A 1928 Spanish bungalow gets some high-tech, energy-efficient upgrades

November 5, 2018 by  
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This incredibly charming Spanish bungalow in San Jose, California might have been built in 1928, but the 759-square-foot home has been retrofitted with some seriously high-tech features to convert it into a modern, energy-efficient powerhouse. While retaining some of its original features, the home was upgraded with rooftop solar panels and an electric vehicle charging port. Best of all, this bungalow just went on the market, meaning all of this energy-efficient cuteness can be yours for  $798,000 . Located on a corner lot with a large backyard, the two bedroom, one bath Spanish bungalow is a beautiful space with lots of character. The interior is bright and airy, with high ceilings and plenty of windows. To give the home a modern makeover, the interior and exterior were repainted and new tiles floors were installed in the kitchen and bathroom. Although the renovation process was focused on modernizing the living space, the home’s original wood floors, stained glass windows and wood-burning fireplace were retained. Related: An old bungalow is transformed into an award-winning home with a modern extension To create an energy-efficient space , the home was retrofitted with several modern amenities. The roof is home to new solar panels, and there is a charging port for electric vehicles. The backyard was also given a resilient makeover with drought-tolerant landscaping and mature trees. The calming outdoor area will allow the new homeowners to enjoy a brand new hot tub, which sits next to a serene seating area covered by a pergola. The charismatic  cottage is within walking distance from downtown San Jose and historic Japantown, where the new homeowners can enjoy the many shops, markets and eateries. The home is also just one mile from the proposed BART Station slated to open in the near future. + Coldwell Banker Photography by f8 Media via Coldwell Banker  

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A 1928 Spanish bungalow gets some high-tech, energy-efficient upgrades

This groovy ‘Sculpture Home’ in California can be yours for just $1.4 million

August 2, 2018 by  
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If you’re in the market for an extraordinary home just steps away from the Pacific Ocean, this unique modernist home can be yours for a cool $1.4 million . The curvaceous monolithic dwelling, which was designed by a landscape architect in 1969, is a truly unique space. With its continuous flowing curves that wind from the exterior to the interior and various periscope-like lookouts, the home’s design gives off a quirky yet tranquil atmosphere. Located between Monterrey and Santa Cruz and just steps away from the beach, the home has a striking modernist style and all-white facade, enhanced with various periscope-like lookouts that jut out from different angles around the structure. A 5,000-square-foot garden oasis,  landscaped with winding paths and drought-resistant plants, only adds to the home’s allure. Related: Unique asymmetrical home in the Netherlands takes a novel approach to sustainability The interior space continues with a whimsical but sophisticated design that makes its 700 square feet seem much larger. The compact space exhibits expert craftsmanship throughout, from its smooth concrete floors and handmade glass tiles to the eye-catching stainless steel and glass staircase that leads to the bedroom.  The interior design is minimalist, with carefully-chosen furnishings that open up the space. The round living area has an abundance of windows and a curved seating and dining area with a gas chimney serving as the centerpiece. The living space is flooded with natural light thanks to the home’s many windows and glass doors. Upstairs, the bedroom is a quiet space with a private pod-like deck – a prime spot for enjoying beautiful sea views. Adjacent is a spa-inspired bathroom with a 54-inch round soaking tub that overlooks the garden. + Sculpture Home Photography by Brent Black

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This groovy ‘Sculpture Home’ in California can be yours for just $1.4 million

An award-winning winery in British Columbia elegantly steps down a hillside

August 2, 2018 by  
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After having completed the Mission Hill Winery in the heart of British Columbia, Seattle-based architecture practice Olson Kundig Architects was tapped yet again for the design of Mission Hill’s sister winery, Martin’s Lane. Set into a steep hillside in the picturesque Canadian city of Kelowna, the newest von Mandl Family Estates winery features a design that follows the existing topography to facilitate a gravity-flow winemaking process. In addition to production facilities, the winery—which has won awards for both its wines and architecture—includes a visitor’s center and tasting room with sweeping views of the surrounding vineyards and terrain. Completed in the summer of 2016, the Martin’s Lake Winery is largely built from a striking combination of glass, obsidian-painted structural steel, weathered corrugated steel and concrete. The massive rectangular volume—spanning 34,800 square feet—is defined by a “central daylighting ‘fracture’” that splits the building down the middle, separating the production side from the visitor area. That “fracture” is fitted with clerestory windows to pull natural light deep into the interior. The production side of the winery  stair-steps down the landscape, making use of the natural slope for the gravity-flow winemaking process. The grape-receiving area is located at the top, followed by the fermentation and settling room, then the bottling room on the aboveground level and, finally, the underground barrel storage area. The cantilevered visitor’s area includes an office, wine lab, tasting room, dining room and a variety of publicly accessible areas that offer glimpses into the production process. Large windows frame views of nearby Okanagan Lake, the iconic winery bell tower, and the vineyards. Related: Elegant LEED Gold winery mimics Napa Valley’s curves “The idea of the building is to embrace both the landscape and the nature of gravity-fed wineries,” explains principal architect Tom Kundig. “Because it’s on a hillside, it was an ideal location amongst the vineyards of the area. The building falls along the topography of the land where production happens, while the hospitality portion of the program cantilevers out over the landscape, opening the space to the lake, the vineyards, and the mountains beyond.” + Olson Kundig Images by Nic Lehoux and James O’Mara

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An award-winning winery in British Columbia elegantly steps down a hillside

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