome Via Tiny House Talk Images via Wil Fidroeff

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EconOdome offers versatile, DIY dome home kits

4 Zero-waste Indoor Plant Fertilizers

March 23, 2021 by  
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Plants vitalize our homes and offices. They filter toxins from the air we breathe and… The post 4 Zero-waste Indoor Plant Fertilizers appeared first on Earth911.

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4 Zero-waste Indoor Plant Fertilizers

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