One-of-a-kind Wilhelm Lamp is 3D-printed from recycled polycarbonate

April 12, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Challenged by Milanese design gallerist Rossana Orlandi to “give plastic a second life,” Italian architect Tiziano Vudafieri has created the Wilhelm Lamp, a unique light fixture and tribute to the renowned German industrial designer Wilhelm Wagenfeld. Presented at Rossana Orlandi’s exhibition Guitlessplastic – Master’s Pieces during Milan Design Week, the Wilhelm Lamp reinterprets the Wagenfeld’s modernist glass vase as an enlarged pendant lamp that is 3D-printed from recycled polycarbonate. First launched last year, Rossana Orlandi’s Guitlessplastic project was created to challenge the public discourse around plastic. The initiative has included talks and numerous collaborations between brands, artists and architects invited to showcase responsible uses of plastic through recycling. The Guitlessplastic – Master’s Pieces collection exhibits unique works made out of recycled and recyclable plastic by renowned artists, designers and architects and is currently on show at the Railway Pavilion of the Museum Scienza e Tecnologia Leonardo da Vinci in Milan until April 14. As an admirer of Wilhelm Wagenfeld, Tiziano Vudafieri owns a 1935 Wagenfield glass vase as part of his personal collection and used it as the inspiration for the Wilhelm Lamp. Created in collaboration with BAOLAB, LATI and GIMAC, the lamp was 3D-printed into a large, bulbous shape from recycled polycarbonate , a material that boasts high thermal and mechanical resistance. At the exhibition, the translucent pendant lamp is suspended above the 1935 Wagenfeld vase, which is bathed in the lamp’s light. Related: Make your own custom sunglasses from recycled plastic with FOS “Wilhelm Wagenfeld was the only Bauhaus master to apply this movement’s utopia to real life, invading the market after World War II with beautiful everyday objects with innovative designs and affordable prices,” Vudafieri said. “Among his works, I prefer his glass pieces, particularly the vases, with their classic and rigorous, elegant and modern forms. Hence the idea of recycling not only the materials used for the object, but also the design itself, fitting in perfectly with the Guiltless Plastic theme.” + Tiziano Vudafieri Images via Tiziano Vudafieri

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One-of-a-kind Wilhelm Lamp is 3D-printed from recycled polycarbonate

This camper van features not just one, but two sleeping pods in its cozy interior

April 12, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

While most DIY van conversions end up as just one project, Oxford-based Jack Richens and Lucy Hedges took their passion for transforming camper vans into contemporary homes on wheels and turned it into a career. Their company, This Moving House , has just finished its sixth project, the Jubel Explorer, and it is a doozy. The ultra-compact space has been completely transformed into a chic adventuring vehicle, complete with two innovative sleeping nooks. Constructed on a long wheel base Mercedes Benz Sprinter, the camper van ‘s revamped interior is surprisingly modern and space-efficient. At the front of the van, the driving area has two chairs that swivel around to face a small table with a three-person bench, creating enough space for dining or working. Related: Denver-based company helps you fulfill your van conversion dreams But at the heart of this incredible tiny home on wheels is the kitchen and sleeping space. Although incredibly compact, the kitchen is contemporary thanks to a palette of matte white with wooden trim. A white resin sink sits in front of a light-gray backsplash with a two-burner stove on one side and a countertop on the other. For additional preparation space, larger countertop panels folds out from the cabinetry. Next to the quaint cooking area is a day bed tucked into the very end of the camper van. Beside this bed, a simple staircase leads up to the company’s now-signature pod bunks. Accessed by porthole-style windows, the sleeping pods come complete with fixed full-sized mattress and reading lights as well as the possibility for tailored furnishings, such as a custom mattress and privacy curtains. To keep the space clutter-free, the camper van is outfitted with plenty of storage. The stairs to the sleeping pods lift up to reveal built-in nooks, and the main bed has pull-out drawers underneath. For additional storage, there is an extra-large drawer and room for gear in the back of the van. The Jubel Explorer was also made to be semi- off-grid  with a diesel heater that keeps the interior space warm and cozy. Power comes from a 110AH and 12V electrical system, and the van also comes with a 21-gallon water tank. + This Moving House Via Curbed Photography by Tim Hall Photography via This Moving House

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This camper van features not just one, but two sleeping pods in its cozy interior

A 1920s cottage gets a new lease on life as an urban barnyard house

April 12, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

When a family of four outgrew their 1920s cottage in Melbourne and were about to embark on an extensive renovation, they asked Australian design studio Inbetween Architecture for a second opinion on the blueprints. Impressed by the consultation, the clients ended up scrapping their plans and instead put their faith in Inbetween Architecture to lead the redesign, one which would be more sensitive to the family’s lifestyle — and their chickens and honey bees. Affectionately called the “Urban Barnyard House,” the renovated and expanded residence combines rustic influences with contemporary elements into a comfortable home for the family and their beloved animals. Before expanding the original house, a two-bedroom Edwardian weatherboard cottage, the architects first sat down with the family to understand their daily routines and needs so as to create a responsive and flexible design solution. The clients’ answers informed the layout of the Urban Barnyard House. For example, the kitchen is placed in the heart of the home and the dining area is located to the east to take advantage of morning light as well as the embrace of indoor-outdoor living . The existing building was reconfigured to house three bedrooms and a new entry hall while the communal areas were relocated to the new rear extension. To minimize the time the family had to spend outside the home during renovation and construction, the architects built the extension with simple construction and a truss roof and also added a small “link” space that serves as a transition zone from the existing structure to the new building. An outdoor deck was inserted between the new extension and an existing timber shed in the south side of the property. Large windows and a natural materials palette tie the house to the landscape, which includes a productive urban backyard for beekeeping and raising chickens. Related: Modern farmhouse-inspired dwelling in Melbourne is largely self-sufficient “Free and easy indoor-outdoor living (and a productive urban backyard!) suggested that while the home needed to be robust, there was an element of playfulness that could be accommodated,” said the architects, who designed the home with humans and animals in mind. “The contemporary extension sits comfortably within its more traditional context. Sentimental elements of the original house, such as the fireplace bricks, solid timber paneled doors and a stained glass window, were salvaged and reused in new locations.” + Inbetween Architecture Via ArchDaily Photography by Nic Granleese via Inbetween Architecture

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A 1920s cottage gets a new lease on life as an urban barnyard house

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