World’s Smallest Garden lets you recycle old bottles into adorable hydroponic gardens

June 7, 2017 by  
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You can always recycle an old wine bottle , but what if you could transform it into a tiny garden instead? Urban Leaf empowers people to grow food at home through the World’s Smallest Garden, and upcycle used bottles into planters. It takes minutes to put together one of the mini gardens, which can grow greens and herbs year-round – and you can snag one on the cheap right now on Kickstarter . The World’s Smallest Garden is comprised of a 3D-printed cylindrical device, or plug, that fits right into the neck of an old bottle. The plastic used in the product is biodegradable . Users fill the bottle with water, insert the device filled with soil and seeds, and sit back and let the plants grow. Plants can draw on that initial water source for a month, and then users can add water as needed. Related: Build your own indoor garden with modular LEGO-like blocks Dill, lettuce, bok choy, and basil are just a few of the plants that can be grown with the World’s Smallest Garden. Users will be able to start harvesting the plants after around four to six weeks. The team designed the garden with the idea that plants would grow just in the bottle, although co-founder Robert Elliott told Inhabitat it should work to move a plant into a planter since hydroponically grown plants typically transplant well. They’ve been able to grow herbs like mint and parsley for five months in bottles, and even grew dwarf tomatoes to fruit in a World’s Smallest Garden. Elliott and Nathan Littlewood started Urban Leaf to work towards a better food system. On their website they say they believe growing food in urban areas solves many of the issues with the modern food industry , allowing for less waste, less packaging, and shorter supply chains. But many people living in cities don’t have a lot of space to grow gardens, an obstacle Urban Leaf overcomes with the World’s Smallest Garden. Elliott told Inhabitat, “The design process for the World’s Smallest Garden was an effort to create the most minimal product that still effectively grew plants. We started with a ‘bells and whistles’ prototype and removed lights, pumps, multiple substrates, nutrient packets, and even the reservoir. Brown or green glass bottles are a natural fit for a reservoir (they block harmful red/blue light while allowing you to see in) and most people just throw them away! By selling just the essential component to turn existing waste into a hydroponic reservoir we save customers money and reduce our manufacturing and shipping environmental impact.” Urban Leaf is currently crowdfunding on Kickstarter . You can get a single pack that comes with three plugs and seeds for $15. Check out the Kickstarter here . + Urban Leaf Images courtesy of Urban Leaf

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World’s Smallest Garden lets you recycle old bottles into adorable hydroponic gardens

‘Instantly rechargeable’ battery spells bad news for gas-guzzling cars

June 7, 2017 by  
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Charging an electric car remains an obstacle for some people, especially in areas lacking charging infrastructure. But new battery technology developed by researchers at Purdue University could change that completely. They’ve designed an instantly rechargeable battery that could allow electric vehicles to be charged in roughly the same amount of time it takes to fill up a car with gasoline today. The researchers designed a flow battery system, which in itself isn’t unique, but the Purdue scientists removed battery membranes, something they say no one else has done. Membranes in batteries break down over time, so the new battery technology allows for a longer lifespan and cuts costs. This rechargeable battery could be a game changer for electric cars. Related: New battery concept could give electric vehicles a 621-mile range Drawing on the Purdue energy storage technology, electric car owners would pull up to a station and fill up their cars with not gas, but fluid electrolytes. The spent battery fluids could be gathered and recharged at a solar or wind farm . Earth, atmospheric, and planetary science professor John Cushman said in a statement, “Instead of refining petroleum, the refiners would reprocess spent electrolytes and instead of dispensing gas, the fueling stations would dispense a water and ethanol or methanol solution as fluid electrolytes to power vehicles…It is believed that our technology could be nearly ‘drop-in’ ready for most of the underground piping system, rail and truck delivery system, gas stations and refineries.” They say their instantly rechargeable method is affordable, safe, and environmentally friendly. Cushman recently presented their findings at the International Society for Porous Media 9th International Conference in the Netherlands. With two other Purdue researchers, he started a company, IFBattery, to commercialize their technology. Cushman said they are seeking financing to develop large-scale prototypes, and from there they’ll look for manufacturing partners. Via Purdue University Images via Purdue University and Håkan Dahlström on Flickr

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‘Instantly rechargeable’ battery spells bad news for gas-guzzling cars

Meet MEG, an Automated Greenhouse That is Crowd-Sourcing Gardening

November 12, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Meet MEG, an Automated Greenhouse That is Crowd-Sourcing Gardening Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: automated greenhouses , Gardening , green technology , home gardening , indoor gardening , indoor greenhouse , MEG – Micro Experimental Growing system

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Meet MEG, an Automated Greenhouse That is Crowd-Sourcing Gardening

Lino Modular Wooden Storage Units Clean Up Your Mess in Style

November 12, 2014 by  
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Are you looking for a solution to the clutter that tends to linger around your room? Then you may be interested in Lino, a modular storage unit line recently launched by sustainable furniture brand Formabilio . Created by Industrial Designer Stefano Visconti, the clean and contemporary-looking wood fiber containers stack together to form a sculptural piece that you’ll want to proudly display around your home, rather than hide away in a storage closet. Each Lino unit is fully customizable and is available in eight different colors. + Formabilio The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Formabilio , Lino , modular storage boxes , modular storage units , reader submitted content , Stefano Visconti , wood fiber

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Lino Modular Wooden Storage Units Clean Up Your Mess in Style

Chair Farm: Werner Aisslinger Creates Chairs from Living Trees!

April 25, 2012 by  
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Designer Werner Aisslinger unveiled a brilliant living chair at this year’s Milan Design Week that is grown from the ground up instead of being produced in a factory. The green chair consists of a live plant that is growing in a specialized shape set by a steel mold. When the mold is removed, it leaves behind a naturally cultivated seat to perch upon. Read the rest of Chair Farm: Werner Aisslinger Creates Chairs from Living Trees! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: chair farm , eco furniture , green design , growing furniture , hemp chair , home gardening , home grown chair , milan furniture fair 2012 , milan salone 2012 , Nicolo Lanfranchi , sustainable design , Urban Farming , Werner Aisslinger

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Chair Farm: Werner Aisslinger Creates Chairs from Living Trees!

Urban Ruins: Abandoned Building Houses Architecture Academy

March 2, 2011 by  
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[ By Delana in Art & Design , Nature & Ecosystems , Science & Research .

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Urban Ruins: Abandoned Building Houses Architecture Academy

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