Vegan Hanukkah recipes that everyone will enjoy

December 10, 2020 by  
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Like most holidays, food is an integral part of Hanukkah . But as is often the case at holiday celebrations, it’s easy for vegans to feel left out of the fun. Don’t despair. Genius chefs have found workarounds so that vegans can eat a plant-based rendition of everything from matzo ball soup to brisket. Here are some recipes to accompany lighting the menorah. Latkes Latkes are a Hanukkah favorite, and there are so many ways to make these small and savory fried pancakes. Potatoes are the classic main ingredient, but other grated root vegetables like sweet potatoes, carrots or even beets will also work. Instead of using egg for a binder, vegan versions mix in potato starch or flax seed. Forks Over Knives offers a healthier baked version of potato-corn latkes . Or you can really go rogue with the Minimalist Baker’s recipe for samosa potato cakes with green chutney. As the Minimalist Baker herself puts it, “Everyone knows samosas are the best appetizer, so why not make them into latkes?” Serve with applesauce and/or vegan sour cream. Related: 5 tips for a green and happy Hanukkah! Brisket What?! Vegans don’t eat brisket. Well, not really. But the handy resource group Jewish Veg has a recipe for a jackfruit-based alternative. Just add crushed tomatoes, apple cider vinegar, red wine and a few more tasty ingredients, and you’ll have a new take on the traditional meaty main dish. Kugel Kugel is usually made as an egg noodle-based dessert casserole involving eggs and sweet cream sauce. But the Unconventional Baker replaces all that egg and dairy with a cashew-based cream cheese sauce and adds raisins and apples for sweetness. Or you can turn kugel savory with this recipe from the Spruce Eats . It uses carrots, onions, zucchini and potatoes, with the flexibility to add some of your other favorites. Matzo ball soup Matzo (also spelled matzah) ball soup is one of the most famous Jewish dishes and is especially know for its connection to Passover. But Hanukkah is also an excellent time to make it. The traditional way of preparing it is to float Ashkenazi Jewish soup dumplings called matzo balls — a mixture of matzo meal, water, eggs and chicken or other fat — in chicken soup. But you can substitute a delicious veggie broth and make vegan matzo balls. This recipe from The Edgy Veg uses coconut oil and potato starch as fat and binder. Forks Over Knives’ recipe for herbed vegan matzo ball soup holds it together with cooked quinoa and flax seed. And if you’re wondering, matzo meal is mostly wheat flour. Challah Braided challah bread can still be good even without the egg coating traditionally used to make it shiny on top. Instead, you can use soy or other plant-based milk to replicate the shine. There’s even a whole class of “water challah” recipes for those who avoid eggs. Water challah is more popular in Israel , while eggy challah prevails in the U.S. The Spruce Eats gets sweet with the topping in its maple-glazed vegan water challah . You can liven your bread up with poppy seeds, too. Blintzes Blintzes are sweet, thin crepes usually filled with fruit or cheese. It’s simple enough to swap out the usual milk and eggs in the batter. This recipe from Yum Vegan Lunch Ideas fakes the cream cheese with silken tofu , plus a little vanilla, powdered sugar, lemon juice, vegan butter and apple cider vinegar. Famous vegan chef Mark Reinfeld’s recipe for blueberry blintzes is on the Jewish Veg site and includes tahini and cardamom for extra flavor. If you keep your batter basic, it’s easy to go savory instead of sweet with the fillings. Applesauce Applesauce is almost always vegan . But you don’t have to settle for a bland version straight from the jar. Check out Cookie and Kate’s recipe for applesauce with maple and cinnamon. Or spice up your store-bought applesauce with something special, whether that’s a pinch of cayenne or some pureed cranberries. Cashew sour cream Top your latkes (and everything else) with freshly made cashew sour cream. The Simple Veganista recommends soaking the cashews in two to three inches of water for a couple of hours to soften them. Then all you have to do is add water, lemon, apple cider vinegar and salt to your high-speed food processor and blast them into cream. Chocolate babka Chocolate is important to any holiday celebration, and chocolate babka is good morning, noon or night. You’ll need plenty of vegan butter to make this delicious, pull-apart dessert bread. The Domestic Gothess provides easy-to-follow pictorial directions. Sufganiyot Part of the Hanukkah story is a miracle of long-lasting oil. As Jewish vegan activist Mayim Bialik explains on PETA’s website, “Sufganiyot, or jelly doughnuts, are a traditional food eaten for Hanukkah. The holiday falls in the winter and commemorates the miracle of oil that lights the menorah in the Great Temple in Jerusalem lasting for eight days rather than one. Foods fried in oil are thus traditional for this festive winter holiday. This is a recipe I veganized, and although it is labor-intensive, the results are unbelievably delicious.” Happy Hanukkah! Images via Pixabay and Adobe Stock Images

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Vegan Hanukkah recipes that everyone will enjoy

Strategies for Waste-Free Gift Wrapping

December 9, 2020 by  
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It’s gift-giving season! With Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, winter solstice, New … The post Strategies for Waste-Free Gift Wrapping appeared first on Earth 911.

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Strategies for Waste-Free Gift Wrapping

Vegan holiday cookie recipes for every plate and palate

December 19, 2019 by  
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Any day is the perfect day to celebrate cookies, but when the holidays roll around, we really itch to get baking. Whether you’re planning to hand out cookie gift plates, donate to a bake sale or leave a treat for Santa, many people in your community will be seeking out vegan holiday cookies, so we’ve put together a list of possibilities. Get baking! Chocolate peppermint crinkles You just can’t go wrong with a combination of chocolate with peppermint all topped with sweet, powdered sugar. Besides, peppermint is a hallmark ingredient for any recipe in December. Thanks to My Darling Vegan , this recipe requires basic ingredients, so there’s no need to hit the specialty store for anything unusual. Note there is a recommended 4-hour refrigeration period, so keep that in mind if you are in a rush to make a treat for an upcoming cookie exchange. Related: How to make delicious, raw almond cranberry Christmas cookies The process for these yummy treats is pretty straight-forward. Mix the dry ingredients, mix the wet ingredients and then mix everything together. After refrigerating the dough and rolling it into balls, you’ll dip them in granulated sugar and powdered sugar. For the best results, pull them out of the oven just before they are completely cooked. This will help them stay soft. Gingerbread The season isn’t complete without gingerbread, and while you may have already decorated a gingerbread house , you can whip up a batch of these gingerbread cookies for a quick activity. No one says you have to decorate them, though, so we’re on board with turning them into drop cookies, too. These cookies might be rated as ‘intermediate’ on the vegan grocery supply list, because they do include ingredients like vegan butter and a flax egg. But if you frequently cook vegan recipes, you might already have these in the house. Check out this recipe at Loving it Vegan , which even includes a vegan frosting for decorating if you choose to do so. Tips: Make sure you don’t roll your dough too thin, and use a cookie cutter with sharp edges for the cleanest cuts. Dip your cookie cutter in flour between each use to help the dough slide out easily, and be generous in flouring your surface to keep the dough from sticking. Pumpkin sugar cookies Why decide between pumpkin cookies or sugar cookies, when you can have both? From The Minimalist Baker , these cookies are topped with a buttercream frosting enhanced with the flavors of pumpkin and warming spices. This recipe also calls for vegan butter, but there’s nothing surprising on the ingredients list. If you’re not familiar with arrowroot, it’s an alternative to cornstarch. For your milk substitute, you can use any non-dairy option you prefer . In the frosting, the pumpkin butter is optional, but really, why wouldn’t you? When it comes to making the dough, factor in some chill time, meaning that it needs to get cold in the fridge or freezer before baking. While baking, make sure to pull them from the oven right when they become a light, golden-brown color. Molasses cookies Perhaps it’s the smell of pine in the air or the thoughts of sweet treats for Santa’s arrival, but there is just something that connects molasses to Christmastime. So as the holidays approach, whip up a batch of molasses cookies for visiting guests or as a gift to conscientious co-workers. These Chewy Ginger Molasses Cookies by Making Thyme for Health offer spicy sweetness that is vegan, gluten-free and sans refined sugars. Even with all the things they are not, the ingredient list is straightforward. As an added bonus, they’ll make your house smell amazing! Chocolate chip cookies Chocolate chip is a year-round classic that everyone loves. This version from Sweet Simple Vegan includes easy-to-find ingredients and has earned high reviews. Use coconut oil as a healthier option to vegetable oils, toss in your favorite vegan chocolate chips and use whichever plant-based milk you prefer. Related: Impress loved ones with these homemade foods for holiday gifts Be sure to read the notes regarding whether to chill the dough or not. It’s optional depending on your preferred style of cookie. Oatmeal cookies This recipe from The Minimalist Baker is a mix of oatmeal with delicious fruits and optional nuts and seeds for a versatile recipe that you can make your own. Choose your favorite ingredients to suit the tastes of your friends and family. The ingredients list itself is very short, so have fun playing around with different combinations. Tips: Read through the recipe completely before getting started. It does a good job of anticipating your concerns. Is it too wet? Too sticky? Unlike many other cookies, these don’t spread out when they cook. Rugelach While many holiday cookies center around Christmas traditions, those who celebrate Hanukkah wouldn’t want to suffer through the season without the traditional rugelach on the plate. So here’s a vegan version straight from the website of Sunnyside Hanne . Enjoy! Images via Shutterstock

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Vegan holiday cookie recipes for every plate and palate

8 Green Tips for 8 Days of Hanukkah

December 12, 2017 by  
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Happy Hanukkah! Running from today, Dec. 12, to Dec. 20 … The post 8 Green Tips for 8 Days of Hanukkah appeared first on Earth911.com.

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8 Green Tips for 8 Days of Hanukkah

Vegan Hanukkah Recipe: DIY These Potato and Zucchini Latkes!

November 30, 2013 by  
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Thanksgiving may be over, but Hanukkah is still going strong! If you’re looking for delicious recipes to celebrate this eight-day festival of lights, have we got the latkes for you.  Latkes , or potato pancakes, are the ultimate Hanukkah food. Normally, this dish is fried in lots of unhealthy, artery-clogging oil, but in this adaptation with upgraded them with a couple of healthy twists. Infused with zucchini and served with apple sauce, this vegan version of Hanukkah latkes will be a crowd-pleaser eight times in a row! Follow the link below to view our easy recipe. READ MORE> Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: DIY vegan latkes , vegan food , vegan Hanukkah , vegan recipes , vegan thanksgiving        

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Vegan Hanukkah Recipe: DIY These Potato and Zucchini Latkes!

DIY Gift Idea: Spiced Citrus Pomanders

November 30, 2013 by  
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If you ask anyone which scents they associate with the holiday season , chances are that several of them will name warming spices, and citrus fruits. From gingerbread cookies to blood oranges tucked into stockings, these scents have been associated with winter celebrations for over a thousand years, and bringing these aromas into your home with scented decorations is both easy and fun to do. The type of pomanders that I’ll be describing below have been used as ornaments since the 14th century, and work as well in modern homes as they do alongside rustic, vintage decor. Read the rest of DIY Gift Idea: Spiced Citrus Pomanders Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: citrus , cloves , DIY , holiday crafts , holiday decorating , Orange , ornaments , Pomander , ribbon        

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DIY Gift Idea: Spiced Citrus Pomanders

How To Make Vegan Baked Potato and Zucchini Latkes

December 9, 2012 by  
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Latkes, or potato pancakes, are a staple of Hanukkah, but they’re great for any occasion. Most latkes are fried in oil, so using an adapted recipe from bloggers  Meet the Shannons  (makers of  these amazing vegan Tagalongs ) to include zucchini, we came up with a tasty baked potato pancake recipe that you can snack on guilt-free. Whether you’ll be lighting a menorah or not this season, follow our simple recipe and bake up a batch of vegan latkes and serve them with applesauce! READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: applesauce , baked potato pancakes , hanukkah , Hanukkah recipes , healthy food , organic food , Potato latkas , potato pancakes , recipes , vegan recipes , vegetarian recipes , zucchini latkes

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Atlanta Museum Offers Free IMAX Ticket for Recycling Your Cell Phone

December 28, 2009 by  
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Not only do millions of cell phones end up in landfills each year, but those old phones contain a number of toxins , like arsenic and lead, which need to be disposed of properly to avoid contaminating the environment.

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Atlanta Museum Offers Free IMAX Ticket for Recycling Your Cell Phone

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