LEED Platinum housing for the homeless takes over a formerly vacant L.A. lot

July 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on LEED Platinum housing for the homeless takes over a formerly vacant L.A. lot

Los Angeles-based design practice Michael Maltzan Architecture  has transformed a vacant suburban lot into the Crest Apartments, a LEED Platinum -certified permanent supportive housing center that assists homeless individuals and veterans. Commissioned by the Skid Row Housing Trust, this striking light-filled property promotes healthy lifestyles with its inviting, community-focused design. In addition to serving the homeless, the 45,000-square-foot development also offers major benefits to the local community and environment with its stormwater management system that captures and treats over 90 percent of the site’s rainwater runoff. Located in Los Angeles’ Van Nuys neighborhood, the $23.6-million Crest Apartments building consists of 64 units, half of which are allocated for homeless veterans. Also included are supportive services and community space for residents such as the social services offices, a communal kitchen, laundry room, conference room, residents’ lounge and an outdoor community garden. The building was constructed with a prefabricated timber frame constructed by CTF California TrusFrame and clad with LaHambra Integral Color Plaster. To let in natural light and views of the city, the architects punctuated the white exterior with aluminum-framed Arcadia windows and glazed sliding doors. The Suniva Optimus Series Monocrystalline solar modules and Heliodyne solar thermal collectors help offset the building’s electricity needs. “The building’s arching form stretches the length of the site, creating a sheltered courtyard with four residential floors above,” says Michael Maltzan Architecture. “The low points of the building touch down at both the front and back of the site, creating a physical relationship to the smaller-scale single-family residences to the south, and the commercial facades to the north. The lobby and reception are positioned at the front to welcome residents and visitors and activate the street. Inviting, light-filled spaces throughout the building form a network of healthy community connections that support residents.” Related: Michael Maltzan’s Prefab Star Apartments in Downtown LA Residents at the Crest Apartments also enjoy access to a landscape of native , drought-resistant plantings that form a self-sustaining ecosystem supportive of a variety of uses. The low-irrigation landscape is also fitted out with two bioswales , infiltration trenches and permeable paving to manage almost all of the building’s stormwater runoff on-site. + Michael Maltzan Architecture Images via Iwan Baan

The rest is here: 
LEED Platinum housing for the homeless takes over a formerly vacant L.A. lot

3D-printed pod homes for the homeless could cling to NYC buildings

November 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 3D-printed pod homes for the homeless could cling to NYC buildings

Creative agency Framlab has proposed a type of parasitic architecture for housing New York City’s growing homeless population. Called Homed , the temporary housing solution comprises partly 3D-printed hexagonal pods that use scaffolding to attach to the sides of unused, windowless building facades. The modular units could be easily customized for different uses and transported from site to site. In an estimate by the Coalition for the Homeless , over 61,000 people are sleeping in New York City’s homeless shelters every night, a growing number that Framlab pins in part to the loss of single-room occupancy (SRO) units. In the face of rising real estate costs, Framlab’s Homed proposal to bring back SROs banks on the city’s abundance of “vertical land,” the blank sidewalls of buildings that appear as developments come and go. Using scaffolding to anchor the homes on the sidewalls, Homed’s hexagon-shaped housing modules could form temporary micro-neighborhoods and a type of private and attractive housing that most shelters are unable to provide. Following Homed’s tagline “Creating a Shelter with Dignity,” the tiny pods aim to create “a warm and friendly environment” in a year-round home. Each aluminum-framed pod features interior modules 3D printed from recyclable bioplastics and clad with wood laminate. PMMA smart glass lets in ample natural light, while the layer of thin film diodes provide privacy and can be used to depict artwork or commercial content on the outside. The flexibility of the modules allows a wide array of uses that include sleeping, showering, and socializing. Related: Parasitic pod homes attach to buildings to provide additional housing Framlab notes that Homed isn’t a “single solution to the situation. Rather, it is intended to be an instrument that plays a part in the solution. The massive extent and complexity of the situation requires work on a broad regulatory and policy-making level. But, it is critical that the design community is part of the process.” + Homed Via Dezeen

Here is the original post: 
3D-printed pod homes for the homeless could cling to NYC buildings

Foster + Partners Apple Park Visitor Center opens to the public

November 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Foster + Partners Apple Park Visitor Center opens to the public

Apple fans and architecture buffs can now sneak a peek at Apple’s massive spaceship campus at the new Apple Park Visitor Center, opened Friday. As with all the campus buildings and the new Apple stores, Foster + Partners led the design effort at the new Visitor Center, wrapped in a transparent envelope below an incredibly thin floating carbon-fiber roof. The combination of glass and carbon fiber is becoming a hallmark of Apple architecture and stores, including the campus’ Steve Jobs Theater that boasts the world’s largest carbon-fiber roof. Set within an olive grove and positioned for sweeping views of Apple Park, the 20,135-square-foot Visitor Center comprises an Apple Store, cafe, Apple Park exhibition area, and a roof terrace . A model of Apple Park that illustrates the massive scale of the 175-acre campus , as well as the undulating artificial landscape, first greets visitors. The full-height glazing and floating roof makes the building appear weightless and blurs the line between indoors and out. Related: Apple’s stunning “spaceship” campus revealed in new drone footage The furnishings and materials mimic those at Apple Park to give visitors a taste of the main building. The Visitor Center’s small cafe echoes the campus’ restaurant in the timber furnishings and marble countertops. The staircases are also clad in the same quartz stone used in the main building. “The idea was to create a delicate pavilion where visitors can enjoy the same material palette and meticulous detailing seen in the Ring Building in a relaxed setting, against the backdrop of Apple Park,” said Stefan Behling, Head of Studio, Foster + Partners. + Foster + Partners Images via Nigel Young / Foster + Partners

See the original post here: 
Foster + Partners Apple Park Visitor Center opens to the public

Life-saving LifeArk snaps together like LEGO to provide emergency off-grid housing

August 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Life-saving LifeArk snaps together like LEGO to provide emergency off-grid housing

Architect Charles Wee didn’t have grand plans to save the world—but that’s exactly what his incredible LifeArk could do. Designed for disaster relief, LifeArk is a prefabricated, modular building system for quickly deployable and affordable housing that can operate 100% off the grid . These self-sustainable life-saving homes, which can be scaled up into communities, can pop up virtually anywhere to float on water or be anchored on land. Thanks to its innovative HDPE materials and production methods, LifeArk clicks together like LEGOs in just a few hours and slashes the total design and construction time for prefabricated architecture in half. LifeArk was recently honored as a 2017 BFI Fuller Challenge Semifinalist . Charles Wee’s architectural career spans a start at AECOM to the founding of international firm GDS Architects . In recent years, however, he began thinking about changing his focus in architecture. “I was sick of conventional architecture,” Wee told Inhabitat in an interview. “Then I had a conversation with a family member that became a light bulb moment. Twelve years ago, my cousin moved to Santa Rosa Island in a part of the Amazon River near the borders of Brazil and Peru to work as a missionary. It’s an area of extreme poverty. I didn’t know much about his work until 2013, when my cousin came out to California and we talked about the way the community lives.” “Their entire existence revolves around fighting flooding. It can flood up to 8 meters high—that’s like 3 stories tall. For 8 months out of the year they must live above water in stilt houses but most of the time the water will come way above that. I saw that in person and understood it as a design and engineering problem. I began to think of floating architecture and buoyant solutions—trying to solve this problem is really what started LifeArk.” His meeting and visit with the people of Santa Rosa opened the doors for Wee to see the worldwide need for floating prefabricated housing. “I couldn’t believe the number,” he said. “There are hundreds of millions of people along floodplains around the world who live under threat.” Wee then assembled a team of experts and engineers to create a sustainable modular solution that could be mass-produced, easily deployable, and assembled. Their solution became LifeArk. The LifeArk components are prefabricated using rotational molding technology; their California factory is expected to stamp out 10 modules a day with around 20 components each. The 60-square-meter modules would then be sent to a second factory to be fitted with the fixed features, such as a kitchenette and off-grid elements like solar panels, before the components are packed into a shipping container for transit. Once onsite, each module can be quickly assembled using unskilled labor and standard tools in as little as 2 hours. Approximately 20 to 24 modules would be needed to construct a house, and the modular buildings can be scaled up and infinitely configured to form a community. Related: Peru plans to dam Amazon River’s main source and displace thousands “They’re like LEGOs,” explained Wee. “You just ‘click, click, click’ and you can bolt the parts together. They all fit together in a shipping container and can be transported to site. While manufacturing is being done we would prep the site, and then it’ll be say to bolt the module on top. All the machinery will be inside already so the only skilled labor needed on site is connections to sewers. But there’s also the option for 100% off-grid capability.” After four years of research and development, the LifeArk team is about ready to deploy their first prototype in March 2018. Three or four buildings will be prefabricated in California and installed on a lake near Dallas, Texas, along with an attached hydroponics farm. Wee also plans to sell LifeArk buildings to cities and organizations looking for affordable homeless housing . Profits will fund the construction and deployment of LifeArk buildings across the world for refugee housing, disaster relief, and other humanitarian purposes. LifeArk was selected as one of 17 proposals to advance in the semifinals for the 2017 Buckminster Fuller Challenge , an annual honor known as “socially responsible design’s highest award.” + LifeArk

See the rest here:
Life-saving LifeArk snaps together like LEGO to provide emergency off-grid housing

Tiny House Nation’s Zack Giffin will teach veterans to build their own homes

July 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Tiny House Nation’s Zack Giffin will teach veterans to build their own homes

There are nearly 50,000 homeless veterans every night, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Nonprofit Operation Tiny Home (OTH) decided to help veterans find a solution through tiny homes . Now they’re teaming up with Tiny House Nation ‘s Zack Giffin to offer a three-day workshop in Wisconsin to build homes for the James A. Peterson Veterans Village . The Wisconsin workshop will teach veterans how to construct their own tiny homes, in addition to giving them valuable job skills. The workshop is aimed at all skill levels. Not only will attendees be taught carpentry skills necessary to build their own homes for the James A. Peterson Veterans Village, they’ll learn about design concepts and how to read blueprints. Milwaukee Tools, USA will supply the tools for the workshop . Through the veterans village, Veterans Outreach of Wisconsin aims to give veterans the chance to have stable housing and become ” productive members of society ” again. Related: How Tiny House Villages Could Solve America’s Homeless Epidemic Zack Giffin said in a press release, “Veterans need quality, yet affordable homes, that provide dignity with their living situation, security, and an opportunity to be supported by their country…It’s about recognizing that financial stress and housing insecurity play a huge part in the mental well-being of many of our nation’s veterans.” OTH said tiny homes can offer “a high level of independence and dignity” for veterans who have struggled with finding housing in the past. This will will take place July 22-24, but Giffin and OTH hope to “jumpstart” more workshop programs around the United States. Other collaborative workshops are in the works for Washington, Tennessee, California, Texas, and Indiana. OTH Executive Director Gabrielle Rapport said, “These workshops are powerful and provide veterans with a sense of purpose and connection to their community.” + Operation Tiny Home + Veterans Outreach of Wisconsin Images via Zack Giffin Facebook and Operation Tiny Home Facebook

More:
Tiny House Nation’s Zack Giffin will teach veterans to build their own homes

A-Kamp47 Vertical Urban Campground Provides Subversive Shelter for the Homeless in France

December 10, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A-Kamp47 Vertical Urban Campground Provides Subversive Shelter for the Homeless in France

Read the rest of A-Kamp47 Vertical Urban Campground Provides Subversive Shelter for the Homeless in France Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: a-kamp47 , design for the homeless , eco design , green design , homeless , homeless housing , homeless shelter , humanitarian design , marseille , Marseilles , shelter , stealth camp , stephane malka , sustainable design , TENT , vertical campground , vertical camping        

View post:
A-Kamp47 Vertical Urban Campground Provides Subversive Shelter for the Homeless in France

Bad Behavior has blocked 1133 access attempts in the last 7 days.