A decaying shop in Cambodia gains a new life through adaptive reuse principles

May 23, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A decaying shop in Cambodia gains a new life through adaptive reuse principles

Phnom Penh-based firm  Bloom Architecture has unveiled a beautiful renovation of a decaying building in Kampot, Cambodia. Ages ago, the building housed a family-run store, but the space had been abandoned for years. To preserve its historical significance in the riverside town, the architects focused on maintaining the building’s original features as much as possible while turning it into a home and restaurant. The result is 3,444 square feet of breezy interior spaces with an  adaptive reuse strategy that blends the best of traditional Chinese shophouse typology with modern day comfort. Located next to the city’s river, the building is a local landmark for the community. When the owners wanted to adapt the structure into a new family residence on the top floors and a restaurant on the ground floor, they tasked Bloom Architecture with the job of preserving the building’s historical character through adaptive reuse. To bring the older building into the modern age, the firm focused its renovation plans on retaining the original features. Starting with the exterior, which is marked by two floors of large arched openings, the facade was put through a deep cleaning and fresh paint job with a natural exterior that blurs the boundaries between the old and the new. A new wooden roof overhang juts out over the top floor, providing shade for the upper balcony . Related: An ancient Jaipur palace property is transformed into a modern restaurant After years of decay, much of the interior was in pretty bad shape, so the firm went about gutting everything that was not salvageable. However, the team was able to reuse wooden panels from the original house; these panels were repurposed into custom furniture and windows. The ground floor is open and airy with various seating options. Wooden tables and chairs of all shapes and sizes fill the dining area, which boasts double-height ceilings with exposed wooden beams. The original brick walls were lightly coated in white paint, letting the various red-hued tones shine through to offer contrast to the all-white columns and wooden door frames. A large metal spiral staircase runs through a central courtyard all the way up from the restaurant to the private living quarters. This stairwell was essential to the design, as it allows  natural light  to reach the lower levels and aids in natural ventilation, cooling the interiors off during the searing summer months. At the top of the staircase is what the architects call “the nest” — an open-air terrace that provides stunning views of the mountainous landscape of Kampot. + Bloom Architecture Images via Bloom Architecture

Continued here:
A decaying shop in Cambodia gains a new life through adaptive reuse principles

Little Caesars debuts vegan sausage

May 23, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Little Caesars debuts vegan sausage

Vegetarians have finally pushed Little Caesars past its tipping point. After years of clamoring for better vegetarian and vegan pizza options, Little Caesars is now offering a plant-based sausage, or impossible meat, made by California-based Impossible Foods . This is the first time a national pizza chain has offered a vegan meat substitute. Before vegans get too excited, note that initially only three markets will feature the faux sausage: Fort Myers, Florida, Albuquerque, New Mexico and Yakima, Washington. However, the new Impossible Supreme Pizza will still not be 100 percent vegan as it’s topped with dairy cheese. Little Caesars is not the first place most vegans would look for a meal. But as demand for plant-based products grow, even meat-heavy restaurants are taking notice. Last year sales in plant-based products increased 17 percent, compared with a 2 percent overall growth rate in the grocer sector, according to Nielson. “It’s here to stay,” said Little Caesars CEO David Scrivano. Impossible Foods’ vegan sausage is made from similar ingredients to their burgers, such as legume hemoglobin derived from soy. According to the company website, “Although heme has been consumed every day for hundreds of thousands of years, Impossible Foods discovered that it’s what makes meat taste like meat. We make the Impossible Burger using heme from soy plants — identical to the heme from animals — which is what gives it its uniquely meaty flavor.” Even meat eaters might want to try the pizza made with this impossible meat. According to Medical News Today , a recent study showed that eating red meat even occasionally could shorten your life. Red and processed meat consumption has been linked to diabetes, coronary heart disease and some types of cancer. So the less meat you eat, the better for you, and the better for animals. Impossible Foods reports that more than 7,000 restaurants now offer their products, including such traditionally vegan-unfriendly chains as White Castle, Burger King and Red Robin.  The company is increasing its production capacity at its Oakland, California manufacturing plant. This summer a second production line will double its output. Via CNBC Image via Michael Rivera

More here:
Little Caesars debuts vegan sausage

An old Brooklyn sugar refinery becomes creative office spaces

March 28, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on An old Brooklyn sugar refinery becomes creative office spaces

A historic waterfront factory has been given a new lease on life thanks to New York-based architecture firm ODA and Triangle Assets. Located at 10 Jay Street in DUMBO, New York City, the project explores both adaptive reuse and historic preservation in its transformation of the former Arbuckle Brothers sugar refinery into creative office spaces. The sensitive renovation updates the building to modern standards while carefully preserving its history, from the restrained industrial-inspired material palette to a new reflective facade that evokes sugar crystals. Built in 1898, the massive structure first served as the Arbuckle Brothers’ sugar refinery. After the building was converted into a winery , the front structure of the building was torn down, leaving only three of the original facades intact. The building then remained vacant and abandoned for 50 years until real estate agency Triangle Assets purchased the property with aims of renovation. To that end, Triangle Assets tapped ODA to turn the 230,000-square-foot warehouse and its 10 stories into flexible offices that overlook panoramic views of Manhattan and Williamsburg’s waterfront. The interiors are also minimally dressed in exposed brick and steel in a nod to the site’s industrial heritage. Existing historical features, such as the terracotta arches and octagonal columns, were restored and exposed. The building is also embedded in Brooklyn Bridge Park, making it the only privately owned building in the park thanks to the owner’s donation of nearly 15,000 square feet of land to the park. The new crystalline west facade reflects the park and sunsets over the river. Related: Brooklyn’s new Domino Park features relics from the old sugar factory “As the conversation surrounding heritage and preservation grows, 10 Jay Street is a prime example of how cities around the world recover and readapt buildings,” a press release on the project said. “The design dared to challenge the way landmark buildings are seen and, in doing so, created unique threads to link old with new, the industrial age with the digital era, and create a product for the modern age.” + ODA Photography by Pavel Bendov via ODA

View original post here: 
An old Brooklyn sugar refinery becomes creative office spaces

MVRDV to dramatically revitalize Frances historic Palais du Commerce

February 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on MVRDV to dramatically revitalize Frances historic Palais du Commerce

Dutch design firm MVRDV has won a competition to renovate and expand the historic Palais du Commerce in Rennes, France. The impressive 19th century palace had once served multiple public functions but now suffers from disconnect with current civic life. Working in collaboration with co-architects Bernard Desmoulin for developers Frey and Engie Avenue, MVRDV plans to reactivate the former public building and transform it into an inviting mixed-use destination that will serve as the centerpiece of the city’s main commercial street. The 18,000-square-meter redevelopment project will include not only a building restoration with a modern 6,000-square-meter timber expansion of the Palais du Commerce, but also the reactivation of the surroundings including the transformation of the Place de la République into a pedestrian-friendly public square as well as the conversion of the Rue du Pré Botté into a landscaped pedestrian area. The landmark building will also be updated with a sensitive approach that will be respectful of its iconic 19th-century design while greatly increasing the building’s transparency. In addition to the replacement of existing windows with larger panes of glass, glazed storefronts will be added to the arches of the arcade and a new grand, winding staircase will anchor the center of the facade. “Not only is Palais du Commerce a local landmark, but its transformation will turn the Place de la République into a popular destination and act as a vital catalyst for its surroundings,” says Nathalie de Vries, founding partner of MVRDV. “Our design approaches this task with an appreciation of the building’s history, but also with an eye towards the future, helping Rennes to achieve its urban vision. The additions that we will make are clearly modern in character, clearly showcasing this design as the latest chapter in the building’s storied history.” Related: MVRDV designs solar-powered “KoolKiel” with Jenga-like architecture in Germany The building’s mixed-use program will include new shops, a hotel, offices, a co-working space, a variety of leisure spaces — including a LEGO museum, event space and an electronic music bar — and a school for the kitchen and hotel industry led by chef Thierry Marx. All spaces of the building will be used more effectively, from the basements to the roof, which will include a new bistro in the building’s central dome. Construction on the project is slated to begin in 2022, with completion expected in 2025. + MVRDV Images via ENGRAM, diagrams via MVRDV

More here: 
MVRDV to dramatically revitalize Frances historic Palais du Commerce

SCAD students save a piece of American history with vintage train car restoration

June 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on SCAD students save a piece of American history with vintage train car restoration

The Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)’s award-winning tradition of historic preservation hit another home run for Preservation Month. SCAD students salvaged a piece of American history that would have otherwise disappeared when they restored of a rare 1911 wooden passenger train car. The students turned the railroad preservation project into an educational opportunity and intentionally left parts of the train car in its found state to teach visitors about the preservation process. Owned by the nonprofit Coastal Heritage Society , the decrepit rare train car was originally brought to the Georgia State Railroad Museum from the city of Augusta. As part of a spring student project, three graduate and eight undergraduate SCAD students carefully restored the 1911 train car to complement the SCAD Museum of Art, an adaptive reuse project that turned an 1853 antebellum railroad depot into a modern museum. The train car is currently displayed alongside the museum. Related: SCAD Students Transform an Atlanta Parking Garage into Ecologically Responsible Micro-Housing Community “SCAD knows well the stories of Georgia’s railways—our award-winning SCAD Museum of Art rises proudly from the ruins of the nation’s oldest surviving antebellum railroad depot,” said SCAD President and Founder, Paula Wallace. “Now, the nation’s premier preservation design program helps narrate another tale for the appreciation of railfans for generations to come.” Students’ preservation work included replacing the train car’s exterior wood siding, refinishing woodwork, and stripping the original mahogany panels of layers of paint and shellac. + Savannah College of Art and Design Images by Dylan Wilson

Read the original post: 
SCAD students save a piece of American history with vintage train car restoration

Buffalo’s Grain Elevators to Be Used in Large-Scale Narrative Lighting Dislpay

May 13, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Buffalo’s Grain Elevators to Be Used in Large-Scale Narrative Lighting Dislpay

Read the rest of Buffalo’s Grain Elevators to Be Used in Large-Scale Narrative Lighting Dislpay Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: adaptive reuse , Ambiances Design Production , Art , buffalo , Buffalo Harbor , grain elevators , historic preservation , lighting display , New York. , preservation , public art , Silos , upstate New York , Western New York        

Here is the original post: 
Buffalo’s Grain Elevators to Be Used in Large-Scale Narrative Lighting Dislpay

Jean Vollum Natural Capital Center Renovation in Portland Combines Green Design with Historic Preservation

March 8, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Jean Vollum Natural Capital Center Renovation in Portland Combines Green Design with Historic Preservation

Read the rest of Jean Vollum Natural Capital Center Renovation in Portland Combines Green Design with Historic Preservation Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “leed” , “office building” , Certification , eco-friendly , Ecotrust , green renovation , green roof , historic preservation , holst architecture , innovation , Jean Vollum Natural Capital Center , LEED gold , Oregon , Patagonia , Portland , Recycled Materials , retention , reuse , storm water filtration

Continued here: 
Jean Vollum Natural Capital Center Renovation in Portland Combines Green Design with Historic Preservation

MIT’s Cheetah Robot Could Soon Match its Real-Life Counterpart in Efficiency

March 8, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on MIT’s Cheetah Robot Could Soon Match its Real-Life Counterpart in Efficiency

Last year, we reported that MIT’s cheetah robot broke the speed record for four-legged robots by running at 18mph. Now, MIT researchers say that their robotic version of the wild cat may soon outpace its animal counterpart in running efficiency ! The robot’s streamlined stride and its lightweight electric motors produce high torque with very little energy wasted. Read the rest of MIT’s Cheetah Robot Could Soon Match its Real-Life Counterpart in Efficiency Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: all terrain robot , bigdog , bigdog robot , Boston Dynamics , cheetah , darpa , ls3 , power arm , robots , us army robot

View post: 
MIT’s Cheetah Robot Could Soon Match its Real-Life Counterpart in Efficiency

Frank Lloyd Wright House in Phoenix Still Faces Demolition After Anonymous Buyer Retracts Offer

November 14, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Frank Lloyd Wright House in Phoenix Still Faces Demolition After Anonymous Buyer Retracts Offer

Read the rest of Frank Lloyd Wright House in Phoenix Still Faces Demolition After Anonymous Buyer Retracts Offer Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 8081 meridian , city of phoenix , david wright house , demolition of frank lloyd wright house , frank lloyd wright , historic preservation , landmark status protection , most significant american architect , most significant architectural work in Phoenix , phoenix , Phoenix City Council

See original here:
Frank Lloyd Wright House in Phoenix Still Faces Demolition After Anonymous Buyer Retracts Offer

SCAD Students Attend Class in a Spectacular Restored Medieval Century Village in Southern France

October 22, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on SCAD Students Attend Class in a Spectacular Restored Medieval Century Village in Southern France

Read the rest of SCAD Students Attend Class in a Spectacular Restored Medieval Century Village in Southern France Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: french architecture , historic preservation , marquis de sade , provence architecture , restoration architecture , SCAD , scad architecture , SCAD Lacoste , southern french architecture , village restoration

Go here to read the rest: 
SCAD Students Attend Class in a Spectacular Restored Medieval Century Village in Southern France

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1160 access attempts in the last 7 days.