Episode 263: Simulating transformation, investing in underserved communities

April 9, 2021 by  
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Episode 263: Simulating transformation, investing in underserved communities Heather Clancy Fri, 04/09/2021 – 01:30 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:05). An open letter to CPG companies on recycling Food companies must be healthy and sustainable, not one or the other From pioneers to fast-followers: Circular metrics are for the masses Features Learning through simulation (16:30) Last spring, GreenBiz teamed up with leadership development firm WholeWorks on the ” Leading the Sustainability Transformation ” professional certificate program, organized as a simulation exercise. GreenBiz Senior Vice President and Senior Analyst John Davies drops by with a progress report. Making community investments count (25:20) Catherine Berman is CEO of CNote , a woman-owned, woman-led organization focused on helping institutions invest in underserved communities. She offers insight into the model.  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “Curiosity,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Here’s the Thing,” “Arcade Montage” and “Southside” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Social Justice Public-Private Partnerships Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 34:51 Sponsored Article Off

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Episode 263: Simulating transformation, investing in underserved communities

The Road to Powering Amazon on 100% Renewable Energy by 2025

March 31, 2021 by  
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The Road to Powering Amazon on 100% Renewable Energy by 2025 Date/Time: April 29, 2021 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT) Amazon has been investing in sustainability for many years. Back in 2014, Amazon started making major investments in renewable energy. Most recently the company committed to powering global operations on 100% renewable energy by 2025 as part of The Climate Pledge, a commitment to be net-zero carbon by 2040, 10 years ahead of the Paris Agreement. How will the company get there five years ahead of the initial 2030 target? How does a company like Amazon with operations worldwide navigate policies in global markets? How is the company thinking about buying renewable energy and turning on projects during a pandemic? Join us for a panel with Amazon’s team of experts and partners to uncover how you can apply these learnings to your business and sustainability strategy. Moderator: Heather Clancy, Editorial Director, GreenBiz Group Speakers: Chris Roe, Renewable Energy & Sustainable Operations Lead, Amazon Daniela Fitzpatrick, Energy Procurement Manager, Amazon Web Services Miranda Ballentine, CEO, Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance (REBA) Alana Kühne, Head of CE PPAs & Merchant Products, Ørsted If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. taylor flores Wed, 03/31/2021 – 11:12 Heather Clancy Editorial Director GreenBiz Group @GreenTechLady Chris Roe Renewable Energy & Sustainable Operations Lead Amazon Daniela Fitzpatrick Energy Procurement Manager Amazon Web Services Miranda Ballentine CEO Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance (REBA) @renewablebuyers Alana Kühne Head of CE PPAs & Merchant Products Ørsted gbz_webcast_date Thu, 04/29/2021 – 10:00 – Thu, 04/29/2021 – 11:00

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The Road to Powering Amazon on 100% Renewable Energy by 2025

Episode 260: Disclosure dialogue, your employees want purpose

March 19, 2021 by  
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Episode 260: Disclosure dialogue, your employees want purpose Heather Clancy Fri, 03/19/2021 – 00:15 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (3:50). The SEC’s change of climate on climate change and ESG Car companies are now battery companies Who wants to be a climate-tech billionaire? Features Whither sustainability reporting standards? (23:45) The International Financial Reporting Standards Foundation is moving forward with a plan to set up a board that would establish international standards for sustainability reporting. Janine Guillot, chief executive of the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board, chats about the implications for corporate disclosures. A test of workforce resilience (34:10) Susan Hunt Stevens, chief executive of WeSpire, discusses findings of the advisory firm’s 10th annual survey on employee engagement. The biggest surprise? Respondents suggest there has been a decrease in access to diversity, equity and inclusion programs over the past year. What gives?  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “Here’s the Thing,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Curiosity,” “And So Then” and “4th Ave Walkup” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Topics Podcast Finance & Investing Careers Employee Engagement Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 49:28 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 260: Disclosure dialogue, your employees want purpose

Episode 258: Hacking climate solutions, finding ‘good work’

March 5, 2021 by  
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Episode 258: Hacking climate solutions, finding ‘good work’ Heather Clancy Fri, 03/05/2021 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:05). A just energy transition in action: Developing 1G of wind power with tribes The role of time horizons and relationship banking in financing a net-zero economy The coming net-zero backlash Features Hacking the climate crisis (21:10) Sanjana Paul , a 23-year-old scientist, electrical engineer and environmental activist, is executive director of EarthHacks, a hackathon that encourages college students to surface solutions for combating climate change. She talks about her mission with Shana Rappaport, GreenBiz vice president and executive director of the VERGE conference series.  Is your job meaningful? (32:40) Career coach and long-time GreenBiz columnist Shannon Houde chats with Associate Editor Deonna Anderson about her new book, ” Good Work: How to Build a Career That Makes A Difference in the World .” *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “As I Was Saying,” “Sad Marimba Planet,” “Southside” and “More On That Later” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Topics Podcast Social Justice Renewable Energy Careers Net-Zero Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 51:41 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 258: Hacking climate solutions, finding ‘good work’

5 opportunities of a circular economy

March 5, 2021 by  
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5 opportunities of a circular economy David McGinty Fri, 03/05/2021 – 00:12 More than 100 billion tons of resources enter the economy every year — everything from metals, minerals and fossil fuels to organic materials from plants and animals. Just 8.6 percent gets recycled and used again. Use of resources has tripled (automatic PDF download) since 1970 and could double again by 2050 if business continues as usual. We would need 1.5 Earths to sustainably support our current resource use. This rampant consumption has devastating effects for humans, wildlife and the planet. It is more urgent than ever to shift from linear, use-it-up-and-throw-it-away models to a circular economy: where waste and pollution are designed out, products and materials are kept in use for longer, and natural systems can regenerate. A circular economy isn’t just about fixing environmental wrongs, though: Evidence shows it can bring big opportunities and positive impacts across industries, sectors and lives. A growing number of businesses, governments and civil society organizations are coming together to drive the change through the Platform for Accelerating the Circular Economy (PACE) . More than 200 experts from 100 organizations helped develop the Circular Economy Action Agenda , a set of publications that analyze the potential impact and call for action across five key sectors: plastics, textiles, electronics, food and capital equipment (machinery and large tools such as medical scanners, agricultural equipment and manufacturing infrastructure). The Action Agenda demonstrates five opportunities associated with the shift to a circular economy: 1. Make better use of finite resources The circular economy concept is all about making better use of natural resources such as forests, soil, water, air, metals and minerals. Take the textiles industry. Each year, huge quantities of fossil fuels are used to produce clothes from synthetic fibers each year. Textile production (including cotton farming) uses almost 100 billion cubic meters of water per year, about 4 percent of global freshwater withdrawal. At the same time, people throw away still-wearable clothes worth an estimated $460 billion each year. Creating a circular economy for textiles means shifting to recycled and recyclable materials in order to reduce the amount of land, water and fossil fuels used to produce new clothes. It means changing consumption patterns to reduce new purchases and keep clothes in use for longer, for instance by developing the second-hand and rental markets as well as changing the culture of fast fashion. Research suggests that the purchase of 100 second-hand garments can displace the production of 85 new garments. And finally, it means ensuring that clothes at the end of their life are collected and recycled or repurposed into new clothes, further reducing resource use. 2. Reduce emissions About 45 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions come from product use and manufacturing, as well as food production. Circular economy strategies that reduce our use of resources can cut global greenhouse gas emissions by 39 percent (22.8 billion tons) and play a crucial role in averting the dangerous impacts of climate change. For example, shifting towards recycled materials would alleviate the need to produce virgin plastics and synthetic fibers, which would significantly reduce fossil fuel use and associated emissions. Changing consumption patterns is also crucial: For example, if the average number of times a garment is worn were doubled, greenhouse gas emissions from the textiles industry would be 44 percent lower. The world produces around 300 million tons of plastic waste every year, nearly equivalent to the weight of the entire human population. Creating a circular economy for food by reducing loss and waste is particularly crucial to lowering emissions: If food loss and waste were a country, it would be the third-largest emitter after the United States and China. 3. Protect human health and biodiversity Every year, more than 9 million deaths occur due to air, water and soil pollution. This pollution also threatens biodiversity . Working towards a circular economy helps protect human health and biodiversity in many ways, including by making better use of natural resources (protecting water and land), and by mitigating the climate crisis. One of the clearest and most direct impacts of the shift to a circular economy will come from how we deal with products at the end of their life. The world produces around 300 million tons of plastic waste every year, nearly equivalent to the weight of the entire human population. This is on top of 54 million tons of electronic waste (e-waste), of which just 17.4 percent gets collected and recycled. This waste becomes hazardous for human health and for biodiversity when it is mismanaged, either leaking into the natural environment or disposed of through open burning, landfills or substandard recycling. Designing products to be kept in use for longer reduces the amount of waste produced. Creating proper collection and processing systems protects workers and the environment from hazardous materials. For instance, using existing solutions such as replacing plastic other materials, designing plastics so that they can be more easily recycled and scaling up collection and recycling could reduce the flow of plastic waste into the ocean by 80 percent in 20 years — a shift that would be enormously beneficial for human health and biodiversity. 4. Boost economies Research shows that the circular economy offers a $4.5 trillion economic opportunity by reducing waste, stimulating innovation and creating employment. New business models focused on reuse, repair, remanufacturing and sharing models offer significant innovation opportunities. For example, a circular economy for plastics offers considerable economic benefits. Less plastic waste in the ocean would benefit industries such as fishing and tourism, as plastic pollution leads to $13 billion in costs and economic losses per year. Reducing the pollution and toxic emissions that come from the open burning of plastic waste would lower healthcare costs, while reducing fossil fuel use for plastic production would help mitigate climate change and its associated costs. Many of these economic benefits and opportunities are long-term, indirect and require significant investment; a long-term view is key, as are short-term incentives to drive the change. This can include policies that create more immediate financial incentives for businesses to develop innovative new business models and enable the efficient flow of reused and recycled materials across global value chains. 5. Create more and better jobs Transitioning to a circular economy could create a net increase of 6 million jobs by 2030 . Making the most of this opportunity will require a clear focus on social and environmental justice. Jobs may be lost in more linear businesses; however, new jobs will be created in fields such as recycling, services such as repair and rental, or in new enterprises that spring up to make innovative use of secondary materials. These new jobs cannot be considered direct replacements, as they may be in different locations and require different skills. For instance, we must consider the millions of garment workers — mostly women — whose employment depends on the continuation of the fast fashion industry. Investing in a just transition via social dialogue, social protection and reskilling programs is key. While a net increase in jobs is important, another value-add of circularity is the opportunity to provide formal work and improved working conditions for informal laborers. Around 15 million people worldwide work as “waste pickers,” salvaging reusable or recyclable materials from garbage. Bringing these informal waste pickers into formal work in collection or recycling is a major opportunity to offer safer, more secure employment. Maximizing the impact of the circular economy Of course, there are always trade-offs to be considered and managed when working towards large-scale, systemic change. For example, shifting to bio-based plastics and natural, recyclable textiles such as cotton will use less fossil fuels than traditional plastics or synthetic fibers, but may increase demands for land and water to grow such materials. Shifting to natural materials is a crucial part of the solution, but only if those materials are produced in a sustainable way — and only if consumption habits change, too. A long-term view is key, as are short-term incentives to drive the change. It’s also important to recognize the interconnected nature of the global economy. Many minerals and metals used in electronics are byproducts from the mining of aluminum, copper, lead and zinc, which are used across industries. Going circular in the electronics industry alone would not do much to reduce dependence on these resources. Multiple industries must shift to create systemic change. Finally, it will be crucial to keep social well-being and equity top-of-mind. For example, moving to a circular economy can shift investment and employment away from production and manufacturing (which tends to happen in lower-income countries) and towards later stages of the value chain, such as repair, resale, sorting and recycling (often concentrated in wealthier countries). We’ll need to ensure that economic benefits are equitably distributed to maximize the opportunity of a circular economy. A role for everyone The above five impact areas exhibit some of the social, environmental and economic benefits of a circular economy, but realizing these benefits will require ambitious action. Governments, businesses, civil society, finance institutions, research organizations — everyone has a role to play. The new Circular Economy Action Agenda is a good place to start. Pull Quote The world produces around 300 million tons of plastic waste every year, nearly equivalent to the weight of the entire human population. A long-term view is key, as are short-term incentives to drive the change. Topics Circular Economy WRI Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Treating finite resources wisely is part of the picture. Shutterstock Hyper Story Close Authorship

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5 opportunities of a circular economy

Episode 257: Happy Birthday, Bill McDonough; career advice for sustainability pros

February 26, 2021 by  
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Episode 257: Happy Birthday, Bill McDonough; career advice for sustainability pros Heather Clancy Fri, 02/26/2021 – 05:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (1:50). Nestlé and Microsoft on financing circular innovations What China can teach the US about EV fast-charging rollouts Bill McDonough at 70: A look back … and ahead  (featuring interview highlights at 10:40) Features Navigating a successful sustainability career (24:55) How can CSOs shape business resilience? GreenBiz Vice President and Senior Analyst John Davies chats with the authors of a new report from management consulting firm Korn Ferry, ” The Rise of the Chief Sustainability Officer .” Tune in for insights from Korn Ferry experts Raj Chopra, senior principal, and Andrew Lowe, senior client partner. Digging into the debate over soil carbon credits (36:45) The carbon-reduction promises related to regenerative agriculture loom large, and the debate over the value of offsets related to this sequestration is just getting started. GreenBiz Carbon and Food Analyst drops by for a conversation about the divide between “Young Turks” like Nori and CIBO, and “The Establishment” represented by the Ecosystem Services Market Consortium. *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “As I Was Saying,” “Introducing the Pre-roll,” “Thinking It Over” and “Knowing the Truth” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Topics Podcast Circular Economy Careers Food & Agriculture Carbon Removal Regenerative Agriculture Carbon Removal Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 46:48 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 257: Happy Birthday, Bill McDonough; career advice for sustainability pros

This wallet can tell you about its carbon impact

February 18, 2021 by  
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This wallet can tell you about its carbon impact Heather Clancy Thu, 02/18/2021 – 01:00 For more essays by Heather Clancy, sign up for VERGE Weekly , one of our free newsletters. In early January, I covered personal care products company Aveda’s project to trace and verify the provenance of its vanilla supply using blockchain — and to allow consumers to peek into that information by later this year. It’s not the only consumer brand dreaming about that sort of connection or looking to digital technology as the answer.  Fashion brand Covalent, created to showcase the potential of a biomaterial called AirCarbon made by biotech firm Newlight Technologies, has started communicating with its customers in a similar way. It’s using blockchain software from IBM to track and disclose carbon impact data related to the production of its products, marketed as carbon-negative. Covalent’s metric is called Carbon Date, a 12-digit number stamped on the roughly three dozen SKUs in its product catalog — items ranging from wallets to clutches to smartphone sleeves to tote bags. Consumers can see the data by visiting the Covalent website and entering their unique code. (The test drive at the link shows you the sort of information that is shared.) The Carbon Date is verified with footprint information from carbon accounting firm Carbon Trust, which created a cradle-to-cradle analysis of AirCarbon after an assessment in 2020.  Newlight CEO Mark Herrema told me his company created the Carbon Date concept to appeal to consumers seeking to dig deeper into the environmental claims being made by consumer products brands. “We had this epiphany that GHG emissions seem like such a vague issue … It was about turning this into something tangible,” he says. The material used to create the products, AirCarbon, is made through a renewable energy-powered anaerobic production process in which microorganisms digest air, saltwater and captured greenhouse gases to create a bioderived polymer. According to Newlight, for every one kilogram of AirCarbon produced in this manner, 88 kilograms of CO2 equivalent are sequestered. Hence, Covalent’s ability to make a carbon-negative claim.  Right now, this is a pretty niche brand: The only place you can buy the Covalent items is on the company’s e-commerce site, and at $480 for a tote bag, they’re obviously not meant for the average consumer.  But Debbie Kestin-Schildkraut, marketing and alliances lead for IBM AI applications and the tech firm’s global blockchain ecosystem, says the importance of proving environmental claims is growing. “We are seeing in every study that we do that more and more consumers are willing to change their shopping habits … Blockchain can help build involvement,” she said. IBM’s blockchain technology is being used in some pretty compelling ways, including to track scallop fishing and offer a premium price to certain boats that fish more sustainably than others; and for food safety applications, such as the ones being deployed by Walmart . Recycler Plastic Bank is also using IBM blockchain services to verify its claims . (The same integrator that wrote that application helped Covalent with the Carbon Date project.) To be clear, the life-cycle analysis used for the Carbon Data calculation includes just raw material extraction, transport of raw materials and manufacturing. It doesn’t include the e-commerce cycle, nor does it include end-of-life considerations that are part of circular economy assessments. AirCarbon is billed a “natural, biologically degradable material” similar to wood. If it winds up in the ocean, it can be eaten by microorganisms — much like a banana peel, according to the company’s FAQ. Is this all a publicity stunt? The skeptic in me says yes but I love the creativity and you can’t argue with the need for transparency initiatives that include the consumer. In this way, the Carbon Date initiative echoes similar moves to label food with their carbon impact that have been embraced by the likes of Unilever, Chipotle and Panera Breads. The challenge will be finding an approach that doesn’t require a translation guide for every single consumer production category. Topics Carbon Removal Consumer Products Zero Emissions Blockchain Featured Column Practical Magic Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Every Covalent product comes with a Carbon Date to help educate consumers about the impact of its production. Courtesy of Covalent

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This wallet can tell you about its carbon impact

The ‘last mile’ of consumer sustainability behavior

February 18, 2021 by  
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The ‘last mile’ of consumer sustainability behavior Mike De Socio Thu, 02/18/2021 – 00:05 These days, it’s hard to argue that sustainability is a niche consumer interest. A vast majority of consumers worldwide believe we need to consume less, according to research by GlobeScan . More to the point, 57 percent of consumers in that survey were willing to pay more for sustainable products. But only about a quarter of them actually made any sustainable changes to their lifestyle or consumption. So what gives? “There’s this really marked intention-action gap when we’re asking people to change their behaviors to be more sustainable,” said Katherine White, professor of marketing and behavioral science at the University of British Columbia. White shared her research on sustainable consumption during GreenBiz 21. She was among industry leaders from Amazon and Procter & Gamble, as well as nonprofit executives, who shared insights on the trends in sustainable consumption. Here are three takeaways from the session: 1. Attitude has shifted, but behavior lags Across the board, indicators for consumer interest in sustainable products are up, according to the GlobeScan survey. The 2020 results, for example, showed that 73 percent of consumers wanted to reduce the impact they have on the environment by a large amount, up almost 10 percentage points from the year prior. During the session, Chris Coulter, CEO of GlobeScan, described it as a “remarkable shift” in consumer attitude that bodes well for the sustainable products market. But he was quick to underline the shortcomings of that progress. “There is still a gap between our desire to change and what we’re actually doing, but we do see significant movements happening across the world,” he said. White’s research in behavioral science looks into what levers could be most effective in convincing consumers to align their choices with their concern for the planet.  A fundamental truth for sustainable products: Consumers’ top concerns are still performance and price. “This is a real challenge for marketers, for organizations, for public policymakers,” she said. “We really need to understand, what are the key drivers of behavior change in particular?” White identified a few factors that stakeholders can focus on to shift behavior — social influence (in other words, peer pressure), habit formation, individual values, emotional buy-in and tangible outcomes.  But ultimately, no one should think about hitting consumers with all of those efforts at once, White said. The shifts are more likely to be gradual. 2. Price and performance are still king Todd Cline, as director for Procter & Gamble’s North America fabric care research and development, is trying to focus consumers on one tiny change that could drastically slash the climate impact of his company’s product: Wash their clothes in cold water. Cline said what consumers do with Tide, one of the company’s sub-brands, once they take it off the shelf accounts for two-thirds of the product’s carbon footprint. The biggest chunk of that is the energy used to heat the water in the washing machine. But Cline knows if he wants consumers to change to cold, the performance can’t suffer. So his plan is simple: “Make products that work great when consumers use them on cold,” he said. This highlights a fundamental truth for sustainable products: Consumers’ top concerns are still performance and price. So sustainable products must tick those two boxes before showing off their climate bona fides.  Adam Werbach, global lead for sustainable shopping at Amazon, knows this well. He led the development of a “Climate Pledge Friendly” label on the site that uses external certifications to direct customers to the most sustainable products. The experience so far has shown Werbach that customers, even at Amazon’s eco-conscious Whole Foods, primarily seek out price and performance before considering sustainability.  But the “Climate Pledge Friendly” label can be a quick, easy way for them to make that decision. “Customers like the cognitive load being taken off them,” he said. 3. Less (information) can be more The success of a simple label for Amazon speaks to another important tactic for nudging customers to more sustainable options: Sometimes less information is better. The average consumer, according to White, doesn’t have the time or interest to know all the details on ingredients, manufacturing or packaging. They just want to know it’s not going to harm the planet. “At the end of the day, if it’s really quick and easy and enjoyable and pleasant, I’m going to do it,” White said. That’s where labels can help. Doug Gatlin, CEO of Green Seal, said his company has worked to simplify the way it communicates its own sustainability certifications. “It can really be difficult to communicate the various attributes to the consumer,” he said. So rather than listing 20 or more claims on one label, Green Seal developed a “compass” that identifies four main categories — water, waste, health and climate — and acts as a shorthand to evaluate products. Cline keeps this in mind, too, as Procter & Gamble refines its own packaging and labeling. “If we can make it simple and make it so it’s a great experience for people, they’ll adopt the behavior and stick with it,” he said. Pull Quote A fundamental truth for sustainable products: Consumers’ top concerns are still performance and price. Topics Consumer Trends GreenBiz 21 Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Consumer trend surveys show a shift towards an environmental mindset among shoppers but they need to start putting their money where their mouth is.//Image courtesy of Unsplash 

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Episode 255: Reflections and highlights from GreenBiz 21

February 12, 2021 by  
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Episode 255: Reflections and highlights from GreenBiz 21 Heather Clancy Fri, 02/12/2021 – 00:15 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:00). The Wild West of plastic credits and offsets 9 key takeaways from the 600-page Dasgupta Review on the Economics of Biodiversity How climate change can be addressed through executive compensation Features GreenBiz 21 highlights (18:00) Enjoy some highlights from the rich keynote program at this week’s GreenBiz 21 event .  Sanda Ojiambo, executive director and CEO, United Nations Global Compact Sherri Mitchell Weh’na Ha’mu Kwasset, Indigenous rights attorney and executive director of the Land Peace Foundation Tara Houska (Couchiching First Nation), attorney, environmental and Indigenous rights advocate Learning from a young Indigenous activist and educator (30:15) VERGE Executive Director Shana Rappaport chats with 20-year-old Indigenous educator Danielle Boyer, founder of the STEAM Connection. Boyer was a featured speaker at this week’s GreenBiz 21. Her cause: Ensuring young people of color have access to an education in science, technology, engineering, art and math. Read the Q&A here . Is it just? A label helps answer that question (37:30) “Social justice is really the new frontier of transparency,” says Rochelle Routman, chief sustainability and quality officer of HMTX Industries, one company embracing the Just Label designation developed by the International Living Future Institute (ILFI). This segment features Routman, along with ILFI Director of Business Development Shawn Hesse. Read more about the process here . *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “Here’s the Thing,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Looking Back,” “Arcade Montage” and “Knowing the Truth” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Topics Podcast GreenBiz 21 Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 42:53 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Building Back Better After Wildfire

February 6, 2021 by  
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Building Back Better After Wildfire Date/Time: March 9, 2021 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT) In 2020, the western U.S. suffered its most devastating wildfire season to date — one that experts fear could be the new normal. What can corporations and others do to help grow back millions of acres of trees and prevent losing them to the ravages of climate change? How society and the business world goes about restoring our burned landscapes could make all the difference in whether new forests last. That’s why American Forests and partners like Salesforce are pioneering climate-informed strategies to create resilient forests that will provide health, economic and climate benefits for years to come.  In this one-hour webcast, participants will learn: Why 2021 is an opportune time to reforest America How corporations can use their resources and influence to help reforest in a climate-smart way Why supporting reforestation designed for the future helps grow back forests for the long term, creates jobs and helps sequester and store carbon Moderator: Heather Clancy, Editorial Director, GreenBiz Group Speakers: Brittany Dyer, California State Director, American Forests Luis Vidal, Sierra Corps Forestry Fellow Max Scher, Head of Clean Energy and Carbon Programs, Salesforce If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. taylor flores Sat, 02/06/2021 – 10:08 Heather Clancy Editorial Director GreenBiz Group @GreenTechLady Brittany Dyer California State Director American Forests @DyerDialogue Luis Vidal Forestry Fellow Sierra Corps Max Scher Head of Clean Energy and Carbon Programs Salesforce @MindScher gbz_webcast_date Tue, 03/09/2021 – 10:00 – Tue, 03/09/2021 – 11:00

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Building Back Better After Wildfire

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