Solar-powered Farm From a Box is a compact farm kit that feeds 150 people

December 28, 2016 by  
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Two acres of land is enough to farm a sustainable food supply for as many as 150 people, and now a San Francisco startup is making it even easier to get that farm growing. Farm From a Box is a shipping container kit that holds all the essentials for setting up a two-acre farm (except the land, of course). Founders Brandi DeCarli and Scott Thompson got the idea after working on a youth center in Kenya where shipping containers were being used to substitute where infrastructure lacked. That project didn’t address food insecurity , though, which led DeCarli and Thompson to found their own venture specifically for that purpose. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlcijvWRJGU Farm From a Box is a kit designed to make it easier for all types of organizations to start growing sustainable food . Nonprofit humanitarian agencies, schools, community groups, and even individuals can buy a $50,000 kit, which comes with a complete water system including a solar-powered pump and drip irrigation system. Together, those features help conserve water by using it more efficiently, delivering water directly to the roots of growing plants. All of the kit’s components are solar-powered, so the kit also includes 3 kW of solar energy capacity which is enough to power the water pump as well as WiFi connectivity that makes it possible to monitor the farm conditions remotely. Because the built-in solar power technology generates more than enough energy to power the farm’s equipment, the farm is suitable to run completely off the grid. Related: Top 10 cities in the US for urban farming All the prospective farmer needs to have is viable land, of course, and seeds. Luckily, the Farm From a Box team realizes that farming is largely about skill and science, so the kit also includes three stages of training materials on sustainable farming, farm technology and maintenance, as well as the business of farming. In a recent interview with Smithsonian Magazine, DiCarli explained that the farm kit was designed to “act as a template” and that it’s possible to “plug in” components that specifically fit the farm’s local climate and the farmers’ needs. Those options include internal cold storage, to help preserve crops between harvest and consumption or sale, and a water purification system, if needed. So far, Farm From a Box has deployed one prototype at Shone Farm in Sonoma County, California. A project of Santa Rosa Junior College, the farm is part of a larger outdoor laboratory in which students learn how to cultivate crops in drought conditions, and then the harvest is used to supply the farm’s own community-supported agriculture (CSA) program as well as the college’s culinary arts program. DiCarli said the Shone Farm prototype turned out to be “more efficient than we had even planned,” with “really high” production and energy output. Farm From a Box has a number of other potential sites lined up already, in Ethiopia, Nepal, Bhutan, and Afghanistan, as well as additional test farms in California and a veteran-partnered site in Virginia. Via Smithsonian Magazine Images via Farm From a Box

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Solar-powered Farm From a Box is a compact farm kit that feeds 150 people

Astronauts are munching on lettuce grown in space for the first time ever

August 10, 2015 by  
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Click here to view the embedded video. In what feels like a moment right out of Star Trek , members of the Expedition 44 crew on the International Space Station are about to eat the very first crops grown in space . Today, a batch of red romaine lettuce will be harvested from the “Veggie” plant growth system on the ISS orbiting laboratory  to make a tasty space salad for the crew. Scientists hope that the fresh food will be not only more nutritious for the astronauts, but that it will also improve their moods and maybe even help protect from harmful radiation. Read the rest of Astronauts are munching on lettuce grown in space for the first time ever

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Astronauts are munching on lettuce grown in space for the first time ever

Salt-grown potatoes could revolutionize crop production

January 12, 2015 by  
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Common knowledge dictates that most food plants can’t grow in areas fed by salty sea water. But a group of researchers in the Netherlands has found that perhaps that isn’t necessarily the case. Those researchers discovered that the humble potato can not only survive, but thrive in salty soil, and it could spell a food revolution . Read the rest of Salt-grown potatoes could revolutionize crop production Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: food production in unsuitable areas , growing food in salty soil , Netherlands research , potatoes grown in salty soil , saline crops , salt crops , salt food , salt potatoes , salt water potatoes , salty soil , salty soil food production , salty water crops

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Salt-grown potatoes could revolutionize crop production

Grow Up! Designing Vertical Gardens for Tiny Spaces

March 5, 2014 by  
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If you’re one of the many people in the northern hemisphere who are counting down the days ’til springtime, chances are you may have also been daydreaming about gardening as well. March isn’t just one of the coldest months of the year—it’s also the month in which seed catalogs are sent out to green-thumbed folks everywhere, so plans can be made and plots can be mapped out in preparation for the luscious growing season ahead. If you happen to be lacking in yard space , there’s no need to feel left out! There are some brilliant ways to take full advantage of small spaces, and the key is to plant vertically. Read the rest of Grow Up! Designing Vertical Gardens for Tiny Spaces Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: beans , bottle planter , climbing beans , climbing food plants , climbing plants , cucumbers , DIY garden , edible climbers , gourds , growing food , hanging garden , hanging herbs , herbs , lettuce , pallet , pallet garden , peas , pole beans , small space gardening , squash , tomatoes , urban gardening , vegetable gardening , vegetables , vertical garden , vertical gardening        

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Grow Up! Designing Vertical Gardens for Tiny Spaces

The planTree Hydroponic Cultivator Helps Households Grow Organic Food Indoors

October 23, 2013 by  
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Designed by  Nur Y?ld?r?m  for the kitchens of  the future, planTree is a hydroponic based system that allows homes to grow organic food from seed. The system uses automatic water and nutrition circulation to reduce the need for maintenance and plant care, and vertically combined modules provide space efficiency and flexibility. A simple interface also lets users set up values such as pH, moisture and light for optimum growing. By allowing people to grow the vegetables and greens at home, planTree promotes a greener lifestyle while contributing to the health of living spaces. planTree was honored in International Design Awards 2011 with Silver Award in Kitchen Appliances Student Category. + Nur Y?ld?r?m The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: growing food at home , Hydroponic Cultivator , hydroponics , planTree , urban gardening , urban gardens        

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British Columbia Man Faces Six Months in Jail for Growing Food

July 12, 2011 by  
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Image: Dirk Becker Last week Colleen brought us the story of a woman in Michigan who is facing jail time for planting a garden. Sadly, this type of heavy-handed by-the-letter enforcement of bylaws exists at the same time as people embrace urban agriculture as a viable source of high quality nutrition. A man in Lanztville, British Columbia is facing a similar battle with the local government after converting his 2.5 acre “residential” lot from a gravel pit into a thriving organic farm.

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British Columbia Man Faces Six Months in Jail for Growing Food

Growing Food, and Community, in the Desert

December 20, 2009 by  
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Alissa J. Novoselick’s students bonded over their shared love of chilies. Photo by nattu via Flickr.

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Growing Food, and Community, in the Desert

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