Climate change leads to earliest cherry blossoming on record

April 1, 2021 by  
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The earliest cherry blossoming ever recorded is happening in Kyoto, Japan. While a colorful bust of cherry blossoms is not uncommon at this time of the year, the peak flowering season in 2021 has come earlier than has ever been recorded. Scientists now link this phenomenon to the warm spring experienced in the Northern Hemisphere. Cherry blossom season has been officially documented in Japan since the year 812 CE, with data indicating that the earliest blooming date witnessed in history occurred on March 27, 1409. The Japan Meteorological Agency started collecting data on peak bloom in Kyoto in 1953. Historically, the cherries start flowering in March, but the majority of buds open around April 17, based on historical data. Related: Climate change is causing spring to come earlier in national parks Climate change and other factors have affected this event, leading to earlier blooms in the past century. Scientists say that full bloom has been repeatedly recorded around April 5 in the past 100 years. But by Friday, March 26, 2021, the full bloom event had already passed, several days before April. “Evidence, like the timing of cherry blossoms, is one of the historical ‘proxy’ measurements that scientists look at to reconstruct past climate,” climate scientist Michael Mann told the Washington Post . “In this case, that ‘proxy’ is telling us something that quantitative, rigorous long-term climate reconstructions have already told us — that the human-caused warming of the planet we’re witnessing today is unprecedented going back millennia.” The blooming of Japanese mountain cherries has been  documented  732 times since the 9th century. This is the longest record of a seasonal phenomenon that occurs naturally anywhere in the world. Scientists say that throughout the 1,200-year-long record of cherry blossom blooms, there have been clear trends that point to climate change . Scientists have noted that the mountain cherries started flowering earlier in the 1830s. The situation got worse between 1971 and 2000, with records showing that flowering came at least a week earlier than previously recorded averages. Among the factors that are linked to the early blooming include deforestation and building construction. Regional climate change accounts for about 2.2°C change, which accounts for about 5 days of  earlier flowering . Via Science Alert Image via Vcentee Alvarado

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Climate change leads to earliest cherry blossoming on record

Artist draws attention to the single-use plastic crisis

April 1, 2021 by  
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New York City is famously a center for culture and creativity in the U.S. But even in a city that’s filled with so much to see and do, one art exhibit is standing out among the crowd. Artist Dionnys Matos is using art to draw attention to sustainability and why it matters so much, what it means for the Earth and how it can be used as an influence to create beautiful things. Matos recycles and reuses items like foam bowls, plastic cups, bubble wrap and packaging materials in his art. His work focuses on what single-use objects really mean and the impact they have. Related: News From the Future imagines iconic landmarks after a climate apocalypse One work, titled “Wave”, is a four-panel mural created with bubble wrap that was injected with acrylic. According to Matos, this work showcases how our oceans are being overtaken by plastic . In this piece, the sea is getting its revenge. The still-life nature of “The Nature of Things” invites viewers to pause and draw awareness to their surroundings, the objects they interact with daily and how these objects impact the surroundings in the long-term. “Do we destroy our environment, or do we adapt? Are we capable of reusing that which is at the service of our comfort?” the project statement asks. The exhibit, titled Take a Minute: A Show of Resilience, is on display at the Thomas Nickles Project gallery at 47 Orchard Street in New York City. This gallery focuses exclusively on contemporary Cuban art . The pieces will be on display until April 18, and more information about the exhibit is available online . “I link these works with the environment in favor of an ecological conscience, Adopting dynamics inspired by the conservation of nature,” the artist said of the exhibit. “I work with recycled art with disposable materials that are not biodegradable; In these works I use bubble wrap giving it a utilitarian purpose, with the main objective of creating awareness of the dangers that threaten the planet and promote its conservation , enhance communication and citizen participation in the defense of nature and encourage political commitment in pursuit of this.” Matos trained at the Professional Academy of Plastic Arts and lives in Bogotá, Colombia. He continues to work on projects that will promote recycling and raise awareness of environmental issues. Matos joins many artists who are calling attention to the environmental issues — and possible solutions — of our world. Throughout history, artists have always captured the world as they see it, freezing a moment in time for successive generations to enjoy … and ponder. + Thomas Nickles Project Images via Thomas Nickles Project

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Artist draws attention to the single-use plastic crisis

Japanese Architects Protest Against Zaha Hadid’s Enormous Olympic Stadium

October 10, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Japanese Architects Protest Against Zaha Hadid’s Enormous Olympic Stadium Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2020 Olympic Stadium , eco design , Fumihiko Maki , green design , Japanese architects against Zaha Hadid , Japanese architects protest against Zaha Hadid’s Olympic design , Re-thinking the New National Olympic Stadium in the Historical Context of Gaein , sustainable design , Zaha Hadid Olympics        

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Japanese Architects Protest Against Zaha Hadid’s Enormous Olympic Stadium

Christian Tagliavini Creates Historical Portraits of Women’s Fashion Out of Cardboard

April 1, 2012 by  
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Do these ladies look a tad stiff? What you’re looking at is one of Swiss-Italian artist-photographer Christian Tagliavini ‘s “cardboard ladies,” a series of portraits showing women’s fashion through the ages, made out of cardboard. From ruff-collared Elizabethan gowns to 1950s ensembles, Tagliavini’s portraits show the transient nature of fashion. Click through to Ecouterre to see all of the cardboard ladies. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , cardboard ladies , Christian Tagliavini , Fashion , Photography , portraits

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Christian Tagliavini Creates Historical Portraits of Women’s Fashion Out of Cardboard

Kaohsiung Port Station proposal by AGER Group: Balancing preservation and development

August 6, 2011 by  
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Neha Gargi: Kaohsiung Port Station Designed by AGER Group Located next to the Kaohsiung Port in Yancheng District of Kaohsiung City, Kaohsiung Port Station is a huge, 15.42 hectares long, old site to the rail yards forming a barrier between two of the most important areas of the city the Hamasen and Yancheng districts. Owing to the historical importance of the site, the city government of Kaohsiung organized a design competition to transform the old rail yard into an urban landscape. The design that stood out from the rest of the participants and won the Excellence Award at the competition was conceptualized by the AGER Group’s Boston Studio. Picture Gallery Kaohsiung Port Station Designed by AGER Group Led by Jessica Leete, AGER Group’s design proposal is an excellent example of preserving the heritage of the site and at the same time turn into an urban developmental area. To achieve their goal, AGER proposed a three phased design project for the redevelopment of the site. Each of these phases concentrate on different aspects of the historical Kaohsiung Port Station. Phase one of the project involves three strategies to give a new identity to the site. As the Kaohsiung Port Station is an integral part of the history of evolving Taiwan railway, the designers proposed a transportation and industry museum on the site, thus preserving the historical elements of the site. They also proposed that the railway could be used by the public or during times of special events. The remnant of the rail yard was to be converted into a rail-scape park corridor, dotted with sculptures, restaurants, retail outlets and the old sugar warehouses converted into creative industry lofts. Phase two of the proposal talks about the establishment of a iconic luxury hotel, which would include a conference room and apartments for executives. AGER suggests that this iconic hotel should be designed by a well known architect so as to bring recognition to the area and thus attract more tourists to the rail-scape park corridor and also investors for the phase three of the project. AGER proposes a series of residential buildings, which would have a typology similar to that of the one in the Hamasen district in its third phase of design. Along with that the site would also house a number of commercial complexes, public areas and civic spaces to bring together the people of the nearby areas. Designed in phases AGER’s proposal for the redevelopment of the Kaohsiung Port Station is a well thought out plan that makes best use of the available elements of the heritage site. Not only that AGER’s proposal also takes care of the soil conditions, re-usability of the buildings and recovery from disasters making it very sustainable and practical. Via: Bustler

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Kaohsiung Port Station proposal by AGER Group: Balancing preservation and development

How to make a homemade water distiller

August 6, 2011 by  
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Dipika Sharma: Homemade water distiller Distill water at home using this setup Water is the most important element of life. All life is based on water. Water is essential for the sustainability of life on earth. But sadly the water available in some parts is not pure and is thus unfit for drinking. You obviously can not rely on purchasing water from the market for your everyday needs. Moreover the idea of drinking tap water is beyond consideration for obvious reasons. The only option left with you is to purify the tap water using water purifiers or distillers. You could make your very own water distiller using some simple products. Before that you need to understand what distillation is. Distillation is a process of purifying water by heating it so that it attains its boiling point and starts to form vapors. The water thus attains its purest form, free of any chemicals, bacteria or toxins. Read on to learn how you could make your very own water distiller and ensure your health and that of your family. Difficulty- Moderate Time required: 1 hour Resources required: Metal pot Stainless steel feed-through fitting Plastic hose Glass jug Water Detergent Stove Procedure: 1. Drill holes in the pot Make a hole in the lid of the metal pot. You may use a drill machine. After you have made the hole, insert a feed-through fitting into it. The fitting should be made up of stainless steel. Keep the barbed end of this stainless steel fitting on the outside of the metal pot. 2. Clean the metal pot Make sure that all the component of the distiller are properly cleaned. Use warm water and detergent for washing the components. Clean the metal pot along with its lid, the plastic hose and also the glass jug. Let these dry after you have washed them 3. Place the pot on stove Turn on the stove and place the clean pot on the stove carefully. Fill the pot with water, ideally to 3/4 th of the pot’s capacity. Let the pot heat up. Vapours form when the temperature reaches about 200 degrees Fahrenheit. The vapours travel through the stainless steel pipe inserted through the hole on the lid. Let the steam escape for about 5 minutes from the feed-through fitting. 4. Attach the Plastic Hose After the steam has escaped for about 5 minutes attach the feed-through fitting with a clean plastic hose. This is done to get rid of the remaining contaminants, if any. This will also ensure that you get pure distilled water in the end. Now you can start collecting distilled water in the glass jug by simply placing the free end of the plastic hose inside the jug. The steam condenses and turns into water once again. This water will be very pure. Once you are done with collecting water as per your requirement turn the burner off and let the metal pot cool down in isolation. Frequently asked questions: Q. What are other method of purifying water? You can use a water purifier to get clean water, or you could simply boil the water over a stove and use it. Though this water will not be as pure as distilled water it will still be much safer than the tap water. Quick Tips: Use a cloth to remove the metal pot from the stove. Wash the components with a good quality detergent and make sure they are completely clean. Store the water in bottles. Avoid letting it stay outside without lid. Things to watch out for: Use a good quality plastic hose which is resistant to high temperatures. Do not touch the hot metal pot. Keep an eye on the metal pot to prevent it from burning dry.

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How to make a homemade water distiller

Green Invasion Turns Lima’s Historical Center Into A Park (Photos)

November 11, 2010 by  
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Photo: Genaro Alva. With the goal of recovering the historical center of Peru’s capital city, a group of organizations put together an event called Gran Semana de Lima or Lima’s Great Week, which aimed to create new life in the streets. Among other activities, there was a contest for urban interventions and one of the winners was this amazing project called Green Invasion by architects Genaro Alva, Denise Ampuero, Gloria Andrea Rojas and industrial designer Claudia Ampuero…

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Green Invasion Turns Lima’s Historical Center Into A Park (Photos)

Historic Alaskan Glacier Melt Less Than Previously Thought… But Recent Retreat is Double the Average

February 8, 2010 by  
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photo: Frank Kovalchek via flickr. Here’s one with a decided twist: Scientists from France’s Laboratory for Space Studies in Geophysics and Oceanography are saying that previous studies of how much melting Alaskan and Canadian glaciers have contributed to sea level rise have overestimated the situation.

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Historic Alaskan Glacier Melt Less Than Previously Thought… But Recent Retreat is Double the Average

USDA Organic: 20 years Later

January 10, 2010 by  
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We are coming up on the 20 th anniversary  of the The Organic Food Production Act of 1990 ( 7 U.S.C.A. § 6501-22,  November 28, 1990) in which Congress commissioned the USDA to develop a comprehensive national rule for what could be marketed as “Organic.”   It took until October of 2002 for the “Final Rule” to become law.   The reason the process was so long and contentious was the fundamental philosophical divide between the key parties involved in the public debate about the definition of “Organic.”   Congress had acted because so many people were frightened (unnecessarily as it turned out) by the Alar Issue raised on a “60 Minutes” segment

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USDA Organic: 20 years Later

Rooftop Solar Installations Growing Faster than Utility-Scale Solar

January 10, 2010 by  
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Private solar installations are really taking off nationwide. In just two years, (about the same length of time it takes to get a pair of 250 MW solar power plants approved in California, for example), homeowners and businesses have added that much power to the Californian grid, just from individual rooftops throughout the state. By July last year, 50,000 installations were supplying the California grid with 500 MW of solar power; the equivalent of two average sized solar power plants now under review in the state.

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Rooftop Solar Installations Growing Faster than Utility-Scale Solar

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