Dreamy cabin harvests rainwater and natural light for a minimal carbon footprint

January 8, 2018 by  
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Nevada-based INCLINEDESIGN proves sustainable design can be beautiful in this dreamy timber cabin on Lopez Island, Washington. Available in the summer as a vacation rental, the Barn Gallery guesthouse is a showcase of eco-friendly design – from its use of reclaimed timber and metal to its elegantly crafted rainwater catchment system. Surrounded by four acres of woodland and private meadow, the guesthouse faces southwest for views of a secluded waterfront bluff. The Barn Gallery project began as a “deconstruction” of a 1970s-era home, with the designers recycling materials where possible while retaining the original building footprint. The new home’s untreated timber siding was reclaimed from the original home’s floor joists, which were milled from trees felled on the property in 1970. Corten steel frames the single-pitched roof and walls and reclaimed metal components compliment the timber palette that will naturally develop a silvery patina over time. The light-filled interior is modern and minimalist with custom artistic touches like the unique sandblasted shower glass and the copper towel warmers plumbed inline with the in-floor hot water pipes. Reclaimed timber can also be seen indoors in the form of new custom furnishings. Per its name, Barn Gallery regularly hosts rotating art exhibits featuring local artists. Related: Rammed-charcoal home is a handsome oasis between the trees To keep energy use to a minimum, the designers installed smart energy monitoring, a structural insulated panel roof, and underfloor radiant heating with heat recovery ventilation and heat pump technologies. A solar array was omitted due to budget. Rainwater is captured and filtered on-site through a rain garden and is also harvested in a large timber-clad rain barrel. + INCLINEDESIGN Via Dwell Images by Steve Horn

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Dreamy cabin harvests rainwater and natural light for a minimal carbon footprint

Salvaged wood clads handsome mountain cabin in Vermont

April 7, 2017 by  
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This handsome timber cabin nestled in the foothills of Vermont’s Green Mountains stands out from the pack with its asymmetrical roofs and weathered, recycled timber cladding. Richmond-based Birdseye Design designed Woodshed, a cabin that infuses contemporary elements into the traditional woodshed vernacular. The cabin’s Douglas fir and pine cladding were repurposed from snow fencing and horse corrals. Set on a clearing on a steeply sloping and heavily wooded site, the Woodshed in Pomfret blends into its forested surroundings with its timber-clad facade. Conceived as a guesthouse and entertainment space for the main residence down the road, the residential project takes cues from the iconic woodshed found in the Vermont landscape. The main building comprises two asymmetric gabled roof volumes connected via a central entryway. A small auxiliary garage sits off to the side. Related: Origami-like alpine cabin brings contemporary style to Chile’s mountains “The western, public elevation presents the continuous, wood textured wall that evokes the expressive, scrim wall of a traditional woodshed,” write the architects. “The project purposefully projects a minimal familiar elevation to the non-view, public street side and an engaging, contemporary open elevation to the private hillside.” Large expanses of glazing wrap around the east facade to frame views of the landscape. Exterior terraces expand the footprint of the home to the outdoors. + Birdseye Design Via ArchDaily Images via Birdseye Design

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Salvaged wood clads handsome mountain cabin in Vermont

Thousands of grafted flowers grow on the entire face of this Milan building

April 7, 2017 by  
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A stunning show for the eyes—and nose—has taken over the facade of a building in Milan . Local design studio Piuarch teamed up with landscape architect Cornelius Gavril to create ‘Flowerprint,’ a gardening facade installation with 2,000 aromatic flowers and herbs grafted onto tubers. The plants, which range from roses and lilies to thyme and lavender, create a multicolored “flower embroidery” exploring a new multi-sensory way of decorating surfaces. Created for Brera Design Week in Milan, Flowerprint is a temporary gardening facade installed on the facade of the building where Piuarch is located in the courtyard of Via Palermo 5. The constellation of flowers comprises 200 vertical lines of 2,000 suspended plants to cover the entirety of the 10-meter-tall and 20-meter-wide building facade from ground to roof. “The flowered wall uses the different varieties in their colour and material condition to create a pattern, a sort of actual floral graphism, in three dimensions: olfactory, material and in constant transformation depending on light and humidity conditions,” writes Piuarch. Related: ‘Kinetic’ rooftop garden uses pallets and plants to create the illusion of movement To extend the lifespan of the cut flowers, the designers grafted the plants onto potato plants using an ancient technique. The potato plants provide a structural basis and nutrients to the flowers. The fragrance of the flowers and aromatic herbs are enhanced with natural outdoor perfumes produced by Adar. Flowerprint is on display from April 4 to April 9, 2017. + Piuarch

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Thousands of grafted flowers grow on the entire face of this Milan building

Walker Workshop Expands a 1940s Barn Into a Contemporary Wood-Clad Guesthouse

November 11, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Walker Workshop Expands a 1940s Barn Into a Contemporary Wood-Clad Guesthouse Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: barn , beverley hills , concert hall , Contemporary Home , converted barn , fire-resistant timber , floor to ceiling glass , floor to ceiling windows , guesthouse , Los Angeles , natural light , Oak Pass Guesthouse , polished concrete , timber planks , Walker Workshop

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Walker Workshop Expands a 1940s Barn Into a Contemporary Wood-Clad Guesthouse

Nomad Living by Studio ArTe is a Colorful Container Guesthouse in Southern Portugal

May 13, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Nomad Living by Studio ArTe is a Colorful Container Guesthouse in Southern Portugal Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: full-length sliding glass doors , green design Portugal , Nomad Living Container Guesthouse by Studio ArTe , Nomad Living guesthouse by Arnold Aarssen , portugal , recycled shipping container , repurposed shipping container , shipping container home , shipping container homes in Portugal

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Nomad Living by Studio ArTe is a Colorful Container Guesthouse in Southern Portugal

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