So, You’ve Audited Your Waste, Now What?

September 19, 2018 by  
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In part one, Conducting A Home Waste Audit, you learned … The post So, You’ve Audited Your Waste, Now What? appeared first on Earth911.com.

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So, You’ve Audited Your Waste, Now What?

Earthling Survey: Would You Pay a Recycling Specialist for Help?

September 19, 2018 by  
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Earthling Survey: Would You Pay a Recycling Specialist for Help?

Passive House-inspired home ushers in spectacular Grand Tetons views

September 17, 2018 by  
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The sublime beauty of the Grand Tetons is fully embraced in the stunning House of Fir, a forever home that boasts sustainable and durable elements throughout. Designed by Wyoming-based architecture firm kt814 for a pair of retirees who actively volunteer for the National Park Service, this Jackson Hole abode was crafted to prioritize low-maintenance comfort with passive house design principles and universal design for aging in place. In fact, the home’s energy-efficient construction was put to the test this past winter, when the homeowners lost power — the home was able to stay comfortably snug for four consecutive days despite below-zero temperatures outside. The House of Fir comprises three connected pavilion-like units clad in Douglas fir and cedar that span a total area of 2,500 square feet, plus a 685-square-foot garage. Sloped rooflines help the structures shed snow in winter. Architects Rich Assenberg and Nathan Gray of kt814 carefully positioned the home to follow passive solar principles and to maximize privacy as well as unobstructed views of the spectacular Teton Range. The key to success was the installation of FSC-certified Thermo Clad Pine, triple-glazed windows that usher in landscape views; the strategic placement of the full-height glazing also blocks views of the homes to the east and west. Related: Modern open-plan home in Jackson Hole reduces construction waste with six prefab units In addition to triple-glazed windows, the House of Fir incorporates an airtight double wall system with superior insulation and hydronic radiant-floor heating . Local designer Jacque Jenkins-Stireman dressed the clean and modern interiors in a natural material palette that matches the architecture to keep the focus on the outdoors. For instance, many of the furnishings, like the kitchen cabinet doors, dining table and master bedroom furniture were constructed from a mixture of walnut. Alex Everett, the homeowner’s son-in-law, also handcrafted custom pieces for the house, giving it a personal touch. + kt814 Images by David Agnello

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Passive House-inspired home ushers in spectacular Grand Tetons views

An off-grid cabin on a remote island is inspired by Japanese design

September 17, 2018 by  
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Tasmania-based firm Maguire + Devine Architects has created a gorgeous Japanese-inspired, off-grid tiny cabin tucked away into a remote island off the coast of Tasmania. The 301-square-foot home is designed to operate completely off the grid and comes complete with solar panels and a rainwater collection system. The tiny cabin is located on 99 acres of Bruny Island, a tranquil destination just off the Tasmanian coast. Using minimalist design features, the architects set about to create a soothing retreat that would evoke a sense of serenity and have a strong connection to the surrounding landscape. Related: This off-grid cabin in the pristine Alaskan wilderness can only be reached by sea or air The compact cabin is clad in bush fire-resistant wood siding at its base and enclosed on one side with zincalume metal siding, which is also used for the sloped roof. The shed-like roofline adds character to the design, but it’s also a strategic feature that allows more space for solar panels . Taking advantage of the location, the architects positioned the cabin to open up to the east and west so that the homeowners could enjoy early morning and afternoon sunshine. According to the architects, the design for the off-grid cabin was inspired by their client’s love of Japanese minimalist design. “Our brief was to capture that love and design a building as a piece of furniture with everything she needs built in,” the firm said. “The only furniture allowed was a low table and mattress on the sleeping loft.” Inside, the living space, which is clad in light-colored wooden panels, is bright and airy, illuminated with natural light from a large skylight. Two large sliding doors open up to two wooden decks facing east and west, creating a seamless connection between the inside and the outside. The low-lying platforms were built without railings, so nothing obstructs the views of the surrounding wilderness. To provide the ultimate retreat experience, one of the decks includes a recessed tub for the resident to relax while watching the sun go down. The two large sliding doors are made out of transparent glazing, another nod to Japanese design . “Translucent glass in the sliding doors references the light qualities of Japanese rice-paper screens, creating a sense of enclosure and privacy at night, while encouraging the occupant to open them during the day,” the architects explained. “They also prevent birds, including the endangered swift parrot, from attempting to fly through the building and striking the glass.” Located at the back of the home is a compact kitchen, equipped with a Nectre Bakers oven that is not only used for cooking but also supplies sustainable heating in the colder months. The bedroom is located in a sleeping loft accessible by ladder. An elevated seating area with a large window provides the most stunning views of the island. + Maguire + Devine Architects Via Dwell Photography by Rob Maver via Maguire + Devine Architects

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An off-grid cabin on a remote island is inspired by Japanese design

This sustainable dog house has a green roof and solar-powered fan to keep cool

September 7, 2018 by  
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Green design has touched every aspect of our world, and now even our little furry friends can play their part in living a sustainable lifestyle. Californian firm  Studio Schicketanz has designed a sustainable dog house made with eco-friendly materials that boasts some pretty incredible features. The timber canine cottage has a side green-carpeted ramp that leads up to the green roof , which is installed with a motion-activated water faucet and irrigation system. The architects created the dreamy dog house to be both functional and sustainable. The design was inspired by the firm’s focus on creating “landscape, architecture and interior design with a focused emphasis on livability.” Related: Y-town recycled old refrigerator into a dog house for adopted pup The main volume of the dog house is a traditional box shape with a slightly slanted roof. Inside, the sleeping space is equipped with a built-in floor drain for easy cleaning. Additionally, there is a solar-powered fan that keeps the canines cool during the day. Doggies can also keep an eye on any visitors thanks to tiny peekaboo windows on either side of the home. On the exterior, a hidden compartment stores toys, treats and additional accessories. A green-covered ramp leads up to the green roof, which was integrated into the design to encourage dogs to enjoy some fresh air from the comfort of their own personal space. Adding to the dog’s comfort is a motion-activated water spout on the roof to keep the precious pooches well-hydrated while they people watch from above. To reduce water waste , the drinking fountain is connected to an irrigation system. Related: How to build a green dog house The eco-friendly dog shelter will be on display at the Carmel Canine Cottages Competition from September 11 through September 15. After the event, the structure will be auctioned off, with all funds going to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA). + Studio Schicketanz Via Apartment Therapy Images via Studio Schicketanz

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This sustainable dog house has a green roof and solar-powered fan to keep cool

The Micropolis custom net-zero home generates all its own energy

September 6, 2018 by  
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When Cheryl and Ken Serdar saw one of the homes belonging to Micropolis®, a collection of sustainable and contemporary house plans designed by architect Arielle Condoret Schechter , they knew they wanted a custom home based on the original 950-square-foot “Happy Family” plan. Taking into account the couple’s needs for extra space, Schechter designed a 2,222-square-foot dwelling that also offered all of the sustainable and modern design features defined in her Micropolis® line. Located in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, the custom net-zero home is the most energy-efficient residence that the architect has designed to date. The clients were very clear with their expectations of their new three-bedroom house and asked for an abode that was “very modern, extremely green [and] almost industrial.” The modified Micropolis® meets all three targets with its predominate use of concrete for durability and sustainability measures as well as through passive solar principles. The home is oriented toward the south for maximum solar gain, while all the aluminum-framed windows and doors were sourced from Awilux and certified for Passive House construction. Ample glazing opens the home up to natural light, natural ventilation and a connection to the outdoors. To minimize unwanted solar gain, Schechter designed deep roof overhangs built with cypress soffit to visually soften the prefab concrete sandwich panels with built-in insulation. The home is also outfitted with space-saving solutions such as sliding interior barn doors, built-in closets, cabinets and shelving. An industrial feel is achieved with exposed ductwork, concrete elements, minimalist cabinetry and a large factory fan. A wall of glazed folding doors opens the home up to the outdoors to create a greater illusion of spaciousness. Related: The net-zero Lightbox 23 boasts sustainable features and stunning views The net-zero energy house is powered by a small 6 kW solar array . An energy recovery ventilator paired with seals on all air gaps makes for an airtight envelope. Under-slab insulation was installed beneath the polished concrete floors, and the home has achieved a HERS rating of -13. + Arielle Condoret Schechter Images via Kim Weiss / Arielle Condoret Schechter

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The Micropolis custom net-zero home generates all its own energy

Defining What’s “Recyclable” in the US

September 5, 2018 by  
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Ah, the question we’ve all asked at least once while … The post Defining What’s “Recyclable” in the US appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Defining What’s “Recyclable” in the US

Survey Results: Climate Change Opinions Causing Family Tension?

September 5, 2018 by  
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Survey Results: Climate Change Opinions Causing Family Tension?

Earthling Survey: Does Your Workplace Offer Commuting Options?

September 5, 2018 by  
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Earthling Survey: Does Your Workplace Offer Commuting Options?

A Seattle midcentury home is restored to its original brilliance with a modern twist

September 3, 2018 by  
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When a young family reached out to Seattle-based design studio SHED Architecture & Design and interior designer Jennie Gruss for a redesign of their 1957 midcentury home in the city, the designers responded with a restoration that also integrated new, modern details. Named the Hillside Midcentury, the home saw an interior remodel that leaned heavily on a mix of natural timber and brick to create a homey atmosphere. Contemporary furnishings, clean lines and an abundance of glazing help give the home a fresh and youthful spirit. Originally designed by Pacific Northwest architect Arnold Gangnes, the existing home had a fairly open layout with an airy feel that embraced the outdoors and featured two floors with mirrored floor plans, a common architectural design in the 1950s. “[We] did not make any major structural changes but instead updated the kitchen, bathrooms and bedrooms to better align with the family’s living patterns,” the team said. Outside, the firm also added a large deck, updated patio and green roof. Timber wraps the interior with the original hardwood preserved in the living room and dining room. To break up the wood motif in the kitchen, the architects inserted maroon laminate cabinets from Beech Tree Woodworks for a splash of color. The exposed ceiling beams and datum are painted black to give a strong sense of structure to the house. Related: Old horse stable transformed into a chic art studio and guesthouse In addition to the updated materials and furnishings, some of the most notable changes can be seen in the updated floor layouts. On the basement level, the spacious living room was split up into a guest bedroom, mudroom and media room. Upstairs, one of the original bedrooms was converted into a large master bath, while the existing bathrooms were modified into a walk-in closet. Perhaps most impressively, the architects turned an old tool shed into an indoor swimming pool topped with a green roof . + SHED Architecture & Design Images via Rafael Soldi, exterior via SHED

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A Seattle midcentury home is restored to its original brilliance with a modern twist

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