First-of-its-kind device prototype harnesses renewable energy from ocean waves

October 16, 2019 by  
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Our planet is a water world, covered with 70 percent oceans. For centuries, it’s been widely known that the high seas can generate energy, if harnessed appropriately. With today’s renewables market rapidly expanding, it’s no wonder then that wave energy has recently gained traction as a contemporary, clean energy source. Two companies have jointly completed a marine hydrokinetic convertor, the OE Buoy, to leverage wave power as a renewable, green energy source. The city of Portland, Oregon is corporate headquarters to Vigor, a marine and industrial fabrication company that has had a long-standing record of cutting edge engineering projects. For this endeavor, Vigor teamed up with Irish wave-power pioneer Ocean Energy in a collaborative effort to push marine hydrokinetic technologies forward. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy and the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) helped to fund the $12 million design project. Related: Renewable energy surpasses fossil fuels in the UK Weighing 826 tons, the OE Buoy wave device measures 125 feet long, 59 feet wide and 68 feet tall. It will be deployed at the U.S. Navy Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) on the windward side of the Hawaiian island of Oahu, off the coast of Naval Base Pearl Harbor. The buoy has the potential to generate up to 1.25 megawatts of electrical power. In other words, it has enough utility-quality electricity supply to support marine-based data centers, desalination plants, naval autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) power platforms, offshore fish farming and off-grid applications for remote island communities. Besides that, the buoy has the capacity to greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, making it a cleaner, more sustainable source of renewable energy . “This first-of-its kind wave energy convertor is scalable, reliable and capable of generating sustainable power to facilitate a range of use-cases that were previously unimaginable or just impractical,” said John McCarthy, CEO of Ocean Energy. “This internationally significant project will be invaluable to job creation, renewable energy generation and greenhouse gas reduction. Additionally, technology companies will be able to benefit from wave power through the development of OE Buoy devices as marine-based data storage and processing centers. The major players in Big Data are already experimenting with subsea data centers to take advantage of the energy savings by cooling these systems in the sea. OE Buoy now presents them with the potential double-benefit of ocean cooling and ocean energy in the one device.” + Vigor + Ocean Energy Via OPB Image via Tiluria

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First-of-its-kind device prototype harnesses renewable energy from ocean waves

Self-sustainable childrens center in Tanzania harvests water like a baobab tree

October 16, 2019 by  
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In northern Tanzania, a Swedish team of architects, engineers and a non-profit collaborated with local workers to complete the Econef Children’s Center, a self-sustaining facility for orphans in the King’ori village. Asante Architecture & Design , Lönnqvist & Vanamo Architects , Architects Without Borders Sweden, Engineers Without Borders Sweden and Swedish-Tanzanian NGO ECONOF created the center to provide sleeping quarters and classrooms to orphaned children, as well as to also increase ECONEF’s independence by reducing building maintenance and operation costs. The off-grid buildings are powered with solar energy and harvest rainwater in a system inspired by the African baobab tree. Built to follow the local building vernacular, the Econef Children’s Center uses locally found materials and building techniques to keep costs low and to minimize the need for external construction expertise. The new center provides sleeping quarters and classrooms for 25 children. “The aim of the Children’s Center Project is to increase ECONEF’S independence and reduce its reliance on private donations,” explains the team in a project statement. “To help achieve this goal the new buildings are planned to be ecologically and economically sustainable and largely maintenance free. The center produces its own electricity through the installation of solar panels. Systems for rainwater harvesting and natural ventilation are integrated into the architectural design.” Related: Timber-clad waterfront house in Norway epitomizes modern Scandinavian design Inspired by the African baobab tree that can retain up to 120,000 liters of water in its trunk to survive in the desert, the building’s rainwater harvesting system draws rainwater from the roof’s spine through a central gutter that funnels the water into two water tanks tucked beneath the two of the inner courtyards. The collected rainwater is used for showers and laundry. + ECONEF Images by Robin Hayes

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Self-sustainable childrens center in Tanzania harvests water like a baobab tree

Rising Seas: Hawaiian Island Wiped off the Map

October 28, 2018 by  
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Have you heard of Hawaii’s East Island? Probably not, but … The post Rising Seas: Hawaiian Island Wiped off the Map appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Rising Seas: Hawaiian Island Wiped off the Map

State of emergency in effect as Hurricane Lane barrels toward Hawaiian coastline

August 23, 2018 by  
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Hurricane Lane is swiftly moving along its course toward Hawaii, where a hurricane warning is in effect for Maui and the Big Island. A hurricane watch has also been issued for Kauai and Oahu. According to the National Weather Service , the storm has now been downgraded to a Category 4 hurricane and is expected to make contact with the state later today. Related: After three months, Kilauea eruptions might be over The NWS reported that “the center of Lane will track dangerously close to the Hawaiian Islands from Thursday through Saturday.” In addition, the organization noted that, “regardless of the exact track of the storm center, life-threatening impacts are likely over some areas as this strong hurricane makes its closest approach.” Despite the storm’s demotion from a Category 5 to a Category 4, many locals are comparing Hurricane Lane to the devastating Hurricane Iniki, which hit Hawaii in 1992. Governor David Ige signed an emergency proclamation on Tuesday in case Hawaii needs relief for “disaster damages, losses and suffering.” In a news release from the Governor’s office , Ige said, “Hurricane Lane is not a well-behaved hurricane. I’ve not seen such dramatic changes in the forecast track as I’ve seen with this storm. I urge our residents and visitors to take this threat seriously and prepare for a significant impact.” Related: The Eye of the Storm dome home can withstand hurricanes — and it’s officially on the market Residents have already “rushed to stores to stock up on bottled water, ramen, toilet paper and other supplies,” according to an Associated Press report. With maximum sustained winds of 155 mph and rainfall accumulations of between 10-15 inches, the storm is expected to cause flash-flooding and landslides in Hawaii. In addition, the NWS has reported the possibility of “large and potentially damaging surf.” As the hurricane continues to approach the Hawaiian coastline, many residents are hoping Lane will show a little more mercy than 1992’s Iniki, which killed six people and caused $1.8 billion worth of damage. Numerous government buildings have closed as the state’s residents prepare for the storm. Via NPR Image via Shutterstock

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State of emergency in effect as Hurricane Lane barrels toward Hawaiian coastline

How stakeholders are building brilliant, resilient Hawaii infrastructure

July 30, 2018 by  
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The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. This episode: Hawaiian infrastructure stakeholders discuss the challenges in resilience for Hawaii.

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How stakeholders are building brilliant, resilient Hawaii infrastructure

Mount Kilauea transforms Hawaii’s coastline with the birth of a new island

July 18, 2018 by  
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Mount Kilauea may have disappeared from the news for a while, but it isn’t done surprising us yet: the Hawaiian volcano has officially created a new island in the Pacific Ocean. Geologists working at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have reported the appearance of a tiny islet, measuring 20-30 feet in diameter, off the eastern shore of Hawaii . The new island was first seen by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) when it conducted a fly-by of the volcanic area on Friday, July 13. Records from the USGS mark the island’s inception and official birth date as July 12. As of Monday, July 16, the baby island has been declassified, forced to abandon its status after a tether to the mainland developed over the weekend. The official term for the new congealed lava structure is ‘tumulus’. Tumuli evolve as slow-moving molten lava forces newly formed crust upward. Related: Hawaii’s Kilauea is creating its own weather The most reasonable explanation for the accumulation is the overflowing of lava from the volcano’s East Rift Zone. This molten river has continued its advance into the ocean for over a month, creating a submerged segment of new-but-unstable territory that stretches almost a half-mile outwards from Hawaii’s shoreline. Other scientists attribute the new island to Fissure 8, the most active of Kilauea’s volcanic fissures. In the future, it would be no surprise to see more changes to Hawaii’s coast. Kilauea, whose name means ‘spewing’ in Hawaiian, has been continuously erupting since 1983, with records dating back to the early 1800s. In fact, Kilauea tops the charts as one of the most active volcanoes in the world despite being one of Hawaii’s youngest. The 2018 eruption marks Kilauea’s 61st official incident. Regardless of the newbie island’s complicated classification status, Hawaii will eventually boast a newer, slightly larger coastline for tourists and environmental enthusiasts to admire. In fact, many visitors have already posted selfies with the volcano on social media despite warnings against it. However, it’s safe to assume that most of us are waiting for a less perilous way to explore Hawaii’s new treasures. Perhaps a good old Google Maps update is in order? + USGS Via Earther Images via USGS

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Mount Kilauea transforms Hawaii’s coastline with the birth of a new island

Episode 129: Industry touts EV charging standards, plus a message from the future

June 21, 2018 by  
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On this episode, three Hawaiian teenagers urge sustainability professionals to listen more. Plus insights on the evolution of environment, social and governance disclosure from consulting firms ERM and Trucost.

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Episode 129: Industry touts EV charging standards, plus a message from the future

Artist creates impossibly realistic murals in Hawaiian waterways while balanced on a surfboard

May 26, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Artist creates impossibly realistic murals in Hawaiian waterways while balanced on a surfboard Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: hawaii , hawaii street art , hula , realistic portraits , sean yoro , Street art , water murals , waterway murals

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Artist creates impossibly realistic murals in Hawaiian waterways while balanced on a surfboard

The Kupuna waterproof watch is handcrafted from Hawaiian Koa wood

April 9, 2015 by  
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Wish you could carry a piece of Hawaii wherever you go? AINA Jewelry makes that possible with The Kupuna , a waterproof watch handcrafted from Hawaiian Koa wood. Sourced from the upper slopes of Mauna Kea, an active volcano on Hawaii’s ‘Big Island,’ the endemic wood boasts a distinct dark coloration and golden grain. The lightweight and stylish Kupuna watch is available for purchase on Kickstarter . + The Kupuna The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: AINA Jewelry , Hawaiian Koa wood , kickstarter , koa wood , Kupuna , Kupuna watch , reader submitted content , waterproof watch

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The Kupuna waterproof watch is handcrafted from Hawaiian Koa wood

H&M’s New Hawaiian-Inspired Collection To Benefit Water Aid

June 2, 2012 by  
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With its new  “H&M for Water” collection, Swedish retailer H&M is rolling out a whole new line of Hawaiian-themed dresses, shirts, swimsuits, board shorts, and accessories that are made of sustainable materials like as  organic cotton ,  Tencel , linen and silk. But green fabric isn’t the only thing we like about the resort wear; 25 percent of proceeds will benefit  WaterAid , an international nonprofit that provides clean water and sanitation to some of the world’s poorest communities. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Clothes , Fashion , H&M for Water , Hawaiian shirt , swimsuits , WaterAid

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H&M’s New Hawaiian-Inspired Collection To Benefit Water Aid

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