Redesigned Flow Hive 2 snags whopping $13.6 million on Indiegogo

March 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Redesigned Flow Hive 2 snags whopping $13.6 million on Indiegogo

Record-smashing crowdfunding project Flow Hive offered honey on tap: a beehive that makes it easier for beekeepers to harvest honey. Over 50,000 Flow Hives have gone out to 130 countries around the world, and now the Australian father-son team behind the design are back. The pair redesigned their groundbreaking hive, drawing on customer feedback and adding brand new features, and took to Indiegogo again with the Flow Hive 2 for a campaign that was just 18,983 percent funded. Flow Hive 2’s design is simple: inside a body comprised of laser-cut sustainable Western red cedar rest Flow Frames, which Stuart Anderson and Cedar Anderson, father and son, describe as “the most revolutionary beekeeping invention since the Langstroth hive was designed in 1852.” The frames are partially built honeycomb: add bees to do their thing — covering the honeycomb in wax, completing the cells, filling them with honey, and capping with wax — and then, when it’s time to harvest the honey, beekeepers insert and turn a handle to allow channels to form inside. The honey flows down into a waiting jar with minimal disturbance to the bees, who “are left to be, still standing on their wax capping.” A few hours later the bees realize the honeycomb is empty and they get right back to work, busy as bees. Related: How a simple honey harvester demonstrates the sweet success of viral crowdfunding campaign The Flow Hive 2 features an adjustable hive stand making it easier to set up on uneven ground. A multi-functional tray helps beekeepers trap pests. Deeper handles, a ventilation control system, a harvesting shelf, and observation windows on both sides are among the other upgrades to the hive. Beekeepers can obtain around five-and-a-half to six-and-a-half-pounds of honey per frame. The Flow Hive 2 costs $932; earlybird backers snagged it for $699. The Indiegogo campaign is over, raising an incredible $13,662,173. But it seems Flow Hive’s journey is really just beginning. You can find out more on the campaign page or their website . + Flow Hive + Flow Hive 2 Indiegogo Image via Flow Hive

See original here:
Redesigned Flow Hive 2 snags whopping $13.6 million on Indiegogo

Natural wetland in India filters 198 million gallons of wastewater a day with zero chemicals

March 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Natural wetland in India filters 198 million gallons of wastewater a day with zero chemicals

The East Kolkata Wetlands in India processes almost 198 million gallons of wastewater and sewage produced by the region’s population everyday, relying on nothing but nature. What was once a mix of lowland salt marshes and silted rivers is now a sprawling complex of man-made wetlands framed by green space. With the help of local farmers and fishers, the wetlands are maintained in good health to organically clean sewage using sunlight, oxygen, and beneficial microbes. This process, known as bio-remediation, cleans wastewater within three weeks, a remarkably quick turnaround that highlights the great power of natural solutions. Wastewater from the city is directed into small inlets, each one controlled by a local fishery cooperative. The cooperative then separates the dense polluted water from clearer surface water, which flows into the large wetland while the wastewater decomposes and becomes fish food through organic processes. This water is then used to raise fish in ponds known as bheries or grow crops on the banks of the wetlands. In addition to its wastewater and agriculture services, the East Kolkata Wetlands also act as a flood control system, absorbing excess water from the nearby city. Related: Dakshineswar Skywalk could greatly improve pedestrian safety in Kolkata Former city sanitation engineer Dhrubajyoti Ghosh has served as the Wetland’s guardian for several decades. After realizing the enormous value of the wetland’s environmental services, he defined the formal limits of the area and successfully protected it from real estate developers. Today, Ghosh recognizes the challenges and opportunities facing the wetlands and others like it. “I am still learning how this delicate ecosystem works, how to further refine it, and why some places are better suited than others,” he told The Better India . “I am happy to give any advice or help absolutely free, this is the best system of its kind in the world and could be helping millions of people. If I have failed in one thing it is this; not enough people know about it or are benefiting from it.” Via The Better India Images via East Kolkata Wetlands Management Authority and  The Better India

See original here: 
Natural wetland in India filters 198 million gallons of wastewater a day with zero chemicals

Studio Gang designs massive paper tube Hive for the National Building Museum

April 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Studio Gang designs massive paper tube Hive for the National Building Museum

The National Building Museum has welcomed giant ball pits , mazes , and icebergs into its historic Great Hall, and this year the Washington, D.C. museum will welcome yet another imaginative creation: the Hive. Architecture firm Studio Gang designed the latest installation for the Museum’s Summer Block Party series that commissions larger-than-life temporary structures. The massive Hive will be built from thousands of recyclable paper tubes stacked to reach 60 feet in height. Built with over 2,700 wound paper tubes , the Hive will soar to the uppermost reaches of the museum and take on a curved form reminiscent of Saarinen’s Gateway Arch in St. Louis and even a spider’s web. The tubes, which vary in size, are interlocked to create three interconnected domed chambers, the largest of which has an oculus over 10 feet in diameter. The tubes will have a reflective silver exterior and a bright magenta interior. “When you enter the Great Hall you almost feel like you’re in an outside space because of the distance sound travels before it is reflected back and made audible,” said Studio Gang founding principal Jeanne Gang. “We’ve designed a series of chambers shaped by sound that are ideally suited for intimate conversations and gatherings as well as performances and acoustic experimentation. Using wound paper tubes, a common building material with unique sonic properties, and interlocking them to form a catenary dome, we create a hive for these activities, bringing people together to explore and engage the senses.” Related: ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C. The Hive will open to the public July 4 until September 4, 2017. A full schedule of concerts, tours, talks, and programs will be hosted alongside the installation . + Studio Gang Images via National Building Museum

Excerpt from:
Studio Gang designs massive paper tube Hive for the National Building Museum

Air-purifying pavilion uses plants to absorb harmful toxins in Hanoi

April 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Air-purifying pavilion uses plants to absorb harmful toxins in Hanoi

A green oasis has popped up in Hanoi , a city choked by smog. Hung Nguyen Architects designed and built the Pavilion of Origins, a greenery-draped structure that uses living plants to purify the air. Set on the terrace of a three-story house in Hanoi, the pavilion is minimal and modern with a simple palette of green leafy plants, white upcycled steed frames, and a light gray pebble floor. Hanoi ranks among the worst in the world for air pollution with traffic congestion blamed as the leading cause. In an attempt to bring a breath of fresh air to the city, Hung Nguyen Architects created a pavilion covered with a wide variety of plants, including the peace lily and snake plant, selected for their air-purifying and decorative qualities. The plants are arranged inside and around a collection of simple white cuboid frames of varying sizes built of upcycled steel. A translucent polycarbonate roof allows natural light to pour through while reducing solar radiation. The white frames and light-colored pebble floor keep the focus on the plants, which grow and spread on multiple levels. White netting on the tops of the larger cuboid frames can be used as hammocks for relaxation. Related: 7 indoor plants that purify the air around you naturally “In Pavilion of the Origins, trees and plants play a role as the main users for the amount of time they spent in this space, while the pavilion owners act as the servants who have the duties to take care of those main users and subsequently be paid in clean, fresh air, as well as experiencing the vivid beauty of the natural origins,” wrote the architects. “This slender structure is just a minimal intervention of human to nature. Architecture, in this sense, acts as a rope to tighten up the interaction and connection between humans and nature.” + Hung Nguyen Architects Via ArchDaily Images via Hung Nguyen Architects

View original post here: 
Air-purifying pavilion uses plants to absorb harmful toxins in Hanoi

Wolfgang Buttress Hive is brought back to life in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew

June 17, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Wolfgang Buttress Hive is brought back to life in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew

First installed at the world expo last spring, the multi-award-winning Hive was disassembled at the end of the event and moved to the Kew Gardens, where it was reassembled as the UK’s first-ever rebuilt Expo pavilion. Its lattice-like design was inspired by the lifespan of the honeybee and “highlights the important role of bees and other pollinators in feeding the planet,” says Stage One. The complex structure comprises nearly 170,000 parts assembled in 32 horizontal layers with hexagonal cells for a metal honeycomb effect. Each piece was etched with a reference number to make reassembly a possibility. Related: Wolfgang Buttress-Led Team Wins Bid to Design 2015 UK Milan Expo Pavilion More than just an elaborate artwork, the Hive serves an educational purpose and guides visitors through a multi-sensory experience simulating a real beehive . An array of almost 1,000 LEDs line the Hive’s internal void and are complemented with orchestral sound recordings. Sensors that monitor activity within a real beehive at Kew control the light and sound intensity. The Hive will stay at the London gardens until the end of 2017. + Wolfgang Buttress + Stage One Via Dezeen Images via Stage One

See more here:
Wolfgang Buttress Hive is brought back to life in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew

“Hive” by Philip de los Reyes Brings Architectural Style to Backyard Beekeeping

September 10, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on “Hive” by Philip de los Reyes Brings Architectural Style to Backyard Beekeeping

Honey bees are some very hard-working ladies. Why not show them a little love with a beautiful, comfortable place to come home to after a hard day of pollinating? Industrial designer Philip de los Reyes has designed artificial hives that incorporate modern style with traditional apiary layouts. Crafted with both professional and amateur beekeepers in mind, the structures attempt to combine the functional with the fashionable, adding a splash of color and architectural elements to the boxes. Read the rest of “Hive” by Philip de los Reyes Brings Architectural Style to Backyard Beekeeping Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: backyard beekeeping , Hive , honey bees , langstroth hive , philip de los reyes , San Francisco

Go here to read the rest: 
“Hive” by Philip de los Reyes Brings Architectural Style to Backyard Beekeeping

The Hive Apartment is a Graffiti Lover’s Green Dream Home in Melbourne

June 26, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Hive Apartment is a Graffiti Lover’s Green Dream Home in Melbourne

Read the rest of The Hive Apartment is a Graffiti Lover’s Green Dream Home in Melbourne Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , eco design , eco home , graffiti , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green home , green renovation , Hive , hive apartment , itn architects , Melbourne , melbourne home , prowla , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , sustainable home , tagged , tagging , zvi belling

Go here to see the original: 
The Hive Apartment is a Graffiti Lover’s Green Dream Home in Melbourne

How Honeybees Clean House (Video)

December 10, 2011 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on How Honeybees Clean House (Video)

Honeybees are known for their fascinating social structures. Here’s some incredible footage of one colony cleaning their hive after a rainstorm.

View original post here: 
How Honeybees Clean House (Video)

Ugly Utility Boxes Become Sweet Public Art in San Jose

December 10, 2011 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Ugly Utility Boxes Become Sweet Public Art in San Jose

A public project in San Jose is turning ugly utility boxes into works of art.

Original post: 
Ugly Utility Boxes Become Sweet Public Art in San Jose

Bad Behavior has blocked 2556 access attempts in the last 7 days.