Shipping’s voyage to zero carbon is uncertain

November 7, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Future goals around carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases require major breakthroughs in fuel and propulsion technologies.

Read more:
Shipping’s voyage to zero carbon is uncertain

Shipping’s voyage to zero carbon is uncertain

November 7, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Future goals around carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases require major breakthroughs in fuel and propulsion technologies.

Read more here:
Shipping’s voyage to zero carbon is uncertain

The case for prioritizing net-zero carbon emissions, especially in value chains

November 7, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

No one organization, industry or government can do it alone, especially by 2050.

Read more from the original source:
The case for prioritizing net-zero carbon emissions, especially in value chains

How developing countries put forests on the climate agenda

October 2, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How developing countries put forests on the climate agenda

Nearly a quarter of all the greenhouse gases emitted by man come from the way we manage our forests, farms and fields.

Originally posted here:
How developing countries put forests on the climate agenda

WilkinsonEyre gets green light for giant geothermal-powered biodome in Iceland

July 23, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on WilkinsonEyre gets green light for giant geothermal-powered biodome in Iceland

London-based practice WilkinsonEyre has just been granted planning permission for the Aldin Biodomes, a massive biodome complex that will showcase a rich tropical environment and local food production techniques in Iceland’s Reykjavik region. Designed for local consultancy firm Spor í sandinn, the ambitious development aims to be the “world’s first geo-climate biodome” that will also be carbon-neutral . Powered by Iceland’s abundant geothermal energy, the greenhouses are envisioned as a major city landmark in the same vein as Singapore’s Gardens by the Bay, also designed by WilkinsonEyre. Spanning approximately 48,000 square feet, the Aldin Biodomes will consist of a Main Nature Dome and a Tropical Dome. Elevated on a hilltop, the domes are designed to be seen from the city skyline and will catch the eye with undulating forms and glittering glass facades. The complex will be located on the edge of the outdoor recreational area Elliðaárdalur in the center of the Capital region, where it will serve as a new gateway to the largest green area closest to Reykjavik. The domes are oriented toward the northwest for guaranteed views of Iceland’s midnight sunsets during summer and the Northern Lights in wintertime. Related: These beautiful desert biodomes will be 100% self-sustaining The geothermal-powered Aldin Biodomes are envisioned as a year-round attraction offering more than just a welcome escape into a tropical environment during the harsh winters. In the lush Tropical Dome, visitors can enjoy a rich showcase of exotic plants as well as the Farm Lab, an educational environment on local food production. The Main Nature Dome will house a multifunctional space with a reception, an information area, a specialty restaurant, a visitors’ shop and a marketplace that emphasizes Iceland’s fresh products. “The unique and thought-provoking environments of the Biodomes are eye-catching visual landmarks on the city skyline,” said a statement on Spor í sandinn’s website. “Close attention is paid on the choice of materials, their aesthetic qualities and sustainability . Each structure catches and reflects the ever-shifting play of light from day to day and season to season — similarly to the burgeoning plant-life within. Striking colors, forms and textures of the vegetation, and the bustling throngs of visitors, will create a world of magic and a feast for the senses and the imagination.” + WilkinsonEyre Images via WilkinsonEyre

Read the original: 
WilkinsonEyre gets green light for giant geothermal-powered biodome in Iceland

LEED Platinum home generates net-positive energy in Oregon

March 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on LEED Platinum home generates net-positive energy in Oregon

Built for clients who wanted a home with minimal site impact, the Live Edge residence is an environmentally friendly beacon that boasts not only LEED Platinum certification, but also generates  net-positive energy, as it produces more energy than it consumes on an annual basis. Nestled into a bluff among rock outcroppings and juniper trees in Oregon’s Deschutes County, the luxury dwelling is the work of Salem-based firm Nathan Good Architects . Drawing inspiration from the rugged landscape, the architects fitted the contemporary house with a natural materials palette and an earth-toned color selection that tie the architecture to its surroundings. Spanning an area of 4,200 square feet, Live Edge features an L-shaped layout informed by its environment. The northern wing houses the sleeping areas, including the spacious master suite, and two offices that are connected with the south-facing open-plan living areas by a long entrance hall. Floor-to-ceiling glazing floods the interior with light and views of the outdoors, while exterior terraces extend the living spaces to the outdoors. As an energy-positive home, the building is all-electric and is equipped with a 22-kW solar array that powers everything from the all-LED lighting to the 15 kW Tesla “Power Wall” battery back-up system. In 2018, the house was recorded to have generated 21,765 kWh of electricity, yet only used 17,287 kWh. Self-sufficiency is also secured with a 1,800-gallon potable water cistern, attached greenhouse for growing vegetables, an amateur radio tower, and a wood-burning fireplace. The project’s embodied energy was lowered with the repurposing of reclaimed shipping crates as interior flooring. Related: Solar-powered Noe Hill Smarthome is an eco-friendly dream in San Francisco To give the clients the ability to comfortably age in place in the home, Live Edge follows Universal Design principles. Every bathroom includes zero-threshold showers, grab bars, 36-inch door openings, and wash-let toilets. The home is also equipped with an elevator as well as ergonomic door and cabinet hardware. + Nathan Good Architects Images by Rick Keating

Excerpt from:
LEED Platinum home generates net-positive energy in Oregon

A floating greenhouse is inserted behind a renovated Belgian home

October 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A floating greenhouse is inserted behind a renovated Belgian home

Urban farming can be tough, especially when it’s in the middle of the densely packed Belgian city of Mechelen. But thanks to the determination of a client “with green fingers” and the clever design thinking of Belgian architecture firm dmvA , a solution was conceived in House TP, a renovation project with a new greenhouse in the rear. In addition to space for growing greens, the transformed property also enjoys greater access to natural light and views of the outdoors. Located next to a church, the compact, 90-square-meter home is sandwiched between two buildings with a north-oriented rear side. To improve access to sunlight, the architects removed the back of the building save for a single steel beam that inspired the firm to insert extra beams to create a base for a “floating” greenhouse , which allows natural light to pass through to the patio space below. In contrast to the mostly closed front facade, large glazed openings were also added to the back of the building to frame views of the greenhouse from the second and third floors. Since the top floor enjoys the greatest access to natural light , the architects decided to place the primary living areas on the third floor while placing the bedroom downstairs. The ground floor houses an additional living space that can be converted into a bedroom. The removal of walls and an open-plan layout make the compact home feel larger than its footprint lets on. The stairs were also strategically placed to the side of the building to avoid blocking sight lines. Related: An urban farm and restaurant flourishes in Utrecht’s “circular” pavilion In contrast to its redbrick neighbors, the building exterior is painted a bright white. Another major exterior change includes the addition of a gate with steel blinds installed at an angle of 45 degrees. “This kind of gate provides sufficient privacy but still gives an open, light impression,” reads the firm’s project statement. “Previously, the dark corner at the gate was a problematic spot in the street, but with the intervention of dmvA, it has become a fresh corner that revives the street. dmvA not only created a house that met the wishes of the owner, but the refurbishment also led to a revival of the street.” + dmvA Via ArchDaily Images by Bart Gosselin

Here is the original: 
A floating greenhouse is inserted behind a renovated Belgian home

Worlds largest Victorian glasshouse receives a glorious restoration

September 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Worlds largest Victorian glasshouse receives a glorious restoration

After five years of restoration work, the iconic Temperate House recently reopened to the public, bringing with it an astounding 10,000 plants — many of which are rare and threatened. Designed by Decimus Burton and completed in 1899, the Temperate House is the world’s largest Victorian glasshouse and the iconic landmark of the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew . To restore the building back to its full glory, Donald Insall Associates was called upon to sensitively renovate the greenhouse and insert modern technology for improved plant cultivation and care. Appointed as the conservation architects in 2012, Donald Insall Associates was tasked with improving the Temperate House for the enjoyment of the public and creating the “best possible conditions for plants.” This included optimizing air flow standards and lighting levels. During the renovation process — the largest in Kew’s history — all botanical specimens were removed save for nine trees considered too significant to risk moving. The structure was then thoroughly cleaned and then fastidiously repainted, while advancements such as new glazing and mechanical ventilation systems were put in place. The Temperate House reopened to the public on May 5, 2018. The massive greenhouse consists of 1,500 species spanning different temperate regions around the world from the Mediterranean and Africa to Asia and island floras. Meanwhile, both the internal and external landscaping have been improved with interpretation facilities and a new dedicated education space on site. Related: Wolfgang Buttress’ Hive is brought back to life in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew “The restoration of the Temperate House has been a complex and immensely rewarding project, recalibrating contemporary understanding of Victorian architecture and the development of past innovations,” said Aimée Felton, lead architect on the project. “New glazing, mechanical ventilation systems, path and bedding arrangements all took their founding principles from Decimus Burton’s own drawings, held within Kew’s archives.” + Donald Insall Associates Via ArchDaily Images by Gareth Gardner, Thomas Erskine

Go here to read the rest:
Worlds largest Victorian glasshouse receives a glorious restoration

Harvest your own produce at this solar-powered wellness retreat

September 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Harvest your own produce at this solar-powered wellness retreat

The Inn at Moonlight Beach, located near San Diego, puts a fresh spin on wellness retreats . The inn was built with the WELL Building Standards in mind, a practice that focuses on improving the well-being of guests. Here’s a look at how the inn, redesigned and renovated by architect Shangwen Kennedy and husband Mike, is the perfect destination for your next vacation. The Inn at Moonlight Beach was constructed from reclaimed lumber and other recycled building materials. The inn is powered by solar panels , which output 90 percent of the building’s electricity. The owners also installed high-quality air and water filtration systems, as well as other environmentally conscious features, without sacrificing the comfort and well-being of guests. Related: Truly get away from it all at this gorgeous eco-resort and yoga retreat The inn has a few gorgeous shared spaces located in the main building. This includes a common room that features a book wall and dining area. Guests can enjoy bountiful fruits and vegetables in the common room, as well as ready-made breakfast baskets. After enjoying a fresh meal, guests can spend some time at the inn’s yoga studio, which offers lush garden views. Of course, they can also take a short walk to the nearby beach or explore the shops and cafes in the local town of Encinitas. The guestrooms are just as bright and inviting as the common areas. Each room features open spaces with fresh-cut flowers to make every guest feel at home. The rooms are also equipped with sitting areas, baths, modern amenities and decks that overlook the gardens below. The biodynamic gardens do more than just grace the perimeter of the inn. In addition to lending a vibrant area to view the ocean , the garden’s plants provide fresh herbs, fruits and vegetables for the establishment. The flowers are used to welcome guests in every room. The herbs are used for hot teas, and guests have full access to fruits and veggies whenever they need nourishment. + Inn at Moonlight Beach Images via Inn at Moonlight Beach

View original here:
Harvest your own produce at this solar-powered wellness retreat

Experimental furniture eyeing urban regeneration pops up in Madrid

April 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Experimental furniture eyeing urban regeneration pops up in Madrid

Enorme Studio teamed up with MINI to create an urban installation that taps into concepts of sustainability and urban regeneration. Called Mountain on the Moon, the experimental project comprises three mobile structures: a glass house/office and terraced bench seating units with attractive greenery on either side. The installation, located in Plaza de la Luna, was created for the Madrid Design Festival. Mountain on the Moon embraces the ideas of flexible and portable architecture as a means of encouraging collaboration and connection in the city. “Every day we all become increasingly aware of the need to improve our habits and the collective awareness about our environment, although nonetheless our cities—gigantic and vast—are often far from reflecting this change of paradigm,” wrote Enorme Studio. “It is urgent that, as citizens we contribute, along with different players like designers, public institutions, brands… and to start to collectively rethink new collective visions for our cities, which can regenerate the urban landscape in a way cohesive with people and their environment.” Related: Portable ParkedBench parklet injects a breath of fresh air in London The installation’s green spaces serve as informal seating, while the gabled glass house doubles as an office or lecture space equipped with USB charging points and reading lights powered by solar energy . Plywood lines the light-filled interior decorated with plants for a greenhouse -like feel. The paintings on the outside of the green terraces, which appear to mimic mountains or waves, reinforce this connection to nature. + Enorme Studio Via domus Images by Javier de Paz García, Luis Alda

Original post: 
Experimental furniture eyeing urban regeneration pops up in Madrid

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1825 access attempts in the last 7 days.