LEED-certified ‘Cocoon House’ has colored skylights that create rainbows inside the home

October 31, 2019 by  
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The Hamptons have long been known as a summertime haven for busy New Yorkers, and one architect has created a personal retreat that pays homage to the region’s vernacular in a very unique way. Nina Edwards Anker of nea studio has unveiled the Cocoon House, a gorgeous, LEED-certified family home that is “cocooned” into a curvaceous shell, where colorful skylights reflect rainbows throughout the interior. Located on the coast of Southampton, New York, the Cocoon House is a curved volume clad in cedar shingles. The unique design is reminiscent of the local pool cottages found throughout the Hamptons but with a modern twist. The best part? The home is a powerhouse of energy efficiency . Related: LEED Gold home celebrates Utah’s brilliant light and beauty The northern side of the home is covered with shimmering cedar shingles , creating a sense of privacy, while the southern side features an impressive 65 feet of continuous sliding glass doors, providing unobstructed views of the pristine landscape. Topping the inner curve of the home is a series of multicolored skylights angled to reflect light and create a vibrant stream of fun, rainbow hues throughout the interior. According to the studio, the tints on the bold skylights were inspired by Goethe’s theories on color. “The colors range from vermilion red, which signals sunset and rest, above the master bedroom, to deep yellow, which signals zenith and activity, nearest the living room,” the team explained. At either end of the home, rounded windows provide stunning views from the open living area on one side and the master bedroom on the other. In between both areas, the interior design is just as impressive as the home’s exterior. The furnishings, many created by Anker herself, are contemporary with plenty of whimsy, such as the origami-like wicker settee and twinkling chandeliers. Besides its breathtaking aesthetic, the home is also LEED-certified thanks to several energy-efficient and sustainable features. Solar panels power the home. Thick and heavily insulated walls retain heat while the transparent side lets in optimal natural light and air circulation. Adding to its strong thermal mass, all of the home’s doors and windows are Passivehaus-certified. Even the swimming pool, which is able to collect and filter rainwater, adds to the home’s efficiency. + nea studio Photography by Caylon Hackwith via nea studio

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LEED-certified ‘Cocoon House’ has colored skylights that create rainbows inside the home

Prefab alpine shelter boasts phenomenal views and a small footprint

October 31, 2019 by  
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On the border between Italy and France, a new alpine shelter with breathtaking views has been gently placed atop a remote landscape. Paolo Carradini and his family tapped Michele Versaci and Andrea Cassi to craft an all-black mountain hut to honor the memory of their son, Matteo, a passionate mountaineer. Named the Bivacco Matteo Corradini, the sculptural dwelling was prefabricated off-site in modules, transported by helicopter and reassembled on the construction site to minimize site impact. Located a few meters from the Dormillouse summit in the upper Valle di Susa, the Bivacco Matteo Corradini — also known as the black body mountain shelter — is placed at an altitude of nearly 3,000 meters. The hexagonal dwelling is wrapped in a black metal shell engineered to protect the alpine building from extreme weather conditions, shed snow and absorb solar radiation, while insulation ensures comfort in both winter and summer. Its angular form also takes inspiration from the landscape and mimics the shape of a dark boulder. The interior is constructed from Swiss pine , a material valued for its malleability and scent that is typically used in Alpine communities for crafting cradles and surfaces in bedrooms. The compact interior is organized around a central table with three large wooden steps on either side. These steps serve as sleeping platforms at night and function as seating during the day. Two large windows frame views of the outdoors and funnel light into the structure.  Related: This Norwegian alpine cabin fits together like a 3D timber puzzle “The volume rests on the ground for a quarter of its lower surface so as to adapt to the slope, while limiting soil consumption,” explain the designers of the prefab shelter in a press release. “Reversibility and environmental sustainability are key points of the project: a light and low-impact installation. The optimization of weights and shapes made assembly at high altitudes quick and easy and minimized helicopter transport.” + Andrea Cassi + Michele Versaci Images via Andrea Cassi and Michele Versaci

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Prefab alpine shelter boasts phenomenal views and a small footprint

Hamptons home built with salvaged materials marries luxury and sustainability

August 9, 2016 by  
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The 3,800-square-foot residence sits on a 160-acre reserve located in between Gardiner’s Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Part of one of the seaside communities of the Hamptons, the house draws from the region’s rural architecture, but accommodates all the needs of the 21st century homeowner. Related: Resolution 4’s gorgeous Swingline home brings sophisticated prefab to the Hamptons It features foot vaulted ceilings incorporating wooden beams made from salvaged pine, and large glass doors opening towards a swimming pool with a pool house and 2,500 square feet of decking. The folding doors connect the swimming pool with the kitchen and dining area nestled under a vaulted ceiling . The rest of the ground floor accommodates the living room and a pair of bedrooms, while the master and two other bedrooms occupy the first floor. One of the most noticeable features of the house is the luxury finishing-white oak flooring and grey marble in the bathrooms and kitchen countertops. + Studio Zung

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Hamptons home built with salvaged materials marries luxury and sustainability

Hyperloop One plans an underwater version of supersonic tube transportation

August 9, 2016 by  
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Imagine the Port of Los Angeles moved 10 miles off shore with ships docking at floating stations and cargo containers transported underwater from the coast via supersonic tubes. The coastal areas where the Port of Los Angeles used to take up miles of space has been transformed into parks, residential areas, office complexes and beaches. That is the future envisioned by L.A.-based startup Hyperloop One that is developing the technology to realize Elon Musk’s dream of moving passengers and cargo at supersonic speeds through evacuated steel tubes. “We’ve been talking to a lot of the port authorities around the world about re-engineering their ports in this kind of fashion,” Peter Diamandis, a Hyperloop One board member and CEO of the X-Prize Foundation, told Business Insider . He said clearing the land along the coast could create the conditions for a “huge real estate boom.” Diamandis said that in Long Beach, near where he lives, there is a “beautiful California coastline that is basically covered with ports or cargo containers and ships. Imagine if you could regain all of that coastline for parks and homes and beaches by taking the port and putting the port 10 miles off shore.” Related: Hyperloop One opens the world’s first Hyperloop factory Diamandis also confirmed to Business Insider that Hyperloop One is discussing underwater passenger travel. He said that there have been proposals to transport passengers underwater between Norway and Sweden. Hyperloop One is also involved in a partnership with a Russian company to build a Hyperloop in Moscow and possibly beyond and is exploring the possibility of a route between the Finnish capital, Helsinki, and the Swedish capital, Stockholm. On May 11, Hyperloop One conducted the first live trial of the technology at a test site in the Nevada desert about 10 miles north of Las Vegas. The Propulsion Open Air Test (POAT) involved a sled that was propeled by electromagnets to a top speed of 115 mph (185 km/h) along a track measuring 1,500 feet (457 meters) long. + Hyperloop One Via New Atlas Images via Hyperloop One

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