Rising Seas: Hawaiian Island Wiped off the Map

October 28, 2018 by  
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Have you heard of Hawaii’s East Island? Probably not, but … The post Rising Seas: Hawaiian Island Wiped off the Map appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Rising Seas: Hawaiian Island Wiped off the Map

State of emergency in effect as Hurricane Lane barrels toward Hawaiian coastline

August 23, 2018 by  
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Hurricane Lane is swiftly moving along its course toward Hawaii, where a hurricane warning is in effect for Maui and the Big Island. A hurricane watch has also been issued for Kauai and Oahu. According to the National Weather Service , the storm has now been downgraded to a Category 4 hurricane and is expected to make contact with the state later today. Related: After three months, Kilauea eruptions might be over The NWS reported that “the center of Lane will track dangerously close to the Hawaiian Islands from Thursday through Saturday.” In addition, the organization noted that, “regardless of the exact track of the storm center, life-threatening impacts are likely over some areas as this strong hurricane makes its closest approach.” Despite the storm’s demotion from a Category 5 to a Category 4, many locals are comparing Hurricane Lane to the devastating Hurricane Iniki, which hit Hawaii in 1992. Governor David Ige signed an emergency proclamation on Tuesday in case Hawaii needs relief for “disaster damages, losses and suffering.” In a news release from the Governor’s office , Ige said, “Hurricane Lane is not a well-behaved hurricane. I’ve not seen such dramatic changes in the forecast track as I’ve seen with this storm. I urge our residents and visitors to take this threat seriously and prepare for a significant impact.” Related: The Eye of the Storm dome home can withstand hurricanes — and it’s officially on the market Residents have already “rushed to stores to stock up on bottled water, ramen, toilet paper and other supplies,” according to an Associated Press report. With maximum sustained winds of 155 mph and rainfall accumulations of between 10-15 inches, the storm is expected to cause flash-flooding and landslides in Hawaii. In addition, the NWS has reported the possibility of “large and potentially damaging surf.” As the hurricane continues to approach the Hawaiian coastline, many residents are hoping Lane will show a little more mercy than 1992’s Iniki, which killed six people and caused $1.8 billion worth of damage. Numerous government buildings have closed as the state’s residents prepare for the storm. Via NPR Image via Shutterstock

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State of emergency in effect as Hurricane Lane barrels toward Hawaiian coastline

How stakeholders are building brilliant, resilient Hawaii infrastructure

July 30, 2018 by  
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The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. This episode: Hawaiian infrastructure stakeholders discuss the challenges in resilience for Hawaii.

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How stakeholders are building brilliant, resilient Hawaii infrastructure

Mount Kilauea transforms Hawaii’s coastline with the birth of a new island

July 18, 2018 by  
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Mount Kilauea may have disappeared from the news for a while, but it isn’t done surprising us yet: the Hawaiian volcano has officially created a new island in the Pacific Ocean. Geologists working at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have reported the appearance of a tiny islet, measuring 20-30 feet in diameter, off the eastern shore of Hawaii . The new island was first seen by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) when it conducted a fly-by of the volcanic area on Friday, July 13. Records from the USGS mark the island’s inception and official birth date as July 12. As of Monday, July 16, the baby island has been declassified, forced to abandon its status after a tether to the mainland developed over the weekend. The official term for the new congealed lava structure is ‘tumulus’. Tumuli evolve as slow-moving molten lava forces newly formed crust upward. Related: Hawaii’s Kilauea is creating its own weather The most reasonable explanation for the accumulation is the overflowing of lava from the volcano’s East Rift Zone. This molten river has continued its advance into the ocean for over a month, creating a submerged segment of new-but-unstable territory that stretches almost a half-mile outwards from Hawaii’s shoreline. Other scientists attribute the new island to Fissure 8, the most active of Kilauea’s volcanic fissures. In the future, it would be no surprise to see more changes to Hawaii’s coast. Kilauea, whose name means ‘spewing’ in Hawaiian, has been continuously erupting since 1983, with records dating back to the early 1800s. In fact, Kilauea tops the charts as one of the most active volcanoes in the world despite being one of Hawaii’s youngest. The 2018 eruption marks Kilauea’s 61st official incident. Regardless of the newbie island’s complicated classification status, Hawaii will eventually boast a newer, slightly larger coastline for tourists and environmental enthusiasts to admire. In fact, many visitors have already posted selfies with the volcano on social media despite warnings against it. However, it’s safe to assume that most of us are waiting for a less perilous way to explore Hawaii’s new treasures. Perhaps a good old Google Maps update is in order? + USGS Via Earther Images via USGS

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Mount Kilauea transforms Hawaii’s coastline with the birth of a new island

Episode 129: Industry touts EV charging standards, plus a message from the future

June 21, 2018 by  
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On this episode, three Hawaiian teenagers urge sustainability professionals to listen more. Plus insights on the evolution of environment, social and governance disclosure from consulting firms ERM and Trucost.

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Episode 129: Industry touts EV charging standards, plus a message from the future

Artist creates impossibly realistic murals in Hawaiian waterways while balanced on a surfboard

May 26, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Artist creates impossibly realistic murals in Hawaiian waterways while balanced on a surfboard Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: hawaii , hawaii street art , hula , realistic portraits , sean yoro , Street art , water murals , waterway murals

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Artist creates impossibly realistic murals in Hawaiian waterways while balanced on a surfboard

The Kupuna waterproof watch is handcrafted from Hawaiian Koa wood

April 9, 2015 by  
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Wish you could carry a piece of Hawaii wherever you go? AINA Jewelry makes that possible with The Kupuna , a waterproof watch handcrafted from Hawaiian Koa wood. Sourced from the upper slopes of Mauna Kea, an active volcano on Hawaii’s ‘Big Island,’ the endemic wood boasts a distinct dark coloration and golden grain. The lightweight and stylish Kupuna watch is available for purchase on Kickstarter . + The Kupuna The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: AINA Jewelry , Hawaiian Koa wood , kickstarter , koa wood , Kupuna , Kupuna watch , reader submitted content , waterproof watch

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The Kupuna waterproof watch is handcrafted from Hawaiian Koa wood

H&M’s New Hawaiian-Inspired Collection To Benefit Water Aid

June 2, 2012 by  
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With its new  “H&M for Water” collection, Swedish retailer H&M is rolling out a whole new line of Hawaiian-themed dresses, shirts, swimsuits, board shorts, and accessories that are made of sustainable materials like as  organic cotton ,  Tencel , linen and silk. But green fabric isn’t the only thing we like about the resort wear; 25 percent of proceeds will benefit  WaterAid , an international nonprofit that provides clean water and sanitation to some of the world’s poorest communities. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Clothes , Fashion , H&M for Water , Hawaiian shirt , swimsuits , WaterAid

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H&M’s New Hawaiian-Inspired Collection To Benefit Water Aid

24 Endangered Birds Gifted Their Own Hawaiian Island

September 23, 2011 by  
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Photo and inset via Wikipedia Commons For a handfull of lucky, yet critically endangered songbirds, life just got a whole lot roomier. The tiny species of Millerbird, native to Hawaii’s Nihoa island, has been teetering on the brink of extinction there for decades. But now, in an attempt to hedge the chances of the bird’s survival, conservationists have gifted two… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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24 Endangered Birds Gifted Their Own Hawaiian Island

Hawaii’s Oahu Island Could Receive 25% of its Electricity from Wind and Solar

March 25, 2011 by  
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Hawaii is famous for many things – surfing, Hawaii 5-0 , grass skirts, and the sun, so it seems obvious that the islands would embrace solar power. A new study by Hawaii’s Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) at the University of Hawaii at M?noa, General Electric (GE) Company, and the Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) has revealed that Oahu could fulfill 25% of its energy demands by taking advantage of 500 MW of wind power and 100 MW of solar power. Read the rest of Hawaii’s Oahu Island Could Receive 25% of its Electricity from Wind and Solar http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: general electric , hawaii 5-0 , hawaii electric company , hawaii natural energy institute , Hawaii Solar Power , hawaii wind power , surfing , university of hawaii

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Hawaii’s Oahu Island Could Receive 25% of its Electricity from Wind and Solar

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