The best sources for plant-based protein

February 4, 2020 by  
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Many researchers and doctors around the world agree that a plant-based diet provides many benefits. It is credited with lowering inflammation in the body and disease prevention. But many people are concerned that a plant-based diet does not provide enough protein, an essential nutrient responsible for fueling the body and a critical component in building body tissue. Unfortunately, a long marketing campaign sending the message that meat is the primary source of protein has led to a lot of misinformation about the quantity of protein found in plants. If you are looking for ways to bring more plant-based foods onto your plate, here are 10 excellent sources of plant-based protein. Please note that the minimum recommended amount of protein for a sedentary lifestyle is 56 grams for men and 46 grams for women, but this amount increases with factors including activity level, general health and age. Talk to your doctor to learn more about how much protein your body needs. Related: 10 vegan sources of protein you can grow at home Seeds Although seeds are small, they pack a punch when it comes to providing protein. Adding some chia or flax seeds to your fruit smoothie will keep you feeling full for longer. Tossing sesame seeds into your vegetable stir-fry or snacking on sunflower seeds is another easy way to up your protein consumption. One cup of pumpkin seeds provides 12 grams of protein. A couple of tablespoons of hemp seeds contain 11 grams, and even those teeny-tiny poppy seeds add 2 grams in just over a tablespoon. Quinoa Although typically cooked like a grain, quinoa is actually a member of the spinach, chard and beet family. The frequent debate about whether it is a vegetable or a grain is somewhat satisfied with the label of pseudocereal, which means it’s not part of the grass family. Whatever you choose to call it, quinoa is a versatile and protein-packed food with over 8 grams per cooked cup. Lentils Once you get the hang of cooking lentils, you’ll find them to be an essential addition to or centerpiece of your diet. They are versatile and tasty. Plus, one cup of lentils provides more than 1/3 of the minimum recommended daily amount of protein at around 18 grams. Beans Beans rank nearly as high as lentils on the protein scale, and there are myriad options to match any taste profile. Daily value (DV) amounts for one cup look like this: white beans (35%), split peas (33%), pinto beans (31%), kidney beans (31%), black beans (30%), navy beans (30%), chickpeas (29%) and lima beans (29%). Nuts Nuts are a great snack, and they provide both protein and healthy fats. But they also make a nice addition to many recipes . Pick your favorites and experiment. For example, peanuts, almonds and pistachios contain 12 to 14 grams of protein per 1/2 cup. Nut butters are another option for adding protein to your diet. Watch for added salt and sugar when choosing your peanut butter, almond butter or cashew butter. Two tablespoons is considered a serving size of these nut butters. Soybean products There are a variety of products sourced from soybeans. Edamame contains about 8 to 9 grams of protein per 1/2 cup and can be eaten boiled or shelled. Tofu has long been associated with vegan and vegetarian diets as a protein replacement for good reason. It contains around 10 grams of protein per 1/2 cup, and tofu can be added to just about anything, from soup to salads to sandwiches. Tempeh is another soybean-based food that brings 31 grams of protein per cup. Related: How to choose the healthiest, most sustainable milk alternative Peas Vegetables should be a priority in any diet. While most offer some protein, veggies also offer a variety of other vitamins and minerals. Peas, however, rate among the highest when looking specifically at protein content, with 8 grams per cup. Plus, they are convenient to toss into most meals. Leafy greens You’ve probably been lectured before to eat your leafy greens. That’s because they are loaded with nutritional benefits, including 3% to 12% of your daily recommended amount of protein. So load up on spinach , kale, mustard greens, Swiss chard and collard greens to increase your protein intake. Unsweetened raw cocoa powder You may not have expected to see chocolate on the list, but unsweetened raw cocoa powder provides a host of nutritional value, not the least of which is 1 gram of protein per tablespoon. Sprinkle it on fruit or throw it in your smoothies for a delicious protein boost. Nutritional yeast Nutritional yeast offers the essential vitamin B12, and a single tablespoon has about 5 grams of protein. Nutritional yeast can be used as a substitute for cheese. Shake it on popcorn, pasta, pizza, soups, potatoes and cooked veggies for a savory flavor and added protein. Via Choose My Plate , Health and My Food Data Images via Shutterstock

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The best sources for plant-based protein

1920s building in Buenos Aires becomes a gorgeous, solar-powered residence

February 4, 2020 by  
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Buenos Aires is known for its beautiful architecture, but retaining the city’s historic character while breathing life into its abandoned buildings is often challenging. Thankfully, local firm Moarqs  rose to the challenge when presented with the task of renovating a 1920s building into what is now the Tacuari House — a modern, energy-efficient residence that operates on solar power. Located in the Barracas neighborhood of Buenos Aires, the home was previously a dilapidated building that, according to local records, dates back almost a century. The building was originally broken up into several rental units centered around two open-air courtyards . Related: A Seattle midcentury home is restored to its original brilliance with a modern twist Led by architect Ignacio Montaldo, the design team faced numerous challenges when working on the historic building’s renovation . The first objective was to update the space into a modern residence while retaining its character. According to the studio, some elements, such as the ironwork and some ornate plasterwork, were able to be salvaged in the updated building. The first step was to rework the home’s layout so that the first central courtyard on the ground floor would become the heart of the home. To expand this space, the team demolished the back rooms to create a new central space, complete with a swimming pool and garden. The second step to the renovation process focused on adding a new building on the second floor, which would be used as the primary living space. Setting the new structure back from the official line of the home allowed the residents to have more privacy as well as more outdoor space. The new structure is made of a metal enclosure painted jet-black to contrast nicely with the bright outdoor space. A series of operable black shutters shade the interiors from the harsh sunlight in the summer , while welcoming in the heat and light during the cold winter months. Moarqs was able to restore the original calcareous and wooden floors as well as some of the home’s original ironwork. To modernize the space into an energy-efficient home, the designers added an array of solar panels on the roof and thermal panels for heating water. Now, the home perfectly blends its historic character with contemporary, green design. + Moarqs Via ArchDaily Photography by Albano Garcia and Javier Agustin Rojas via Moarqs

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1920s building in Buenos Aires becomes a gorgeous, solar-powered residence

A third of people in the UK are now eating less or no meat

November 6, 2018 by  
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A new report on food shopping in the U.K. shows that one in eight Britons is now vegetarian or vegan, and another 21 percent identify as flexitarians. This means that about a third of U.K. consumers have deliberately reduced or eliminated meat from their diets, and it underlines a revolution in the eating habits of U.K. citizens. Vegetarians have a diet that eliminates meat, poultry and fish, while vegans eat a plant-based diet and completely avoid all animal products. Flexitarians eat a largely vegetable-based diet and just occasionally supplement it with meat . Related: Look out, meat industry — flexitarianism is on the rise The report comes from the supermarket chain Waitrose, which studied the food choices of Britons across all British supermarket chains. The study shows that people are thinking about how they can individually counter climate change , and avoiding meat and dairy products seems to be the single biggest way that you can reduce your environmental impact on the planet. Waitrose’s report comes from a poll of 2,000 adults who shop a variety of retailers, plus research of millions of transactions in stores and online. The report found the most likely age range to make the switch to veganism is 18 to 34. “It’s extremely encouraging to learn how many Britons are choosing to reduce their consumption of animal products,” Nick Palmer, the head of Compassion in World Farming U.K., told The Guardian . Palmer added that science shows the healthiest diet is plant-heavy, and when you eat less meat, fish, eggs and dairy, you can help animals , people and the planet. The Vegan Society claimed that the number of vegans in the U.K. has increased 400 percent in the last four years, from 150,000 to 600,000. Last May, Waitrose became the first U.K. supermarket to put dedicated vegan sections in its stores, plus it also launched a line of vegan and vegetarian ready-to-eat meals. Vegan dining has also gone mainstream in the U.K., with many chains increasing their non-meat and non-dairy options. Some restaurants have also created menus dedicated to vegans, as more and more people discover just how amazing vegan food can taste. + Waitrose Via The Guardian Image via Mittmac

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A third of people in the UK are now eating less or no meat

Steel These Ideas: 15 Repurpose Projects Using Food Cans

June 23, 2015 by  
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Even if you try to eat a mainly fresh food diet, it’s inevitable that most of us will end up eating canned food on occasion. While it may not always be the healthiest choice, it’s very convenient on busy days and a better choice than fast food. So…

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Steel These Ideas: 15 Repurpose Projects Using Food Cans

The Search For Local Organic Food In The Arizona Desert, Or Shell-Shocked California Girl Goes Foraging in Phoenix

August 30, 2010 by  
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Photo by cogdogblog Locally raised organic food — it’s what anyone who wants to eat the healthiest foods with the smallest environmental footprint hunts for, right?

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The Search For Local Organic Food In The Arizona Desert, Or Shell-Shocked California Girl Goes Foraging in Phoenix

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