Brooklyn Home Company designs passive townhouse with raw wood elements

April 7, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

New York-based collective The Brooklyn Home Company has designed a passive townhouse in the Carroll Gardens neighborhood of Brooklyn in New York City. The townhouse, which was designed using Passive House principles, features four floors, a rooftop patio and a basement. The designers incorporated natural wood and soft tones into multiple aspects of the home to go along with the eco-friendly theme. There are beautiful hardwood floors and raw wooden furniture throughout, but the real heart of the home is realized in a gorgeous wooden staircase with raw wood banisters. The rooftop provides a functional sitting area surrounded by greenery and wooden walls. Related: New apartments bring sustainable architecture to the Upper West Side The passive design boosts energy-efficiency and soundproofing while an ERV filtering system provides the home with better indoor air quality, according to the company. The system is constantly extracting air toxins and stale air and releasing fresh, filtered air, all while regulating humidity levels. This consistent air circulating and humidity moderating not only improves air quality but also reduces the chance for airborne viruses to spread as it prevents mold growth and dryness in the air. Mold and air dryness are some of the most common causes for the spread of viruses in the wintertime and also factor into issues like allergies and dry skin. Passive House principals require airtight insulation, which keeps the home’s carbon footprint low and reduces heating and cooling bills. The Brooklyn Home Company also used triple-pane European windows to keep outside noise from getting into the townhouse. The company’s architectural manager is a Certified Passive House Designer, and The Brooklyn Home Company also teams up with New York City Passive House consultant and educator Bldtyp to oversee home builds. The company hopes that the cognitive and health benefits that better air quality bring into a house will inspire more homeowners to invest in the science and craftsmanship behind Passive House design . + The Brooklyn Home Company Photography by Matthew Williams via DADA Goldberg

Read the original:
Brooklyn Home Company designs passive townhouse with raw wood elements

COVID-19 lockdowns lead to decreasing light pollution

April 7, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Earth’s skies have grown increasingly brighter over the years, as humans accelerate their love of electricity . Then came 2020, the year of lockdowns. One welcome side effect has been reduced light pollution. A recent U.K. star count organized by a charity called CPRE found that light pollution continues to drop, with a 10% reduction since last year. Between February 6 and 14, 2021, CPRE collected nearly 8,000 star counts. If a person could only see 10 or fewer stars , that was considered severe light pollution. The group concluded that U.K. skies are the darkest they’ve been since 2013. Related: New study reveals main sources of light pollution “Looking up at a starry night sky is a magical sight and one that we believe everyone should be able to experience, wherever they live,” said Crispin Truman, chief executive of CPRE. “And the great thing is, light pollution is one of the easiest kinds of pollution to reverse.” Bright lights at night are more than just an annoyance. Many animals suffer when they get confused between day and night. “The introduction of artificial light probably represents the most drastic change human beings have made to their environment,” research scientist Christopher Kyba said of nocturnal animals. Cities are hundreds, if not thousands, of times brighter than they were 200 years ago. This messes up the cover that prey species rely upon, disrupts the nighttime croaking of frogs trying to attract a mate, confuses baby sea turtles who follow artificial lights away from the ocean and lures migratory birds off course. So how do we reverse light pollution? The easiest way is to turn lights off when they’re not needed. Instead of leaving outdoor security lights on at night, install motion sensors so they only turn on when needed. Encourage your local government to use only covered streetlights with the bulbs pointing down. Colored lights, such as red, yellow and amber, cause less light pollution than white light . Consider lining your pathways with glow stones for nighttime lighting. Their ambient glow doesn’t contribute to light pollution. Dan Monk, an astronomer in the U.K., said, “People often do get emotional when they sit under this amazing dark sky and they realize how small they are in the universe.” If we all do our part, we can share this experience. Via BBC , International Dark Sky Association and Conserve Energy Future Image via Felix Mittermeier

Excerpt from: 
COVID-19 lockdowns lead to decreasing light pollution

Cigarette butts, the No. 1 most-littered item, are impacting plant growth

July 22, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Cigarette butts, the No. 1 most-littered item, are impacting plant growth

In the frenzy to ban plastic utensils, foam containers, straws and single-use bags, the world’s No. 1 most-littered item has been mostly ignored: cigarette butts. Perhaps because they are small in size, two out of every three cigarettes are simply flung to the ground rather than properly disposed of. This adds up to 4.5 trillion cigarette butts every year piling up in parks, cities and oceans. New research suggests that the butts are not just unsightly; they are also negatively impacting plants. A study published in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety compared plants grown in soil containing cigarette butts with a group of control plants and found a significant difference. The plants grown in dirt with cigarettes had shoots that were up to 25 percent shorter with root biomass that was up to 60 percent smaller. Similar studies from as early as 1913 found similarly negative effects of cigarette smoke on plants , but few focus on the impact of butts within the soil. Related: California’s “Butt Lady” picks up 1M littered cigarette butts in 3.5 years Cigarettes are actually biodegradable but can take years to decompose. In the meantime, the discarded butts are filled with chemicals that, at this point, everyone knows are toxic and carcinogenic. Since the 1980s, urban and coastal clean-up events have reported that between 30 to 40 percent of the litter collected is typically cigarette butts. It is clearly a major issue in terms of pollution and waste, so why aren’t people outraged by it? Some environmental advocates argue that filters should be banned completely, since they have negligible health benefits to the smoker. Others argue that a deposit-and-return system could be established, where smokers must return their used butts in order to reclaim a deposit. This scheme seems fairly unlikely, but so did bans on plastic bags or diapers — yet municipalities and countries have successfully put them into effect. + Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety Via Phys.org Image via Pixabay

Here is the original post:
Cigarette butts, the No. 1 most-littered item, are impacting plant growth

Save the Coral Reefs with the Right Sunscreen

March 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Save the Coral Reefs with the Right Sunscreen

Getting outside comes with a host of health benefits, but … The post Save the Coral Reefs with the Right Sunscreen appeared first on Earth911.com.

Go here to see the original:
Save the Coral Reefs with the Right Sunscreen

Cutting Carbon Emissions Will Pay for Itself, MIT Study Shows

August 26, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Cutting Carbon Emissions Will Pay for Itself, MIT Study Shows

As politicians begin to use economic arguments to support cutting carbon emissions, a new study from MIT has confirmed that the flow-on health benefits of emissions reductions could save billions of dollars. In fact, the researchers found that savings from avoiding emissions-related health problems could recoup the U.S. up to 10.5 times the cost of implementing a cap-and-trade program. The results of this study were published this week in the journal Nature Climate Change. Read the rest of Cutting Carbon Emissions Will Pay for Itself, MIT Study Shows Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Air quality , carbon emissions , carbon trading , cost of carbon emissions scheme , emissions reduction scheme , epa , health benefits , MIT , Noelle Selin , Pollution

Read more:
Cutting Carbon Emissions Will Pay for Itself, MIT Study Shows

Benefits of Organic Food Go Beyond Vitamins and Minerals

September 6, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Benefits of Organic Food Go Beyond Vitamins and Minerals

It makes sense to this writer that organic food is a healthier option than convention produce, which is grown with  synthetic pesticides and fertilizers . Take away those harmful chemicals, and organic food ought to be better for you, right? I am not alone in this line thought, and as such, the organic food market is a $29 billion industry. However a new study is pouring cold water on this theory, suggesting that research into organic food has found “scant evidence of health benefits” — but is the new study missing the point? Read the rest of Benefits of Organic Food Go Beyond Vitamins and Minerals Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Annals of Internal Medicine , fertilizers , food production , health benefits , organic farming , organic food , pesticides , stanford university of medicine , vegetables

Go here to see the original: 
Benefits of Organic Food Go Beyond Vitamins and Minerals

Benefits of Organic Food Go Beyond Vitamins and Minerals

September 6, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Benefits of Organic Food Go Beyond Vitamins and Minerals

It makes sense to this writer that organic food is a healthier option than convention produce, which is grown with  synthetic pesticides and fertilizers . Take away those harmful chemicals, and organic food ought to be better for you, right? I am not alone in this line thought, and as such, the organic food market is a $29 billion industry. However a new study is pouring cold water on this theory, suggesting that research into organic food has found “scant evidence of health benefits” — but is the new study missing the point? Read the rest of Benefits of Organic Food Go Beyond Vitamins and Minerals Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Annals of Internal Medicine , fertilizers , food production , health benefits , organic farming , organic food , pesticides , stanford university of medicine , vegetables

Read more: 
Benefits of Organic Food Go Beyond Vitamins and Minerals

LAST CHANCE To Enter The HP Ultrabook Bag Design Contest & Win $10,000 – JUST 2 DAYS LEFT TO ENTER!

September 6, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on LAST CHANCE To Enter The HP Ultrabook Bag Design Contest & Win $10,000 – JUST 2 DAYS LEFT TO ENTER!

LAST CALL FOR LAPTOP BAG DESIGNS! Don’t miss out on your chance to WIN $10,000 in the The HP Ultrabook Bag Design Contest! Have you entered your idea for a new laptop bag in the HP Ultrabook Bag Design Competition ? If you haven’t, don’t delay, because there are just TWO DAYS LEFT to get your design in. We’ve teamed up with HP and Project Runway to challenge the design community to reinvent the way we carry our laptops, and we’re dying to see the what stylish, sustainable and innovative design you’ve got for their ultra-sleek HP Spectre XT Ultrabook . We’ll be accepting entries until September 8th . Five entries will be chosen by our readers for a round of final judging by editors from Core 77 and Inhabitat , and Mondo Guerra , fashion designer and Project Runway ‘s Season 8 and All Stars winner! Don’t miss out on your chance at a fortune of $10,000 CASH – submit your ideas today! Enter The HP Ultrabook Bag Design Contest > This post is sponsored by the sleek, stylish, lightweight HP Spectre XT Ultrabook™, inspired by  Intel . Design a bag that is just as stylish!  Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: accessory design competition , bag design contest , computer bags , computer case , computer purse , core 77 design competition , design competition cash prize , eco laptop bags , eco-friendly laptop bags , fashion design competition , green design competition , green laptop bags , hp contest , hp design contest , hp ultrabook bag , hp ultrabook bag design contest , hp utlrabook , industrial design competition , Inhabitat Design Competition , laptop bag design contest , laptop case , lightweight laptop bag , mondo , mondo guerra , product design competition , Project Runway , project runway contests , purse design contest

See the rest here: 
LAST CHANCE To Enter The HP Ultrabook Bag Design Contest & Win $10,000 – JUST 2 DAYS LEFT TO ENTER!

Japan’s Modernist Spread House is an Elegant, Low-Impact Home with a Tree Growing Through It

September 6, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Japan’s Modernist Spread House is an Elegant, Low-Impact Home with a Tree Growing Through It

Read the rest of Japan’s Modernist Spread House is an Elegant, Low-Impact Home with a Tree Growing Through It Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Cedar Wood , inner courtyard , Japan , Makoto Takei + Chie Nabeshima , Nature , Spread House , TNA

Here is the original post:
Japan’s Modernist Spread House is an Elegant, Low-Impact Home with a Tree Growing Through It

Can Someone Explain “Organic Tobacco” to Me?

February 12, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Can Someone Explain “Organic Tobacco” to Me?

I was at a turf industry trade show yesterday talking to a salesperson from a company that markets Organic fertilizer to golf courses ( they describe it as the “natural amino acids found in feather, blood, meat and fish meals” ).

Read the original here: 
Can Someone Explain “Organic Tobacco” to Me?

Bad Behavior has blocked 1506 access attempts in the last 7 days.