The Felderhof House in Italy is built into the ground and topped with a green roof

April 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Felderhof House in Italy is built into the ground and topped with a green roof

In the Eisack Valley of Italy, an old “pair farmstead” structure partly built into the hillside years ago still remains. The new owner decided to turn this classic property into a proper home after living inside it for two years as it was, and chose Pavol Mikolajcak Architekten for the redesign. The partially underground extension is topped by a grassy green roof that serves as an homage to the old design as well as a minimal approach to interacting with the natural environment. A newer building was constructed to connect to the older structure, causing the entire house to extend from east to west, hidden within the mountain. Both buildings are linked using a natural stone staircase, and two long skylights serve as limited visible proof of the underground home. From the southern vantage point, a side of concrete and glass serves as a window, making the outer valley visible from inside. Related: Green-roofed home cantilevers over a remote mountainside in Argentina As would be expected in an underground dwelling, the interior decoration is made up of natural colors. Wooden planks line the walls, and the ceiling is primarily made from the same exposed concrete visible from the green roof . Furnishings also consist of shades of brown, and the home includes a clean-lined, minimalist kitchen. There are views of the Eisack Valley and Dolomites Mountains from both the living and sleeping rooms. Although the home is mostly underground, the architects managed to include high ceilings and open spaces within the home, adding a modern element. Occupants enjoy natural light throughout the house thanks to the large skylights . The architects hoped that this home would forge a connection between the old and new, adding a modern twist to the house while maintaining respect for the original historical property. Using eco-conscious materials  — such as natural stone, exposed concrete, steel and wood — that complement the surrounding mountainous region, the architects created an extraordinary home that has only increased in historic value. + Pavol Mikolajcak Architekten Via ArchDaily Photography by Oskar DaRiz via Pavol Mikolajcak Architekten

See the rest here:
The Felderhof House in Italy is built into the ground and topped with a green roof

Scientists find a way to produce renewable energy from snow

April 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scientists find a way to produce renewable energy from snow

Solar panels have trouble producing renewable energy whenever it snows. With winters expected to increase in severity because of  climate change , generating power in the cold, snowy season will likely become a major issue in years to come. Fortunately, scientists from UCLA just invented a way to produce energy from snow. The researchers call their handy device a snow-based triboelectric nanogenerator (snow TENG). It works by generating power via static electricity. As explained by the lead scientist on the project, Richard Kaner, static electricity happens when a material that likes to give up electrons comes into contact with a material that captures them. Snow naturally carries a positive charge and gives electrons away freely, making it the perfect material to generate power. According to UCLA , the snow TENG is made out of silicone, which has a negative charge and actively captures positive electrons. Once the material gains positive electrons, the device gathers those charges and turns them into electricity. “The device can work in remote areas, because it provides its own power and does not need batteries,” Kaner shared. Kaner noted that the device does much more than produce renewable energy . The snow TENG can also calculate snow fall averages and tell you wind speed and direction. Kaner and his team hope to integrate their device into existing solar panels, which would give homeowners the option of producing plentiful energy throughout the year, not just in the warmer seasons. In addition to generating electricity, the device can also be used to track performance in winter sports. The TENG can monitor things like jumping, walking or running and can be easily added to the bottom of shoes given its flexibility. With further development, it is possible that the snow TENG will lead to other athletic monitoring devices that are completely self-powered. It is unclear when Kaner and his team plan to make their device available to the larger public. They produced the prototype using a 3D printer , an electrode and some silicone, making it one of the cheapest renewable energy devices on the market. + UCLA Via Gizmodo Image via Pixabay

More: 
Scientists find a way to produce renewable energy from snow

Long Story Short hostel is a modern escape tucked into a historical building in Moravia

November 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Long Story Short hostel is a modern escape tucked into a historical building in Moravia

A 17th century brick building in the historical capital city of Moravia, Czech Republic , now houses a gorgeous hostel that preserves the story of the place. Named Long Story Short, the hostel infuses the original building with a contemporary feel and combines raw materials with vintage furniture. Prague-based Denisa Strmiskova Studio renovated the building by highlighting its history, while enriching it with contemporary design. The horseshoe-shaped building sits in the historical center of Olomouc, the ecclesiastical metropolis and historical capital city of Moravia. The architects’ main idea was to create the whole concept of the hostel from scratch, including all its equipment and visual layout. Related: Almáa Sintra Hostel Is An Idyllic Eco-Retreat on a Historic 12th Site in Portugal An organically arched hall , which leads from the reception to all the rooms, is different from every perspective and surprises you constantly when walking through. The team enhanced this shape with sophisticated use of light, black details and pastels that contrast the pure white plastering. Most of the furnishing, including beds, mirrors, lamps, shelves and bathroom equipment, was custom-made in cooperation with local producers and craftsmen . The architects collaborated with Miroslav Bedná? from Prague’s shop Retroobjects in selecting turn-of-the-century modernist designs . Some parts of the hostel are also decorated by original works by Czech artist David Mina?ík. + Denisa Strmiskova Studio Via The Spaces Photos by Josef Kubicek

Go here to read the rest:
Long Story Short hostel is a modern escape tucked into a historical building in Moravia

Swytch is revolutionizing the e-bike conversion system

November 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Swytch is revolutionizing the e-bike conversion system

Wheels like the GeoOrbital and Copenhagen Wheel will turn your standard bike into an electric one, but their weight can make it impossible to pedal far in non-electric mode. That’s why we’re so into the new Swytch eBike conversion kit. Swytch puts the electronics and battery on your handlebar, leaving your wheel light and easy to pedal, even when you aren’t in e-bike mode. Electric wheel conversion kits are heavy because they have to carry the battery, motor and electronics all within in the wheel structure. That makes it difficult to pedal when you aren’t using the electric assist. But Swytch claims to eliminate that problem by putting the battery and electronics in a pack that attaches to your handlebars, leaving just the motor on the wheel. That makes it so you can leave the wheel on full-time and still use the bike in non- e-bike mode. The pack can also be mounted in a few seconds (after the initial installation), so you can switch back and forth as needed. More: Swap-in wheel converts any bike into an electric within 60 seconds The pack also includes a light to improve visibility, and riders can control the amount of electric assistance and check range using a control panel on the top of the pack. It also weighs in at a scant 8.6 pounds (10.6 if you choose the larger battery). That’s half of the weight of the electric wheels out there, which typically weigh around 20 pounds. It’s also more versatile, fitting on any size wheel. That means you can now electrify your Penny-farthing, Kickbike or recumbent bike. The small battery has a 25-mile range, while the larger one can take you 50 miles. If you want to snatch up a Swytch, they are running and Indiegogo campaign (which has already surpassed its goal). You can get a kit for $299 right now, over half off the retail price of $650. That’s cheaper than other wheels, which sit in the $1,000 – $1,500 range. + Swytch Indiegogo Via New Atlas

Here is the original post:
Swytch is revolutionizing the e-bike conversion system

Dutch farmhouse renovated as a vibrant meeting space with a hipped roof

January 30, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Dutch farmhouse renovated as a vibrant meeting space with a hipped roof

An extensive renovation turned this historic farmhouse in the Netherlands into a vibrant meeting place that sources its food from local farms. Architecture firm Eek en Dekkers kept many of the original design features of the 1904 building, accentuating its rustic quality yet offering a series of modern amenities. The farmhouse is located in the Friesian town of Woudsend in the Netherlands . Surrounded by farms and mills, the project retains the rustic qualities of the original structure dominated by handicrafts, hipped wooden roof and brick walls. The architects kept the existing roof structure, removed the mezzanine floor, and created a large atrium that shows off the beauty of the historic roof. Related: Mid-century Dutch farmhouse gets a bold contemporary makeover Currently functioning as a meeting place , the former farmhouse sources all its food locally– the milk and meat come from Frisian cows and the flour is sourced from the village mill. + Eek en Dekkers Via Archdaily Photos by Thomas Mayer

See the rest here: 
Dutch farmhouse renovated as a vibrant meeting space with a hipped roof

Dubuc Motors unveils Tomahawk electric sports car with a 370-mile range

January 30, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Dubuc Motors unveils Tomahawk electric sports car with a 370-mile range

Dubuc Motors just unveiled the Tomahawk – a 2+2 electric sports car that can go from 0-60 miles an hour in a zippy three seconds. Even more exciting, the car’s EPA-estimated range is a crazy 370 miles. The Tomahawk is manufactured entirely in North America, and the company reportedly spent 12 years researching and developing clean technology to create the green vehicle. Dubuc Motors ‘ Tomahawk feature sleek scissor doors, a panoramic roof, a built-in WiFi hotspot, hands-free voice commands, and a live 360 degree camera. The car is made of aluminum with a carbon fiber interior. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SFM2YCY3B0&feature=youtu.be Related: The Immortus electric sports car can drive all day using just the power of the sun Dubuc Motors sees themselves as fulfilling a niche market; on their crowdfunding campaign on StartEngine , they describe the Tomahawk as ” Tesla ‘s cousin” and explain, “While Tesla offers a sedan and an SUV, we want to complete their product line with our sports car.” With the electric vehicle (EV) market exploding – demand could exceed 35 million units around the world by 2022 – Dubuc Motors is angling to uniquely position themselves to fulfill demand for luxury EVs. Dubuc Motors has raised over $6 million in reservations . You can’t snag one of the cars quite yet, although you can reserve one for $5,000 on their website . There they offer six colors: green, black, two tone, red, yellow, and orange. The car’s retail price will be $125,000, and the company plans to begin production this year. + Dubuc Motors Images courtesy of Dubuc Motors

See the original post: 
Dubuc Motors unveils Tomahawk electric sports car with a 370-mile range

Twisting ribbons of plants transform a badly burned Maryland building into an interactive public artwork

October 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Twisting ribbons of plants transform a badly burned Maryland building into an interactive public artwork

https://vimeo.com/181187568 Located in Frederick’s downtown historic district, Sky Stage is a temporary artwork that uses vegetation and a digitally designed structure to breathe life into the damaged building . The organizers removed the plywood boards that formerly blocked public access to the historic stone building, which has no roof. Artist Heather Clark and MIT’s Digital Structures research group used computer algorithms to engineer a complex two-story-tall wooden lattice that forms the structural base for twisting ribbons covered in drought-resistant plantings. State-of-the-art green roof technology was used to create the spiraling vegetated bands that weave through the building’s open doors and windows. Related: Floating bridge transforms a crumbling historic Boston bridge into a moving event space A timber seating area was constructed next to the two-story structure to form an open-air theatre that accommodates 140 people. Trees integrated into the wooden benches soften the stone background and provide relief from the sun. Rainwater collected from an adjacent roof is stored in a cistern and reused to irrigate the plants and trees. The Frederick Arts Council and AmeriCorps will oversee the day-to-day operations of the theater as well as future creative endeavors for the public including plays, music acts, children’s story time, art classes, dance, history, literature, and film. The Sky Stage will be open through July 2017. + Sky Stage Images via Heather Clark

Read the original here:
Twisting ribbons of plants transform a badly burned Maryland building into an interactive public artwork

7 agricultural innovations that could save the world

October 20, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 7 agricultural innovations that could save the world

1. Algorithmic Agriculture Algorithms are everywhere these days. They can refine our web searches and help us decide what show we should binge on next or controversially used to determine who is most likely to become a criminal . Algorithms can also be harnessed to more effectively plant a field with diverse crops. UK-based designer  Benedikt Groß  has created algorithmic models that enable him to plant various crops in complex patterns in a field. This improves ecological resilience and diversity through fascinating patterns that are best appreciated from above.  2. Permaculture and Food Forests Permaculture is a broad system of design principles that seeks to simulate and utilize patterns that can be observed in nature. Its name is derived from its overarching goal of a permanent agriculture system, one that relies on perennial plants and does not require the intensive tilling This system of design is evident in the food forest, a model of agriculture that mimics the multi-layered structure of a forest environment. Ground cover plants that provide food and nutrient enrichment are paired with low-laying bushes and small trees while large trees and vines tower above. Food forests are popping up from  Boston  to  Seattle . These unique green spaces provide food, habitat and a place for the community to gather. 3. Stacking Functions with the Ring Garden Well-designed fields planted with a variety of crops serve several functions: food production, wildlife habitat, air quality improvement, carbon absorption, and more. This is referred to as “stacking functions” in permaculture circles. One of the most promising examples of this principle is the solar-powered Ring Garden . Though the Ring Garden is still only in its conceptual stage, its elegant combination of desalinization, solar energy, and food production is worth exploring, particularly for drought-stricken coastal communities like California. When fully operational, the rotating structure is projected to annually produce 16 million gallons of clean water, 40,000 pounds of crops grown without soil, and 11,000 pounds of biomass for livestock feed. 4. Harvesting and Harnessing Rainwater Rainwater is a precious resource that communities and individuals too often fail to effectively capture and use to meet their needs. Rain barrels can be installed on a small or large scale to capture rainwater for later use in growing or brewing . Incorporating living mulch can help improve soil fertility and increase the amount of rainwater that is stored and retained in the ground. Swales, a key structure in permaculture design, incorporates small mounds to slow the flow of rainwater downhill and capture it for plants to absorb. 5. Farming with Fungus Fungus sometimes feels like the forgotten kingdom of life, a misunderstood, often feared group of organisms without which our global ecosystem could not exist. The most iconic manifestations of fungi, mushrooms may be used to fight cancer, treat depression, or to cook a delicious meal . However, mushrooms are merely the fruiting body of a vast fungal organism, most of which exists below ground in the form of mycelium, the white stringy fungal network that plays a key role in ecological health. Scientists have infused these mycelial networks into the roots of plants, which allows them to endure extreme drought that otherwise would destroy them. Mycologist Paul Stamets has incorporated helpful fungus into a cow pasture, in which harmful bacteria from waste is absorbed and purified by the fungus before it reaches a water source. Stamets has also developed a patent  for a fungal pesticide that destroys pests without the use of harmful chemicals. 6. Gardening with Children To be nourished tomorrow, we must plant seeds today. The young people who will inherit a world threatened by climate change and ecological devastation are learning to appreciate and protect the natural world by planting seeds of their own. Gardening with children in schools, communities, and homes across the United States has surged in popularity in recent years, buoyed by First Lady Michelle Obama’s focus on gardening and nutrition. FoodCorps , a national service organization founded in 2009 whose mission is to connect children to real food, now serves dozens of organizations in seventeen states, plus DC. On a local level, organizations such as CitySprouts , the Food Project  and  Edible Schoolyard  connect schools and students to the wonders of learning by growing. 7. Rooftop Growing In urban environments where space is limited, growing in underutilized spaces such as rooftops can contribute to a more resilient local food system. In Chicago, the world’s largest rooftop farm  on the Methods Products manufacturing plant is powered by 100% renewable energy, provides jobs to local residents, and produces millions of pounds of pesticide-free, locally sourced vegetables each year. Also in Chicago, growers at Omni Ecosystems are pushing the boundaries of urban agriculture by growing rooftop wheat that is processed and utilized by local bakers. Homeless shelters in Atlanta  and hospitals in Indianapolis  are also enhanced by the beauty and production of rooftop farms. Lead image via Pixabay , others via  Benedikt Groß , Boston Food Forest Coalition ,  Alexandru Predonu , Nicholas Lannuzel , Kalle Gustafsson , FoodCorps , and Omni Ecosystems.

See the original post: 
7 agricultural innovations that could save the world

Perkins+Will Revitalizes SF’s Iconic 140 New Montgomery into a LEED Gold Office Tower

April 23, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Perkins+Will Revitalizes SF’s Iconic 140 New Montgomery into a LEED Gold Office Tower

Read the rest of Perkins+Will Revitalizes SF’s Iconic 140 New Montgomery into a LEED Gold Office Tower Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , 140 new montgomery , 140nm , adaptive reuse , eco design , eco office , eco office tower , eco skyscraper , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green renovation , historic building , historic renovation , office tower , perkins + will , perkins and will , San Francisco , Sustainable Building , sustainable design

See the original post here: 
Perkins+Will Revitalizes SF’s Iconic 140 New Montgomery into a LEED Gold Office Tower

RARE Architecture Restores Historic London Building with a Modern Patterned Skin

February 21, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on RARE Architecture Restores Historic London Building with a Modern Patterned Skin

Read the rest of RARE Architecture Restores Historic London Building with a Modern Patterned Skin Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: aluminum skin , Bethnal Green Town Hall , green renovation , historic building , hotel , London , luxury , parametric , Rare architecture , sustainable renovation , Tower hall hotel        

Go here to see the original: 
RARE Architecture Restores Historic London Building with a Modern Patterned Skin

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1472 access attempts in the last 7 days.