Climate twins: which city will your city feel like in 2080?

February 18, 2019 by  
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The phrase “global warming” gets tossed around a lot, but do we really understand what it means and how it will feel? In the groundbreaking Paris Agreement, 195 countries agreed to limit global warming to 2 degrees Celsius — but how will those 2 degrees really affect our lives? A new study in Nature links 540 U.S. cities to other cities with a current climate that is similar to how those cities will feel in 60 years. As CityLab’s Robinson Meyer explained , the study takes each city and finds “the city whose modern-day weather gives the best clue to what conditions will feel like in 2080.” The researchers’ goal is to translate what abstract climate science and meteorological changes really mean for people by making them understandable in a modern — and personal — context. For example, Philadelphia will feel more like Memphis in 2080. That equates to summer days that are warmer by an average of 7 degrees Fahrenheit, and winters that are warmer by 10 degrees. Memphis, on the other hand, will feel more like College Station, Texas.  Use this web tool to find your city’s ‘climate twin’. The ‘Arkansas-ification’ of U.S. cities “Every place is getting warmer and many are getting drier,” Matthew Fitzpatrick, author of the study, told CityLab. In fact, most cities’ future climate twin is approximately 500 miles farther south and toward the middle of the country. “In the Northeast, you can envision the future as one big Arkansasification,” Fitzpatrick explained. For those who haven’t been to Arkansas, the authors explained that means more humid, subtropical climates typical of the southeast and Midwest. Western cities, however, will start to feel more like the desert conditions of Southern California and the southwest. The cities selected in the study cover 250 million urban Americans. By using a method called climate analog mapping, the authors used different emission scenarios and weather predictions to find all similar cities, and then narrowed down the options to find the best match based on statistical and topographical similarities. The 540 cities selected were those that had the strongest match and the most relatable “twin.” A lot can happen in 60 years, and most are still hopeful that we can make changes to curb climate change. The authors used different examples of carbon emission rates, called Representative Concentration Pathways, to compare the results based on our best- and worst-case scenarios. For example, if progressive policies are put in place soon to curtail carbon emissions, Washington D.C. might feel like Paragould, Arkansas by 2080. If mitigation policies are not put into place, however, D.C. will become more like Greenwood, Mississippi — an additional 200 miles south. D.C. residents are already familiar with hot, humid summers in the low-lying capitol, so the news that their children will face even stickier summers is lamentably relatable. Though the matches aren’t perfect, the authors explained they do give modern-day examples that make abstract climate change realistic and easier to understand. Climate change puts cities at risk Cities are especially vulnerable to climate change, with rapidly increasing populations, urban sprawl, aging infrastructure and limited budgets for forward-thinking climate adaptation. In New York City , where heat island effect (the intensification of heat by concrete, urban environments) is already a major problem, the thought of becoming Jonesboro, Arkansas is daunting. Imagine a stifling hot, underground subway platform well above 85 degrees in July with no breeze. Now add an average of 9 degrees Fahrenheit. Related: Reimagine a resilient future for your city with this nature-based tool But human discomfort isn’t the only problem. These shifts in climate also affect other species. Migratory bird patterns are already changing but so are insect populations . Increased humidity, flooding and temperatures cause an uptick in mosquitoes, ticks and flies. This means an increase in diseases such as zika and dengue that were previously contained to fewer states. Winter freezes that used to kill off larva may no longer be cold enough to have the same population-controlling effect. Climate changes we can understand For most urban dwellers, this alarming news of hotter days and health consequences is not new. However, the authors of the study are hopeful that these results help people conceptualize climate change and make discussions more relatable. Their assessment is “place-based” and aims to use cities that are familiar. Many people have visited these cities, know about them or at the very least have an idea what the weather in their future “twin” city is like compared to where they live. Framing the discussion about climate impacts in a way that is understandable — and in some cases so real you can almost feel it — is critical. Hopefully, these terms and tools help people understand the urgency at a global scale in terms that are meaningful at a personal level. Via CityLab Image via Pixabay

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Climate twins: which city will your city feel like in 2080?

World’s first commercial carbon-sucking plant goes live in Zurich

May 31, 2017 by  
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Carbon capture is essential to the fight against climate change and keeping temperatures below a two-degree-Celsius increase, according to Swiss-based Climeworks . For a few years now they’ve been working on technology to suck carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air and sell it to agriculture or energy industries for reuse. And now they’ve finally switched on the final product – the world’s first Direct Air Capture (DAC) commercial plant on top of a waste recovery facility in Zurich, Switzerland . Atop a municipal-run waste incineration facility in Zurich, Climeworks installed their DAC plant, which is comprised of three stacked shipping containers with six carbon collectors. Fans suck ambient air into the collectors, and a filter takes in CO2. Waste heat will power the groundbreaking plant. Climeworks will send the captured CO2 to a greenhouse – every single year they’ll be able to supply 900 metric tons. They’ll be able to continuously supply the CO2 to the greenhouse via an underground pipeline. Related: The world’s first carbon capture plant can convert CO2 into usable energy In a statement, managing director and co-founder Christoph Gebald said, “Highly scalable negative emission technologies are crucial if we are to stay below the two degree target of the international community.” And the CO2 won’t go to waste. Greenhouses aren’t the only entities that can utilize CO2; it could carbonate drinks or become carbon-neutral hydrocarbon fuel. The automotive and food industries could benefit from the CO2 Climeworks captures. Their ultimate goal is to capture one percent of all carbon emissions in the world by 2025. To do that, co-founder and director Jan Wurzbacher estimates they’ll need to install 750,000 shipping containers filled with their C02 collectors. He says that is the same amount of shipping containers that pass through the harbor in Shanghai during a two week period, so it’s a target the global economy could handle. Climeworks says their modular plants could be deployed just about anywhere. + Climeworks Via Climeworks and Fast Company Images via screenshot and Climeworks Facebook

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The Future of the Built Environment is 3D Printed

May 28, 2014 by  
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The future of the built environment is 3D printed, as California’s Bot Laboratory proves with this groundbreaking piece. Showcased at the Maker Fair 2014, the m_Wall was printed in only two pieces and stands over 6 feet 4 inches tall. Printed with the Euclid Robot 3D printer using both black and clear ABS plastic, the m_Wall is extremely strong with a single pass print thickness of over 1/4 inch (6.35mm). Architectural pieces need to be created with less expensive methods than “traditional” 3D printing, and the m_Wall proves that doing so is economically feasible by using inexpensive plastic pellets and high-speed production. Read the rest of The Future of the Built Environment is 3D Printed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3D , 3d printed , 3D printed wall , 3D printing , Bot Laboratory , grasshopper , Grasshopper 3D , m_Wall , Zachary Schoch

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Massive Dose of Measles Vaccine Defeats Blood Cancer in Groundbreaking Mayo Clinic Experiment

May 16, 2014 by  
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In an experimental trial at Mayo Clinic , doctors used a massive dose of the measles vaccine to treat a 50-year old woman suffering from blood cancer. According to a report from the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings , the dosage of vaccine was enough to treat 10 million people! And it seems to have worked. Read the rest of Massive Dose of Measles Vaccine Defeats Blood Cancer in Groundbreaking Mayo Clinic Experiment Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: blood cancer , blood cancer treatment , cancer treatment , Mayo Clinic , mayo clinic journal , measles vaccination , measles vaccine , measles vaccine defeats cancer

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Massive Dose of Measles Vaccine Defeats Blood Cancer in Groundbreaking Mayo Clinic Experiment

Foster + Partners Unveils Istanbul’s First Apple Store

May 16, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Foster + Partners Unveils Istanbul’s First Apple Store Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: apple store architects istanbul , Apple store design , Architecture , Foster + Partners , Istanbul Apple Store , istanbul architecture , Istanbul’s Zorlu Centre , Norman Foster design , retail architecture , retail design , Urban design

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Foster + Partners Unveils Istanbul’s First Apple Store

GREEN BUILDING 101: Water Efficiency, Both Inside and Outside the Home

May 16, 2014 by  
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There are few things we take for granted as much as our ability to turn on the tap and get water in a seemingly endless supply. Even during droughts, and despite warnings about shortages and conservation, most of us treat this precious resource as a given. The average American uses 80-100 gallons of water per day, and while less than half of that will be used for cooking or drinking, chances are that all of it is treated, potable water from the municipal provider. What many people don’t realize is that it’s fairly easy to implement systems for recycling and reusing water on your own property, thereby decreasing the demands on shared supplies, and reducing your water bills. Read on for details on the three LEED-H criteria for water efficiency at home, plus additional info on wastewater treatment and reuse. Read the rest of GREEN BUILDING 101: Water Efficiency, Both Inside and Outside the Home Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “water collection” , catchment , cisterns , Design , ecology , Environment , garden , Green Building 101 , green roof , green roofs , home , irrigation , landscape , plants , rain catchment , rainfall , rainwater , rainwater catchment , runoff , shower head , showerhead , showerheads , showers , sprinkler , water conservation , water efficiency , water issues , water treatment , water-wise

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3D-Printed Canal House Pops Up in Amsterdam, May Start New Housing Trend

May 16, 2014 by  
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When DUS Architects announced plans last year to 3D print an entire canal house , the design world was skeptical. But all skepticism vanished recently when they unveiled the first 3D-printed walls to the public in Amsterdam. During the unveiling, the firm showcased a set of 3D printed plastic pieces that will lock together to build the canal home’s façade. In addition to demonstrating the possibilities of 3D printing with different materials, the project provides a tangible example of the next-generation technology that may well spur a whole new housing trend. Read the rest of 3D-Printed Canal House Pops Up in Amsterdam, May Start New Housing Trend Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d Printed canal house , Canal House , dus architects , DUS Architects Canal House , eco design , first 3d-printed house , giant 3d printer , green design , KamerMaker , room builder printer , sustainable design

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3D-Printed Canal House Pops Up in Amsterdam, May Start New Housing Trend

Bio-artist Joe Davis to Build a Genetically Modified ‘Tree of Knowledge’ With Wikipedia Pages

May 16, 2014 by  
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Bio-artist Joe Davis plans to place 50,000 of the most popular Wikipedia pages into the DNA of apple trees to create a genetically modified Tree of Knowledge. Called Malus ecclesia , the project is part of Davis’ art residency at the genetics lab run by George Church at Harvard Medical School. Read the rest of Bio-artist Joe Davis to Build a Genetically Modified ‘Tree of Knowledge’ With Wikipedia Pages Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: apples , Art , bio-artist , DNA , Forbidden fruit , genetic modification , genetically modified food , genetics , harvard medical school , Joe Davis , Malus ecclesia , Tree of Knowledge , wikipedia

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Bio-artist Joe Davis to Build a Genetically Modified ‘Tree of Knowledge’ With Wikipedia Pages

Construction on Groundbreaking Green-Roofed SET Building Commences in Amsterdam

November 5, 2013 by  
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Construction on MOPET’s new technical SET-Building (Signal, Energy and Telecom) has commenced in Amsterdam’s rapidly developing business district, the Zuidas. Scheduled for completion in 2014, the low-lying, green-roofed building will provide traction and energy for the city’s new subway line, the Noord-Zuidlijn, which will join the northern and southern parts of the city by tunneling under the river IJ. Read the rest of Construction on Groundbreaking Green-Roofed SET Building Commences in Amsterdam Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: amsterdam architecture , Amsterdam buildngs , construction breaks ground on SET building , dutch design , green buildings in Amsterdam , green-roofed buildings in Amsterdam , green-roofed SET building , Mopet , Noord-Zuidlijn , SET building , Zuid-as        

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Construction on Groundbreaking Green-Roofed SET Building Commences in Amsterdam

Europe’s Largest Battery to Test Green Energy Storage in Groundbreaking UK Trial

July 29, 2013 by  
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Image via Shutterstock Three companies have plans to install Europe’s largest battery at a UK substation in order to test improved renewable energy storage. Solar and wind are excellent, clean sources of energy but still outstanding is a stable method to incorporate this power into national grids, which results in intermittent power supply. S&C Electric Europe , Samsung SDI and Younicos hope to change this situation with a trial run of their new energy storage technology that has received £13 million support from the UK taxpayer. Read the rest of Europe’s Largest Battery to Test Green Energy Storage in Groundbreaking UK Trial Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , Bedfordshire substation , clean tech , europe’s largest battery , green energy storage technology , Leighton Buzzard , lithium manganese energy storage tech , renewable energy , UK , UK energy storage , wind energy        

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