A Hawaiian island has been wiped out by Hurricane Walaka

October 24, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A Hawaiian island has been wiped out by Hurricane Walaka

Hurricane Walaka, a powerful hurricane that hit Hawaii earlier this month, has wiped a Hawaiian island off of the map. East Island, a remote, 11-acre area of gravel and sand that sat on top of a coral reef, has disappeared after coming into contact with the intense storm. According to The Guardian , scientists have confirmed that the island vanished after comparing satellite images of the French Frigate Shoals — a protected marine area in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands. “I uttered a swear word. I had a ‘holy cow!’ moment, somewhat in disbelief that it had disappeared,” said Chip Fletcher, a professor of earth sciences at the University of Hawaii. “The island was probably one to two thousand years old, and we were only there in July, so for it to be lost right now is pretty bad luck.” Related: Mount Kilauea transforms Hawaii’s coastline with the birth of a new island Fletcher and his colleagues were researching East Island via drone devices and sand and coral samples. They were trying to determine the age of the island and determine its future, particularly in regard to climate change. Fletcher said that they wanted to monitor the island and are disappointed that it is gone; however, they have learned that the islands are more at risk than previously thought. East Island was only a half-mile long and 400 feet wide, but it was the second-largest island in the French Frigate Shoals. Even though it was small, the island was an important ecosystem for local wildlife. The critically endangered Hawaiian monk seal used East Island to raise their young. Threatened green sea turtles and albatrosses also depended on East Island for survival. In the right conditions, an atoll like French Frigate Shoals is always at risk when a hurricane hits. But  climate change is warming the ocean and atmosphere, leading to more powerful and frequent storms. Fletcher said the loss is a huge blow, and the team did not expect the island to disappear that quickly. Randy Kosaki, a senior official for the Hawaii monument at NOAA, said that the “take-home message” is that climate change is real, and it is happening right now. Via The Guardian Images via NOAA and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Read more: 
A Hawaiian island has been wiped out by Hurricane Walaka

Zigzagging green terraces make up a luxury residential block in Mexico City

October 24, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Zigzagging green terraces make up a luxury residential block in Mexico City

A challenging hillside site in Mexico City has given rise to Alcázar de Toledo, a luxury residential development designed by Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos to look like an extension of its lush landscape. Embedded into the rugged terrain, the five-unit apartment block is made up of a series of green terraces that zigzag up the slope and provide deep roof overhangs to the bands of glass that wrap around the residences. In addition to its striking and sculptural form, the 5,471-square-meter building also affords spectacular panoramic views of the city. Completed in 2018, Alcázar de Toledo consists of four levels. The parking spaces are located on the topmost floor that descends via ramp down 5 meters to the reception and lobby with views of a large wooded area as well a water focal point with fountains. The five apartment units are spread out across the remaining floors, with two 500-square-meter properties on the level below parking; a 700-square-meter unit on the floor below; and two more 500-square-meter apartments placed on the lowest level. The different sizes of each unit translate to different programming and range from two to four bedrooms. A pool , spa, gym, terrace, dressing rooms and bathrooms are located on the second level from the bottom. “The architectural concept is based on a linear element, which folds itself over the topography in a right-angled zigzag shape,” the architects explained. “Each fold responds to different needs and contains the spaces for the five departments, with large terraces , amenities and parking. This resulting piece of four levels, as it adapts to the ground, is transformed into a structure element (like a wall or slab) or an open plaza or terrace. A solution that creates an elegant and subtle shape with a clear horizontality between the native vegetation of the context.” Related: A lush rooftop oasis flourishes on this renovated Art Deco townhouse in Mexico City Natural light and ventilation are maximized through the interiors, which all feature tall ceilings, open-plan common areas and full-height glazing shaded by the overhanging green roofs. Rainwater is also harvested, treated and reused on site for irrigation. The rainwater cistern is located beneath the building. + Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos Photography by Jaime Navarro via Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos

Read the original: 
Zigzagging green terraces make up a luxury residential block in Mexico City

The unique history — and future — of Hawaii

August 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The unique history — and future — of Hawaii

The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. This episode: Ramsay Taum, the direct ro of external affairs at the University of Hawaii, on the state’s special relationship with the changing climate.

Original post:
The unique history — and future — of Hawaii

Sustainable nutrition: a new term for an old concern

August 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Sustainable nutrition: a new term for an old concern

Sponsored: The complexities of balancing human nutrition and sustainable land use.

Here is the original:
Sustainable nutrition: a new term for an old concern

Kroger plans plastic bag phase-out by 2025

August 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Kroger plans plastic bag phase-out by 2025

The Kroger supermarket conglomerate announced on Thursday that it is planning a phase-out of plastic bags at all store locations as part of its Zero Hunger | Zero Waste commitment . The company owns more than 2,700 stores throughout 35 states, including popular chains such as Harris Teeter, Fred Meyer and Ralphs. Related: UK bag tariff halves plastic bag marine litter, reduces sales of plastic bags by 86% Kroger is making a “bold move that will better protect our planet,” according to CEO Rodney McMullen. “We listen very closely to our customers and our communities, and we agree with their growing concerns,” added Executive Vice President and COO Mike Donnelly in a press release. Seattle’s QFC grocery stores will be the first of Kroger’s chains to fully eliminate plastic bags, achieving the goal as early as next year. “Starting today at QFC, we will begin the transition to more sustainable options. This decision aligns with our Restock Kroger commitment to live our purpose through social impact,” announced Donnelly. Between the Zero Hunger | Zero Waste and the Restock Kroger commitments, the company hopes to divert 90 percent of waste from landfills by 2020 and provide food to families and individuals in need. Last year alone, the conglomerate sent more than 91 million pounds of safe, nutritious food to local food banks and homes, providing over 325 million meals in total. In 2017, 66.15 million pounds of plastic and 2.43 billion pounds of cardboard were recycled. Kroger, however, wants to achieve more. Related: Starbucks ditches plastic straws for the environment Estimates suggest that less than five percent of plastic bags are recycled annually in America and nearly 100 billion are thrown away each year. Single-use plastic bags are the fifth most common plastic pollutant, harming waterways and marine ecosystems. Harmful microplastics result from the breakdown process and have made their way into soils, waters, air, and nearly everything we ingest. That’s why Kroger, rather than merely lessening the number of plastic bags, plans to eliminate them completely by providing reusable, recyclable multi-use bags. Kroger joins companies such as Starbucks, McDonald’s and the Marriot International Group in a stand to eliminate single-use plastics, which follows legislation banning them in states such as Hawaii and California. + CNN + Kroger + NPR Image via Pixabay

More: 
Kroger plans plastic bag phase-out by 2025

State of emergency in effect as Hurricane Lane barrels toward Hawaiian coastline

August 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on State of emergency in effect as Hurricane Lane barrels toward Hawaiian coastline

Hurricane Lane is swiftly moving along its course toward Hawaii, where a hurricane warning is in effect for Maui and the Big Island. A hurricane watch has also been issued for Kauai and Oahu. According to the National Weather Service , the storm has now been downgraded to a Category 4 hurricane and is expected to make contact with the state later today. Related: After three months, Kilauea eruptions might be over The NWS reported that “the center of Lane will track dangerously close to the Hawaiian Islands from Thursday through Saturday.” In addition, the organization noted that, “regardless of the exact track of the storm center, life-threatening impacts are likely over some areas as this strong hurricane makes its closest approach.” Despite the storm’s demotion from a Category 5 to a Category 4, many locals are comparing Hurricane Lane to the devastating Hurricane Iniki, which hit Hawaii in 1992. Governor David Ige signed an emergency proclamation on Tuesday in case Hawaii needs relief for “disaster damages, losses and suffering.” In a news release from the Governor’s office , Ige said, “Hurricane Lane is not a well-behaved hurricane. I’ve not seen such dramatic changes in the forecast track as I’ve seen with this storm. I urge our residents and visitors to take this threat seriously and prepare for a significant impact.” Related: The Eye of the Storm dome home can withstand hurricanes — and it’s officially on the market Residents have already “rushed to stores to stock up on bottled water, ramen, toilet paper and other supplies,” according to an Associated Press report. With maximum sustained winds of 155 mph and rainfall accumulations of between 10-15 inches, the storm is expected to cause flash-flooding and landslides in Hawaii. In addition, the NWS has reported the possibility of “large and potentially damaging surf.” As the hurricane continues to approach the Hawaiian coastline, many residents are hoping Lane will show a little more mercy than 1992’s Iniki, which killed six people and caused $1.8 billion worth of damage. Numerous government buildings have closed as the state’s residents prepare for the storm. Via NPR Image via Shutterstock

Read the original post: 
State of emergency in effect as Hurricane Lane barrels toward Hawaiian coastline

How stakeholders are building brilliant, resilient Hawaii infrastructure

July 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How stakeholders are building brilliant, resilient Hawaii infrastructure

The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. This episode: Hawaiian infrastructure stakeholders discuss the challenges in resilience for Hawaii.

Original post:
How stakeholders are building brilliant, resilient Hawaii infrastructure

Mount Kilauea transforms Hawaii’s coastline with the birth of a new island

July 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Mount Kilauea transforms Hawaii’s coastline with the birth of a new island

Mount Kilauea may have disappeared from the news for a while, but it isn’t done surprising us yet: the Hawaiian volcano has officially created a new island in the Pacific Ocean. Geologists working at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have reported the appearance of a tiny islet, measuring 20-30 feet in diameter, off the eastern shore of Hawaii . The new island was first seen by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) when it conducted a fly-by of the volcanic area on Friday, July 13. Records from the USGS mark the island’s inception and official birth date as July 12. As of Monday, July 16, the baby island has been declassified, forced to abandon its status after a tether to the mainland developed over the weekend. The official term for the new congealed lava structure is ‘tumulus’. Tumuli evolve as slow-moving molten lava forces newly formed crust upward. Related: Hawaii’s Kilauea is creating its own weather The most reasonable explanation for the accumulation is the overflowing of lava from the volcano’s East Rift Zone. This molten river has continued its advance into the ocean for over a month, creating a submerged segment of new-but-unstable territory that stretches almost a half-mile outwards from Hawaii’s shoreline. Other scientists attribute the new island to Fissure 8, the most active of Kilauea’s volcanic fissures. In the future, it would be no surprise to see more changes to Hawaii’s coast. Kilauea, whose name means ‘spewing’ in Hawaiian, has been continuously erupting since 1983, with records dating back to the early 1800s. In fact, Kilauea tops the charts as one of the most active volcanoes in the world despite being one of Hawaii’s youngest. The 2018 eruption marks Kilauea’s 61st official incident. Regardless of the newbie island’s complicated classification status, Hawaii will eventually boast a newer, slightly larger coastline for tourists and environmental enthusiasts to admire. In fact, many visitors have already posted selfies with the volcano on social media despite warnings against it. However, it’s safe to assume that most of us are waiting for a less perilous way to explore Hawaii’s new treasures. Perhaps a good old Google Maps update is in order? + USGS Via Earther Images via USGS

Go here to see the original:
Mount Kilauea transforms Hawaii’s coastline with the birth of a new island

Earth911 Podcast, July 16, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear

July 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Recycle

Comments Off on Earth911 Podcast, July 16, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear

Join the Earth911 gang to talk through how to recycle … The post Earth911 Podcast, July 16, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear appeared first on Earth911.com.

See the original post:
Earth911 Podcast, July 16, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear

Did Hawaii Just Ban Your Favorite Sunscreen?

July 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Did Hawaii Just Ban Your Favorite Sunscreen?

Planning a trip to Hawaii for your next vacation? You … The post Did Hawaii Just Ban Your Favorite Sunscreen? appeared first on Earth911.com.

Original post:
Did Hawaii Just Ban Your Favorite Sunscreen?

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2032 access attempts in the last 7 days.