Chilling light installation visualizes sea level rise caused by climate change

March 22, 2019 by  
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Ghostly white bands of light are illuminating the coastline in the Outer Hebrides to show the potential rise in sea levels that could become reality as a result of unchecked climate change . The collaborative and site-specific art piece, named Lines (57° 59 ?N, 7° 16 ?W), is the work of Finnish artists Pekka Niittyvirta and Timo Aho . The environmental art installation is embedded with sensors that measure the rising tidal changes and activate three synchronized light lines during times of high tide. Hoping to draw attention to and spark a dialogue about climate change, artists Pekka Niittyvirta and Timo Aho wanted to render visible the predicted impacts of rising sea levels in an area they believe will be among the hardest hit. Consequently, the artists chose the Uist, a low-lying island archipelago belonging to the Outer Hebrides island chain located off the west coast of mainland Scotland. The artwork has been installed at the Taigh Chearsabhagh Museum and Arts Centre in Lochmaddy, the main port of entry to North Uist, which the artists said “cannot develop on its existing site due to predicted storm surge sea levels.” Lines (57° 59 ?N, 7° 16 ?W) consists of bright white LED lights, float switches/sensors and timers. Two light lines wrap around the sides of a pair of gabled buildings while the third light line appears to hover above an empty field. The three lines light up in sync with the rising tide. Related: Climate change art illustrates sea level rise in Venice during COP 23 “The installation explores the catastrophic impact of our relationship with nature and its long term effects,” the artists said in their project statement. “The work provokes a dialogue on how the rising sea levels will affect coastal areas, its inhabitants and land usage in the future. The work helps us to imagine the future sea level rise in undefined period of time, depending on our actions toward the climate warming.” Installed May 8, 2018, Lines will run until May 1, 2019. + Pekka Niittyvirta + Timo Aho Images via Pekka Niittyvirta

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Chilling light installation visualizes sea level rise caused by climate change

Europes first underwater restaurant opens its doors in Norway

March 22, 2019 by  
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Europe’s first underwater restaurant, “ Under ,” has just welcomed its first guests to an extraordinary Snøhetta -designed environment that embraces stunning seabed views. Located at the southernmost point of the coastline in Lindesnes, Norway, Under is a partly submerged building that rests directly on the seabed 16.4 feet below water. The monolithic building also serves as a research center for marine life, and its rough concrete envelope will, over time, become a habitat for an artificial reef. Famed for its intense and mercurial weather, Lindesnes is often home to sea-churning storms. In contrast, Under is a warm and calming environment fitted with locally harvested Norwegian oak finishes and sound-absorbing textiles. Tilted into the water like a sunken ship, the 111.5-foot-long building receives guests via a staircase that leads to the seabed. The colors of the textile-clad interiors become darker — changing from sunset pinks to intense coral to sea green and finally midnight blue — as guests move closer to the 40-person dining room. The materials also change from rougher wood finishes at the entrance into increasingly refined finishes in the dining room. In the dining room, a massive, 36-foot-wide window provides panoramic sea views, which change throughout the seasons from sapphire blues in winter to emerald greens in summer. To minimize reflections on the glass, the restaurant has installed a sophisticated lighting system with 380 LED lamps that can be adjusted to respond to differing light conditions. Views can also be enjoyed from the vertical window cut into the side of the building that begins at the mezzanine level where the building meets the sea and extends down toward the seabed. Related: Peek inside the BIG-designed garden village for one of the world’s best restaurants “Lying against the craggy shoreline, the structure’s half-meter-thick concrete walls are built to withstand pressure and shock from the rugged sea conditions,” Snøhetta said. “Like a sunken periscope, the restaurant’s massive window offers a view of the seabed as it changes throughout the seasons and varying weather conditions.” The fine dining restaurant will be led by Head Chef Nicolai Ellitsgaard, who will serve high-quality, locally sourced produce with an emphasis on sustainably harvested wildlife . + Snøhetta Photography by IVAR KVAAL and Inger Marie Grini/Bo Bedre Norge via Snøhetta

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Europes first underwater restaurant opens its doors in Norway

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