An airy multigenerational home shows adaptive reuse done right

April 12, 2021 by  
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Vienna-based architecture firm OEOOO has transformed and expanded a disused farmhouse into the Hehl Tenne House, a warm and inviting multigenerational home wrapped in timber inside and out. Located in the rural outskirts of the Lower Bregenzerwald (Bregenz Forest) village of Lingenau, the original agricultural building had sat empty after the family farm shut down decades ago. The adaptive reuse project presented the perfect opportunity to not only revive the underutilized site for the next generation but also celebrate the region’s agricultural history. Designed as a home for living and working, the Hehl Tenne House has repurposed the ground floor of the former barn into a joint workshop that shares space with the building service equipment. Work areas are also integrated into the other parts of the home, from the first-floor living/dining area to the sleeping zones on the top floor. The common areas, located where hay was once stored, feature tall ceilings and seamlessly connect to the outdoors via a covered terrace to the southwest. Related: An old farmhouse becomes a hotel focused on indoor-outdoor living “The aim was to take up the unused spatial qualities of the former economic tract of a typical Bregenzerwald farmhouse and to identify the building in the sense of a multi-generational house,” the architects explained in a project statement. “In the generous cubature of the former threshing floor of the house, a compact, comfortable living space was created by means of replacement construction, which is closely related to the exterior space and the local building tradition.” The “replacement construction” was built with a single-shell exposed concrete base and timber-frame construction insulated with wood wool . The environmental footprint of the home is reduced with the use of a wood log heating system that heats the entire home and is supplied with timber felled on the property. The roof is equipped with a solar hot water system. + OEOOO Photography by Lukas Gaechter Photography via OEOOO

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An airy multigenerational home shows adaptive reuse done right

Wright-inspired home has trees growing through the roof

April 12, 2021 by  
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Moscow-based firm Kerimov Architects has crafted a custom, luxury home for a new villa community in Repino, Leningrad that follows Frank Lloyd Wright’s philosophy of organic architecture by knitting the built environment into the natural landscape. Dubbed the House in Repino, the project, which is still in the design phase, will include nearly 11,000 square feet of living space and focus on minimizing the removal of existing trees. Created to complement a forested landscape, the house will feature a natural materials palette and allow some of the trees to grow through the roof. The conceptual project is proposed for a community in Repino, an area northwest of St. Petersburg on the edge of the Gulf of Finland with a forested environment. To keep the natural landscape intact as much as possible, the villa community has required that all residences be designed in the style of Frank Lloyd Wright, a stipulation that Kerimov Architects has let guide its design process.  Related: Former railway yard to receive a green transformation in St. Petersburg “The house is well integrated into the landscape, practically dissolving into it,” the firm explained. “We’ll try to preserve as many existing trees as possible; some of them will go through the canopies to create a unique rhythm and build a strong relationship between architecture and nature.” The expansive home will be built with a natural materials palette of stone, wood and metal that complements the local environment. The materials will also be encouraged to develop a patina to help blend the home into the landscape over time. To strengthen the connection with nature, the architects have emphasized indoor/outdoor living throughout with the creation of individual terraces for every room, from the primary bedroom and two children’s bedrooms to the spa with a swimming pool, hammam (a Turkish bath) and sauna. The house is organized around a central living space that serves as the “main square” from where all circulation passes through. The site will also include a guest block comprising two guest bedrooms along with a garage housing staff rooms and a workshop. + Kerimov Architects Images via Kerimov Architects

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Wright-inspired home has trees growing through the roof

Brooklyn Home Company designs passive townhouse with raw wood elements

April 7, 2021 by  
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New York-based collective The Brooklyn Home Company has designed a passive townhouse in the Carroll Gardens neighborhood of Brooklyn in New York City. The townhouse, which was designed using Passive House principles, features four floors, a rooftop patio and a basement. The designers incorporated natural wood and soft tones into multiple aspects of the home to go along with the eco-friendly theme. There are beautiful hardwood floors and raw wooden furniture throughout, but the real heart of the home is realized in a gorgeous wooden staircase with raw wood banisters. The rooftop provides a functional sitting area surrounded by greenery and wooden walls. Related: New apartments bring sustainable architecture to the Upper West Side The passive design boosts energy-efficiency and soundproofing while an ERV filtering system provides the home with better indoor air quality, according to the company. The system is constantly extracting air toxins and stale air and releasing fresh, filtered air, all while regulating humidity levels. This consistent air circulating and humidity moderating not only improves air quality but also reduces the chance for airborne viruses to spread as it prevents mold growth and dryness in the air. Mold and air dryness are some of the most common causes for the spread of viruses in the wintertime and also factor into issues like allergies and dry skin. Passive House principals require airtight insulation, which keeps the home’s carbon footprint low and reduces heating and cooling bills. The Brooklyn Home Company also used triple-pane European windows to keep outside noise from getting into the townhouse. The company’s architectural manager is a Certified Passive House Designer, and The Brooklyn Home Company also teams up with New York City Passive House consultant and educator Bldtyp to oversee home builds. The company hopes that the cognitive and health benefits that better air quality bring into a house will inspire more homeowners to invest in the science and craftsmanship behind Passive House design . + The Brooklyn Home Company Photography by Matthew Williams via DADA Goldberg

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Brooklyn Home Company designs passive townhouse with raw wood elements

Green-roofed Czech cabin is built with recyclable hempcrete

April 5, 2021 by  
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After living as a modern nomad for years, Ond?ej Koní?ek finally decided to settle down by realizing his dream cabin on a 20,000-square-meter wooded property in southeast Czech Republic. Fueled by his love for the nature, Koní?ek tapped Czech architecture firm Ateliér Lina Bellovi?ová to design House LO, an eco-friendly, green-roofed home that not only embraces landscape views but is also built with hempcrete — a bio-composite building material seldom used in the country. When architect Lina Koní?ek Bellovi?ová was asked by Koní?ek to build with hempcrete — a composite of hemp hurds and lime with insulating properties typically used to construct non-weight-bearing infill walls — she knew it would be a challenge. The architect had never seen it used as a building material in the Czech Republic. “First struggles evolved in a valuable experience and fascination with its features and its history,” said Bellovi?ova, who used hempcrete for House LO’s walls. “Building with hempcrete is easy and allows the builder to build their house on their own.”  Related: “Cannabis walls” add warmth to this eco-friendly home in Israel In addition to ease of construction, hempcrete also has carbon-sequestering and insulation benefits; it can be recycled and is resistant to pests, fire and mold. The architect topped the home with a green roof for additional insulation. Completed over the course of a year, the timber-framed cabin features a simple, modern design to blend in with the landscape. The single-story dwelling includes a concrete basement that houses technical equipment, storage, a lounge and a special chamber where the client develops his photographs. The ground floor above is a light-filled space centered on an open-plan living area, dining room and kitchen flanked by two bedrooms and a bathroom. A large terrace that is sheltered by deep roof overhangs wraps around the entire cabin and can be accessed by sliding glass doors that bookend the main living space. + Ateliér Lina Bellovi?ová Images by BoysPlayNice

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Green-roofed Czech cabin is built with recyclable hempcrete

An Upstate New York studio heated and cooled without fossil fuels

April 5, 2021 by  
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With retirement and grandchildren on the horizon, a Manhattanite couple reached out to  GRT Architects  to design their new home in Upstate New York’s Dutchess County. Since the clients were on the fence about leaving New York City, the architects started by building a small studio that sensitively frames views of the 24-acre site’s pastoral landscape. Simply dubbed the Dutchess County Studio, the 800-square-foot dwelling provides an elegant getaway in nature and reduces its carbon footprint with a fossil-fuel-free heating and cooling system that relies on  radiant energy .  Located by a lake with zero neighbors in sight, the Dutchess County Studio was developed as part of GRT Architects’ site-sensitive master plan that includes schematic signs for a three-bedroom house, a workshop, a swimming pool, fire pit and dock along with a new shared driveway, septic system, well and electrical service. Knowing that the clients once lived in a  Frank Lloyd Wright -planned Usonia community, the architects also drew from Wright’s nature-centric design philosophy to place each building “where it would have a view but not be the view.” To recede the studio into the landscape, the architects clad the building in textured black brick and, to lend a sense of warmth to the exterior, topped the roof with natural cedar shakes with copper trim. The 800-square-foot  open plan  studio comprises three equally sized volumes arranged in a pinwheel formation and placed to follow the topography. Built-in volumes help maximize interior space while subtly delineating the three different rooms — cooking, living and sleeping — each of which is oriented to different landscape views. The living room includes a  Murphy bed  to accommodate guests.  Related: Cold Spring Residence, a family’s low-impact weekend retreat Happy with the successful design and build of the studio, the clients have given the architects the green light to move on with other elements of the master plan, with planning for the home underway. + GRT Architects Images by Ithai Schori

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An Upstate New York studio heated and cooled without fossil fuels

How to have a plastic-free Easter

March 26, 2021 by  
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Easter is a time of celebration, exuberant children and family bonding. While traditions vary around the world, attending church is common practice, as are egg hunts, Easter baskets and family dinners. All that hustle and prep can equate to copious plastic waste . Avoid contributing additional plastic to the landfill with a plan focused on alternatives instead. Choose durable, long-lasting baskets Whether the Easter baskets in your home are used for a reward at the end of a scavenger hunt or are simply set out as an Easter morning surprise, it’s easy to source an alternative to the plastic options. Instead, use a wood, paper or rattan basket. With some creativity, you can skip the basket altogether. Whatever you decide to use, make sure it’s a multipurpose solution that can be used in the months and years that follow. Consider a canvas tote, decorative cardboard box, hat storage box, a wire fruit basket or small metal toolbox. You could also use a plastic-free waste basket, fabric produce bag or a stainless steel lunch container.  Related: How to make Easter eggs using natural dyes Use shredded paper in the basket When filling your baskets, avoid the shredded plastic bedding, often known as Easter grass. If you already have it in your home, be sure to package it up and reuse it year after year rather than tossing it. Get the same effect with colorful paper using your paper shredder. You can also skip the shredder altogether; use crumpled tissue paper or add a colorful cloth napkin as a liner instead. Naturally dye real eggs At some point, plastic eggs began to replace hard-boiled eggs in the traditional egg hunt. Bring back the real thing and enjoy a family project of decorating them using natural dyes . If your kids have gotten used to reaping a prize with each egg, create a system where they can trade in their real eggs for prizes instead of those found inside plastic eggs.  If plastic eggs are already in your home, use them for years to come and donate them when you no longer need them. Similarly, if you’re asked to source plastic eggs for an event, buy them secondhand or borrow some for the occasion. When buying new, look for wood eggs or eggs that are at least made from recycled plastic. Remember to flex your conscientious-purchasing muscles while figuring out what to put into the eggs, too. Coins, paper-wrapped candies, wood blocks, lip balm or clues to larger prizes all fit the bill. Fill the basket with eco-friendly toys, games and candy While giving and receiving is fun, filling a basket full of plastic in the process isn’t. Scrutinize product packaging while you shop. Avoid any options wrapped in plastic film or packed in plastic foam. Instead, hunt down puzzles and games in cardboard boxes, books made from paper and candy in eco-friendly containers. Even better, go DIY and get creative. Dig out the cookie cutters and fun cardstock. Make homemade goodies and package them in paper bags, reusable beeswax wrap or fabric. Create fun cookie shapes, bunny-themed rice crispy treats or sugar cookies decorated like eggs. You can also make some easy modeling dough in a variety of colors or bubble mix made from a few pantry items. Outside of the kitchen, basket contents can include DIY wood toys like cars or a rubber band shooter. Use a printer to create a stapled-together book of coloring sheets or workbook activities. Bundle them with some colored pencils for hours of entertainment. For the seamstress, make dolls, a sock puppet or stuffed animal. Another option is to use fabric scraps to put together bean bags stuffed with rice or beans for a mini bean bag toss game. Paper crafts are also fun. You can either pre-form some origami to watch the wonder in their eyes, or gather together the supplies for the kids to make their own. Even better, go old-school with a “choose your answer” fortune-teller game from folded paper. Write out instructions and rewards and then fold it up to create the game.  Even if you buy all the treats inside your Easter baskets, pay attention to packaging and production materials to keep the plastic at bay. Focus on goods made from wood and other natural materials. Hunt down toys and candy encased in basic cardboard boxes or paper bags. Use the opportunity to share your love of nature with sports equipment, plant seeds, bulbs, a science journal, a leaf-pressed bookmark, gardening tools and gloves for little hands, and marbles or cards for indoor or outdoor play. Make a plastic-free meal plan Make sure your holiday meal doesn’t come with added waste. While shopping, watch for plastic-wrapped produce and other plastic packaging. Buy in bulk and bring your own containers when you can. Also remember your reusable shopping and produce bags. Order meat from a local butcher or farm. Alternatively, buy from the meat counter at the department store where foods are typically wrapped in paper rather than plastic. Even better, create a plant-based meal plan instead. For meal service, get out the real dishes instead of relying on single-use options. Avoid plastic foam plates and cups. If you do choose to go with disposable, choose compostable options. Images via JE Shoots , Silvia Rita , Michel Balog and Lloyd Dirks

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How to have a plastic-free Easter

19th-century Catalan ruins are revived into a self-sufficient home

March 24, 2021 by  
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Spanish architecture firm Andrea Solé Arquitectura has given new life to the ruins of Can Tomeu, a historic Catalan building from the 1800s that is now a modern, self-sufficient home. In addition to sensitively restoring and reinforcing the remaining walls from the original construction, the architects expanded the building footprint with an annex and inserted site-sensitive materials that imbue the home with a sense of warmth. The house has also been outfitted with solar panels, diesel tanks and rainwater harvesting and graywater systems for off-grid use. Located at the entrance of the Parc Natural de Garraf just outside of the town of St Pere de Ribes, Can Tomeu was originally used for agricultural and stone-crafting purposes for the Masia Corral d’en Capdet. Although the building was later abandoned and deteriorated into ruins comprising only bearing walls, Can Tomeu was classified as a Cultural Asset of Local Interest (BCIL), a designation that requires the preservation of the building’s remaining elements. Despite the strict regulations and the poor conditions of the ruins, the architects took on the challenge by carefully rehabilitating the original walls and expanding the footprint by 30%. Related: Old ruins are transformed into a cozy, off-grid guesthouse in France The architects used iron mesh and concrete reinforcement to repair and join the original stone walls. Concrete was also used to raise the height of the existing walls and form a new roof structure. In contrast, the exterior walls of the new annex are rendered as smooth, white surfaces. Large, timber-framed windows punctuate both the old and new construction to visually tie the buildings together, bring a sense of warmth into the home and frame exterior landscape views. The light-filled interiors match the minimalist design approach of the exteriors with a simple materials palette that includes ceramic tiling to evoke a Mediterranean character. “The performance represents a second life for the building, rediscovering the existing interior spaces of clear and powerful geometry that after the intervention constitute a new spatial experience,” the architects noted. + Andrea Solé Arquitectura Photography by Adria Goula via Andrea Solé Arquitectura

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19th-century Catalan ruins are revived into a self-sufficient home

EconOdome offers versatile, DIY dome home kits

March 24, 2021 by  
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Illinois-based designer and builder Wil Fidroeff has been helping people build their own dome homes for the past 30 years. His company, Faze Change Produx, creates six models of 10-sided DIY dome home building kits utilizing wood and thermoplastic polyolefin, a type of single-ply roofing material that is low-cost and highly durable. The EconOdome frame and triangle panel kits come pre-cut and partially assembled with detailed instructions; the company even offers personal consultation if necessary. According to Fidroeff, EconOdome homes are built similarly to conventional homes, starting with the foundation and main floor. Next, the vertical walls are constructed, followed by the roof frame. Once the walls are up, 130 triangular roofing elements connect to form the domed top. The dome’s 10 equally sized sides make it easier to keep everything organized. Related: Permaculture design expert Matthew Prosser builds a family dome home “Our two most popular frame kit types are the ‘T-Beam’ frame kit, which features an exposed wood interior, and, the more economical ‘Basic’ frame kit. The third type of frame kit is called the ‘Double Dome,’” Fidroeff told Inhabiat. “A Double Dome frame kit can consist of two 2×4 Basic EconOdome frame kits (one dome inside a larger dome). Or, a Double Dome can consist of a 2×4 exterior Basic EconOdome frame kit plus an interior T-Beam EconOdome frame kit. EconOdome frame kits are most often used to build a two-story home above a 10-sided perimeter riser wall.” Parts in the frame kit are precisely cut to fit exactly and minimize construction waste . The wood includes pre-drilled holes for stainless steel screws and caps. A 26-foot fully insulated model runs about $18,000, although the company also offers cheaper options with its smaller models. The 26-foot model spans just over 800 square feet, featuring two stories with a fully equipped kitchen on the first floor as well as a bedroom on the top. The top floor has room for a half-bath and space for an office or storage. Available colors range from white, tan and light gray, while the interiors are finished with exposed wood. A smaller option, the 13-foot Little Dome , keeps the signature, 10-sided design but cuts down the number of rooftop triangles to 40. People who live in tropical climates can opt for hurricane panels made with three layers of 3/4-inch plywood and an apex vent to ventilate heat and moisture. + EconOdome Via Tiny House Talk Images via Wil Fidroeff

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EconOdome offers versatile, DIY dome home kits

HelloFresh would like to clear the air on meal kits

March 22, 2021 by  
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HelloFresh would like to clear the air on meal kits Jeff Yorzyk Mon, 03/22/2021 – 02:00 Since the world was introduced to the first meal kit over a decade ago, the industry has matured in size and familiarity, but it also has endured notable criticism surrounding packaging and its perceived impact on the environment. Leading sustainability for a meal kit company, I am acutely aware of our weak points and an advocate for the benefits. Let me be the first say that as an industry, there is ongoing work to do to make meal kits the most sustainable food option. I have seen significant progress to this end — both in my company and the industry at large — from iterating on packaging needs to rethinking how to sustainably control temperature during transport. As head of sustainability at HelloFresh US, it is my charge to advance this standard. I also have observed firsthand how technology-driven innovation is disrupting the traditional grocery supply chain, opening new doors to reducing food waste and helping the world to think differently about how we source food. To channel that disruption for good — and to positively affect the environment — the meal kit industry must hold itself accountable to do better. To keep disrupting in pursuit of a more sustainable supply chain, we must continue making improvements to be part of the solution for a sustainable food industry. Here are the greatest areas for growth — and opportunity — I see for the meal kit sector: Packaging innovation must continue to challenge the status quo If there is one consistent critique against this industry, it is that meal kits developed a reputation for excess packaging. Providing consumers with the exact amount of ingredients for a recipe contributes to less food waste in the home — but tough critics point to pre-portioned ingredient packaging as wasteful. In truth, as with any e-commerce company, packaging in the early days of the meal kit industry was more deserving of this criticism and far less thoughtful than it is today. New industries often have unintended consequences while they seek to disrupt entrenched challenges of others. As an industry gains momentum and critical mass, it needs to address things that can become problematic at scale. For meal kits, packaging waste was one of those unintended consequences. Research continues to examine the whole life cycle of meal kits to understand the environmental impacts as it relates to packaging and food waste. Meal kits live where technology meets the traditional food system. HelloFresh benchmarks in comparison to supermarkets, where consumers typically get their groceries. Consider the grocery shopper and meal-kit customer who cook the same recipe. Retail shoppers do not see the packaging waste at each step of the supply chain before food arrives on shelves — many steps meal kits skip altogether as a streamlined direct-to-consumer model. Still, we must hold our industry to a high standard for sustainable packaging. Since the industry’s inception, meal kits have made strides towards reducing the overall amount of packaging, tracking what is used to the item level and exploring more sustainable and recyclable packaging. HelloFresh also has engaged to fight key problems related to packaging in the environment. Through a partnership with Plastic Bank , the company’s Green Chef brand collects and recycles ocean-bound plastic commensurate with every ounce of plastic in a customer’s box. At HelloFresh, we established a three-pronged packaging commitment: avoid, reduce and innovate. In the U.S., our teams have continued to minimize overall packaging and plastic. They also have introduced insulating liners that are curbside recyclable and provided consumer education on our website with step-by-step instructions. The responsibility lies with individual companies across the entire food system to invest dollars and resources against research and development to innovate on sustainable packaging methods. Creating a new supply chain is key to reducing food waste Meal kits live where technology meets the traditional food system. The logistical challenges this industry has solved for — particularly with respect to food waste and availability — are very different from how supermarkets stock and sell food. Technology has disrupted so many legacy industries. Why not the grocery model? The ReFED Insights Engine , a data and solutions hub for food loss and waste, reports 35 percent of all food goes unsold or uneaten, with at least 24 percent of the food supply ending up as waste. Reducing that by just 50 percent could create $73 billion in annual net financial benefit for the country, reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 75 million metric tons and rescue food equivalent to 4 billion meals for people in need each year. Changing the way people eat takes more than improving how meals are prepared, just as reducing home food waste goes beyond pre-portioning ingredients to avoid unintended spoilage. It means creating a new supply chain and ensuring the sustainability of that model. Meal kits predict order volume with high accuracy, leveraging advanced analytics, machine learning and predictive tools. This consumer demand-driven pull model brings a new level of sophistication and efficiency to the supply chain, resulting in dramatic food waste reductions. Contrast that with the push model popularized in retail — stocking a variety of items to “push” to customers in standard volumes. This strategy frequently results in excess food waste both for retailers and in our homes. Can we not make the outcome of enjoying a delicious meal a more sustainable process? The direct-to-consumer business model is a sustainable evolution of the food system, targeting the functional output of a delicious, nutritious meal with laser-like precision. Employing a tech-based, high-efficiency approach to procurement is how HelloFresh limits food waste in its facilities to less than 1 percent of purchased ingredients. While it sounds like a simple enough job, the reality is that it’s much more difficult to do this at scale than anyone anticipated. Meal kits must continue to disrupt the established way of doing business. Sustainability in the modern food economy The direct-to-consumer business model is a sustainable evolution of the food system, targeting the functional output of a delicious, nutritious meal with laser-like precision. The pandemic has only accelerated the adoption of e-commerce food shopping. Homebound consumers put a premium on fresh food delivered to their doorstep —  92 percent of consumers plan to continue online grocery shopping . Yet the issue of food waste in the home remains, especially given that minimum volumes sold by retailers are often more than consumers need. Meal kits are recognized among the top two solutions for minimizing food waste in ReFED’s Roadmap to 2030: Reducing U.S. Food Waste by 50 percent . Other players in the post-pandemic food environment can learn from how our industry leverages supply chain technology, predictive analytics and machine learning. Regardless of the channel, technology will be key to optimizing supply chains, managing inventory and building a more sustainable food system. The bottom line For its part, the meal kit industry still has work to do to make this business model the most sustainable it can be. Systems that monitor, measure and reduce transport packaging from suppliers — and to end customers — should be table stakes. HelloFresh must refine its technology to fight food waste in customers’ kitchens and in its own fulfillment centers. And as any good corporate citizen, the company must continue to reduce its carbon footprint from operations beyond the (notable) food waste benefits. All this work is happening every day. For progress and shortcomings alike, HelloFresh must set a standard for sustainability that suits the food system we all want to create — not the one we must leave behind. Pull Quote Meal kits live where technology meets the traditional food system. The direct-to-consumer business model is a sustainable evolution of the food system, targeting the functional output of a delicious, nutritious meal with laser-like precision. Topics Food Systems Circular Economy Packaging Food Waste Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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HelloFresh would like to clear the air on meal kits

Casa Etrea offers off-grid lodging on an extinct volcano

March 12, 2021 by  
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Nestled into the slope of the dormant Palo Huérfano volcano in central Mexico, Casa Etérea is a passion project of Singapore writer, photographer and designer Prashant Ashoka. The mirrored dwelling is not only self-sustaining but environmentally friendly, too. Casa Etérea is located just 20 minutes from San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, an UNESCO World Heritage Site. Visitors arrive via four-wheel-drive transport from town, provided as part of the lodging package. Upon arrival, Casa Etérea makes a memorable statement with its mirrored exterior. Not only does the glass reflect the surrounding hillsides and mesquite trees for the human eye, but a special patterned, ultraviolet coating allows birds to see it as a structure, thus eliminating impact risks. The name Etérea translates from Spanish to ethereal, deepening the emphasis on art, beauty and connection to the natural environment. Related: Filmmaker designs and builds off-grid backcountry cabin for $50k Ashoka explained, “The vision was to create a theatre to nature , so sustainability was crucial in achieving a truly complete integration with the environment.” The structure is completely off of the grid and houses two people comfortably within the 75-square-meter space. Solar panels provide 100% power to the home, which includes plenty of amenities for comfort: a king-sized bed, a luxe living space, a kitchen and laundry facilities. Rainwater is collected and reused for daily activities, including to fill the distinctive copper bathtub located beside the bed. Natural materials such as jute, leather, wood and stone further express the connection with nature. Ashoka wanted to ensure minimal site impact , so the entire foundation was formed from rocks collected on the surrounding mountain. Careful positioning of the structure allows for effective ventilation, and insulating glass regulates temperature control. This level of energy efficiency doesn’t sacrifice the views offered by the floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors. Once the home is opened to the outdoors, guests can step directly onto a patio and pool area naturally shaded by olive and pomegranate trees. Meaningful community engagement was also important to Ashoka, who has connected with local providers for activities such as horseback riding, guided hikes and ATV tours. Casa Etérea is available to experience for up to two guests and can be booked directly through Instagram [@casa_eterea]. + Casa Etérea Images via Prashant Ashoka

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Casa Etrea offers off-grid lodging on an extinct volcano

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