Just before he died, Stephen Hawking predicted the ‘end of the universe’

March 19, 2018 by  
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Just before he died, Stephen Hawking was working on a groundbreaking study that predicted the end of the world and sought to prove the multiverse theory. His co-author Professor Thomas Hertog, of KU Leuven University in Belgium, says that the work is so important that Hawking could have received a Nobel Prize had he not passed away last week . Hawking’s paper, titled “A Smooth Exit From Eternal Inflation,” looks at ways in which humans could identify parallel universes – known as the multiverse theory – using probes on spaceships. It also theorizes about the end of the universe, saying that it will end as the stars run out of energy. Related: Beloved physicist Stephen Hawking passes away at 76 The paper is currently being reviewed by a leading scientific journal, and while it will no doubt contribute to our understanding of the world around us, sadly, Hawking can’t win a Nobel Prize for his work. “He has often been nominated for the Nobel and should have won it. Now he never can,” Prof Hertog told The Sunday Times . Via The Independent an CNBC Images via Wikimedia and Flickr  under CC license

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Just before he died, Stephen Hawking predicted the ‘end of the universe’

Agtech start-up Plenty plans to grow hydroponic peaches

March 19, 2018 by  
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San Francisco -based start-up Plenty is expanding the possibilities of what can be grown on indoor farms, with its sights set on peaches. Plenty uses a hydroponic growing system, which feeds crops through a steady flow of nutrient-rich water, to grow high-quality, local produce. This kind of system is typically used to grow annual crops, not perennial trees like peaches. Nonetheless, Plenty’s success has the company confident that it can break new ground. “[Plenty’s kale] is nothing like the tough, bitter leaf we’re used to,” Plenty CEO  Matt Barnard proudly stated to Wired . “It’s sweet and velvety. People say we should find another name for it.” Plenty grows its crops indoors thanks to light supplies by LEDs and vertically-aligned growing spaces. This allows for greater crop density, which best serves the urban environment in which Plenty farms. In addition to its environmental benefits, Plenty’s local harvest tastes better too. “Right now, produce often has to travel 3,000 miles from the farm to consumer,” said Barnard, “which is why so many farms grow iceberg lettuce , which tastes of nothing. Our salads are spicy and citrusy and sweet at the same time. People are amazed they can eat it without salad dressing.” Related: 6 places where soil-less farming is revolutionizing how we grow food The primary obstacle to greater success for operations like Plenty is cost. “Anyone can buy some shelves, some lights, irrigation,” said Barnard. “The challenge is to get your produce down from $40 per pound to $1. At the moment, for example, we have an expensive peach.” Plenty plans to incorporate data and machine learning capabilities into the system, so as to allow for algorithmic alterations based on plant needs. “Now we are having what I like to [call] a ‘Google moment,’” explained Barnard. “Just like Google benefited from the simultaneous combination of improved technology, better algorithms and masses of data, we are seeing the same.” Via Wired Images via Plenty and Depositphotos

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Agtech start-up Plenty plans to grow hydroponic peaches

Airbus wants to harpoon a satellite and bring it back to Earth

March 19, 2018 by  
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The aeronautics company Airbus is currently testing a three-foot harpoon they hope will catch the nonfunctional satellite Envisat and pull it back to Earth. This particular proposal may also address the rising problem of space debris. “If we can design a harpoon that can cope with Envisat, then it should be able to cope with all other types of spacecraft including the many rocket upper-stages that remain in orbit,” project engineer Alastair Wayman told the BBC . Prior to launch, the harpoons are being tested by being shot at high speeds into various materials that are used to build satellites. “The harpoon goes through these panels like a hot knife through butter ,” said Wayman. “Once the tip is inside, it has a set of barbs that open up and stop the harpoon from coming back out. We’d then de-tumble the satellite with a tether on the other end.” In the end, the ancient technology of the harpoon may prove more effective than robotic arms in space. “Many of these targets will be tumbling and if you were to use a robotic arm, say, that involves a lot of quite complex motions to follow your target,” explained Wayman.”Whereas, with the harpoon, all you have to do is sit a distance away, wait for the target to rotate underneath you, and at the right moment fire your harpoon. And because it’s a really quick event, it takes out a lot of the complexity.” Related: Space Scientists Develop Harpoon System to Capture Rogue Satellites and Clean up Space Junk Prior to its sudden death in 2012, Envisat, operated by the European Space Agency (ESA), was the world’s largest civilian Earth observation satellite. The ESA hopes to bring it back home, starting with a scaled-down harpoon expedition known as the RemoveDEBRIS Mission. The RemoveDEBRIS demo satellite will bring its own debris into space, then attempt to catch it. This experiment will also test a net-based system. Via BBC Images via European Space Agency and  RemoveDEBRIS Mission

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Airbus wants to harpoon a satellite and bring it back to Earth

Beloved physicist Stephen Hawking passes away at 76

March 14, 2018 by  
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Stephen Hawking , the brilliant and iconic British scientist who inspired countless millions with his intellect and humanity, has died at 76. After being diagnosed with a degenerative motor neuron disease similar to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at age 21, which left him nearly completely paralyzed, Hawking found strength in humor and the boundless exploration of science. “My goal is simple,” he famously said. “It is complete understanding of the universe, why it is as it is and why it exists at all.” His achievements as an astrophysicist include his theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, (sometimes referred to as Hawking radiation), his work on gravitational singularity theorems in the framework of general relativity, and his 30-year tenure as Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, a position once held by Sir Isaac Newton. Throughout his life, Hawking traveled the world, inspiring and teaching others, and worked to make science accessible. His 1989 classic A Brief History of Time was written for a mainstream audience on a subject with which few were familiar, emphasizing Hawking’s drive to bring science to the people. Hawking also wrote a series of children’s books with his daughter Lucy to help young people discover their love for science. Hawking’s approach to accessibility was framed by his own physical disability , which left him unable to physically speak. Using a vocal synthesizer controlled by finger movements, and later his cheek muscle, Hawking found his voice again and used it. When asked why he did not update his voice as artificial speech technology had advanced, he replied , “My old system worked well and I wrote five books with it, including ‘A Brief History of Time’. It has become my trademark and I wouldn’t change it for a more natural voice with a British accent. I am told that children who need a computer voice want one like mine.” Related: Stephen Hawking reveals what existed before the Big Bang Hawking wielded his sense of humor to connect with others and to motivate himself in trying times. “Keeping an active mind has been vital to my survival, as has maintaining a sense of humor ,” Hawking observed in a 2013 documentary . “I am probably better known for my appearances on The Simpsons and on The Big Bang Theory than I am for my scientific discoveries.” In his guest appearance on the former television series, Hawking found scientific inspiration from Homer Simpson. “Your theory of a doughnut shaped universe is intriguing, Homer,” Hawkings said in a 1999 episode. “I may have to steal it.” As one of the longest surviving people with ALS, Hawking credited humor with his longevity. “When I turned 21, my expectations were reduced to zero,” he said in 2016 . “It was important that I came to appreciate what I did have . . . It’s also important not to become angry, no matter how difficult life is, because you can lose all hope if you can’t laugh at yourself and at life in general.” Via Washington Post Images via Wikimedia

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Beloved physicist Stephen Hawking passes away at 76

Stephen Hawking Urges Continued Space Exploration So As We Can Outlive Our “Fragile Planet”

April 12, 2013 by  
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When Stephen Hawking speaks, you listen. The world-renowned physicist gave a speech recently as he toured the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center to support research for Lou Gehrig’s disease, a condition from which he suffers. In his speech, Hawking urges scientists to continue exploring space to secure the future of humanity. “ I don’t think we will survive another thousand years without escaping beyond our fragile planet,” he says. Read the rest of Stephen Hawking Urges Continued Space Exploration So As We Can Outlive Our “Fragile Planet” Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: A Brief History of Mine , A Brief History of Time , ALS research , global warming , Lou Gehrig’s disease research , space exploration , stem cell research , Stephen Hawking 70th birthday , Stephen Hawking speech , Stephen Hawking urges space exploration , Stephen Hawking visits Cedar Sinai        

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Stephen Hawking Urges Continued Space Exploration So As We Can Outlive Our “Fragile Planet”

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