Lego-like kindergarten sparks creativity with a playful brick facade

May 17, 2018 by  
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Brick may often be seen as boring and traditional, but that’s not the case when the material falls into the hands of KIENTRUC O . The Vietnamese architecture studio creatively used the ancient building block to breathe life into Ho Chi Minh City’s new Chuon Chuon Kim 2 Kindergarten located in the city’s District 2. The building is made entirely from bare brick arranged in patterns to form an eye-catching and playful facade that also promotes natural ventilation. Likened to a “giant Lego building,” the Chuon Chuon Kim 2 Kindergarten features perforated brick walls with sections painted vibrant yellow for a spectacular effect. While a playful atmosphere conducive to exploration was crucial in the design, the architects also wanted to create a space that felt calm and relaxed. To that end, the building is organized around a central active core that branches out to serene  classroom settings. “Instilled within the school is an openness with a spark of curiosity that allows people of all ages to venture and explore the space in a relaxing and calming atmosphere,” the architects wrote. “As we have engaged in numerous educational projects, we recognize that these experiences are equally as important as the responsibility of nurturing the kids. It invokes a sense of pride, and interests within the teacher and the staffs. It inspires and embraces them, for they have chosen to dedicate their life for the education and the well-being of the children on a daily basis.” Related: This stunning brick “cave house” in Vietnam is open to the elements Each floor features alternating patterns that encourages children to become more attuned to their surroundings. The walls are punctuated by large windows for continuous views inside and out. Access to daylight , cross breezes and a natural material palette help promote a healthful environment. A rooftop garden tops the building with panoramic views of the Saigon River. + KIENTRUC O Via ArchDaily Images by Hiroyuki Oki

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Lego-like kindergarten sparks creativity with a playful brick facade

This garden house grows enough food for three generations of one family

April 14, 2017 by  
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Vietnamese firm Vo Trong Nhia Architects are no strangers to bringing green space indoors, but their new Binh House can actually grow enough food for three generations of one large family. The architects were charged with creating a comfortable home with greenery on every level, and they responded with a lush design that balances communal family areas with individual spaces, all right in the middle of a busy neighborhood. The concrete home, which is located in a high density neighborhood in Ho Chi Minh City , is a large space that houses a family of three generations. Further challenging was the fact that many heavily populated cities in Vietnam are destroying natural tropical green spaces to meet the needs of the population . As part of the architect’s ongoing “House for Trees” series, Vo Trong Nhia Architects used the Binh House design to reconnect the family space with nature, creating a veritable jungle inside the home. Related: Abandoned greenhouse transformed into gorgeous glass office filled with trees The home is a multi-level design stacked lush green spaces on every floor. Large sliding glass doors allow for optimal natural light throughout the home. The glass separations also help create an open space at the inner core of the home where family members can easily interact between the rooms. The home is filled with green plants and large trees that shade the interior spaces, providing a nice, even temperature throughout the home. Additionally, the green spaces, many already vertical, offer flexible growing options for the large family. To further reduce energy consumption , the service areas including the kitchen, bathrooms, stairs and hallways are located on the west side of the home. This strategy blocks the family areas from excessive heat radiation, helping cool the home during the hot summer months and reducing the need for air conditioning. Along with the greenery and specific layout strategies, building with sustainable materials such as natural stone, wood, and exposed concrete also help create the home’s pleasant microclimate. + Vo Trong Nhia Architects Via Archdaily Photography via Hiroyuki Oki, Quang Dam

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This garden house grows enough food for three generations of one family

Green Rollercoaster High-Rise Takes Off in Vietnam

June 18, 2010 by  
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No, this is not the latest roller coaster — it’s actually a self-sustaining community designed by DWP Architects in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Noticed at Designboom , ‘Everrich 2 Apartments’ is a massive mixed-use community that broke ground earlier this year. A combination of retail, public and private spaces, Everrich 2 also boasts a number of notable green features inside and out

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Green Rollercoaster High-Rise Takes Off in Vietnam

What Happens If BP Never Plugs the Gulf Oil Spill?

June 18, 2010 by  
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It’s the ultimate nightmare scenario: all of BP ’s attempts to stanch the Gulf Oil disaster (including drilling relief wells) fail. Not only do the relief wells fail, but the broken pipe starts leaking in other places and the sea floor starts to collapse from growing instability. The result is a massive rift in the ocean floor that spews upwards of two billion gallons of oil into the Gulf before the reservoir is exhausted

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What Happens If BP Never Plugs the Gulf Oil Spill?

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